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too much blood lost at delivery, how to prevent?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
With my last birth (which was a beautiful, unassisted hospital birth) I apparently lost too much blood at teh time of delivery, not afterwards. I ended up fainting (partly because of lost blood, partly because of lost fluids from vommitting, etc) and having to have an IV put in and fluids rushed into my body. Overall, the first three or four or five hours of my sweet baby's life I was too faint to hold her much (dh cuddled with her) and it was just no fun. I don't understand why I lost too much blood. I was not anemic. Did I not eat enough protien during the last trimester? I hemorraged after the birth of my third child, but I think a lot of that was due to the fact that I was stressed out in general and her birth was very long and very painful and hard. My second birth was one of the most bloodless my midwife said she had ever seen. I was well fed (lots of protien) and well supported emotionally. Anyway, my point in wondering this is how to keep it from happening this time around...especially since my body has had so little time to heal from my last birth (my baby will be 15 months old when this baby is born in October). Any insight would be appreciated!!
post #2 of 22
I had a pph also that required a d&c. I don't know why at all. I've heard suggestions that it might have been that my labour was so long (36 hours). I've heard chlorophyl water and red raspberry tea can help, which I plan on doing next time.
post #3 of 22
I would highly recommend red raspberry leaf tea. With one of my pregnancies I drank it, and with the other I didn't. The difference in blood loss was pretty noticeable. How was your second stage managed? Nursing immediately and allowing the placenta to come in its own time can make a big diff in blood loss as well. When I lost too much blood (bordered on hemmorhage), the placenta had been actively managed -- lots of cord traction. In retrospect, I probably would have been much better off if the MW had left it alone.
post #4 of 22
How soon was the cord cut? Did you wait until after the placenta was born? (If yes, you might as well stop reading now, cause this won't apply to you!) :LOL I ask because the same thing happened to me with my first birth, and I believe it all started with the cutting of the cord a couple of minutes after my daughter was born. When that was done, a lot of the blood that should have been in my baby was still in the placenta, making it harder for my uterus to contract and expel it as it should have naturally. The midwives shot me up twice with pitocin. I don't know if they applied cord traction, but I'll never forget the excruciating uterine massage...

The other problem with cutting the cord is that my daughter had a rough start transitioning to lung breathing. She was snuffly- not too bad, but the midwives suctioned her aggressively. Her nasal passages became swollen from the suctioning, she had an even harder time breathing, and wouldn't nurse- again, this made it harder for my uterus to contract, because the natural process was interfered with. I bled heavily for a couple of weeks and ended up taking methergine to stop it.

These experiences led me to have a UC with my second birth, and we did not cut the cord for a long time. Placenta came out shortly after birth, baby breathed well on his own, and nursed immediately. My lochia was barely more than a period, with none of the huge clots I had the first time. It was exactly the way I expected it to be, when nature was allowed to take its course!
post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
With this last birth the cord was cut much sooner than I would've liked, but I delivered my baby myself with no hospital attendant there, so I think when the baby nurse came in she freaked a bit and cut the cord even though they didn't need to take the baby away from me, etc. But I bled too much with the delivery of the baby, not after the baby was born that time (the baby before I bled too much in the hours following the birth and actually the cord was cut sooner than I would like then, too because my baby was not responding and/or breathing which in retrospect she would've done much better remaining on my chest with the cord attactched, but it was a long, very stressful labor and at that point I didn't have any "fight" left in me to protest, etc). This time around I am committed to waiting until the cord stops pulsating...I think you are right about the blood building up in the placenta if it is cut right away. That makes sense.
post #6 of 22
I was told that drinking nettle tea during pregnancy helps with blood loss. Eating placenta does, too.
post #7 of 22
Are you saying the blood loss occured during second stage, not third?
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by youngnhappymamma
With this last birth the cord was cut much sooner than I would've liked, but I delivered my baby myself with no hospital attendant there, so I think when the baby nurse came in she freaked a bit and cut the cord even though they didn't need to take the baby away from me, etc. But I bled too much with the delivery of the baby, not after the baby was born that time (the baby before I bled too much in the hours following the birth and actually the cord was cut sooner than I would like then, too because my baby was not responding and/or breathing which in retrospect she would've done much better remaining on my chest with the cord attactched, but it was a long, very stressful labor and at that point I didn't have any "fight" left in me to protest, etc). This time around I am committed to waiting until the cord stops pulsating...I think you are right about the blood building up in the placenta if it is cut right away. That makes sense.
this time have a home birth!!!!! tell or give these posts to the midwives you interview. raspberry leaf tea and eat some fruits-- raspberries and blueberries and strawberries. Eat 2-3 servings of greens a day cooked or raw to build up all sorts of things including clotting factors. you might also want to take a mother's cordial for uterine toning- but it has quite a few relaxants in it as well - its action is to increase circulation, and tissue health.
another aspect is to really focus on your baby , low lights in the room and cut the cord when you get to it.
there are other things but these are just a few ideas
take care
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sevenkids
Are you saying the blood loss occured during second stage, not third?
Right, that's what I'm wondering now too? I think I misunderstood your wording. So, you were bleeding while you were pushing?
post #10 of 22
you could also take the herb alfalfa which helps prevent hemorrhage during birth, burdock root promotes strength and uterine tone, as mentioned nettle and red raspberry leaves decreases the likelihood of hemmorhage. but best of all you could ask a midwife
mandi
post #11 of 22
my midwife recomended I take fioridex so that my iron was high before labor. I started about 8 weeks out. She had done homebirths and hospital births and found that having a high iron profile going into labor really helped if you lost blood in delivery.
post #12 of 22
Yes, nettles are supposed to help with this. It has other benefits as well like making good breastmilk and helping with vericose veins. There are other benefits that elude me at the moment.
post #13 of 22
I had a similar issue. Will post more later…
post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 
Are all of these herbs supposed to be taken in a tincture? or a tea?

Yes, with my last birth the midwife said I lost too much blood AT the time of delivery. It was very fast...I pushed for maybe a total of 1 minute and she was out and in my hands (I was on my knees leaning against the tub). It was a totally painless pushing, which was wonderful compared to my last birth that hurt like ....you know what. And with that birth I bled too much AFTER my baby was born and had to have two shots of pitocin and one shot of methogin (but did not feel faint or anything...after my last birth I actually did faint) But with the birth that I hemmoraged afterwards I am pretty sure it was because I was so incredibly stressed out after a very, very long and VERY, VERY painful labor and I did not feel supported by those around me. But with this last birth and loosing so much blood, there is no explaination. With both births my hemocrat was checked during labor and was good...not low iron.
post #15 of 22
This is why I ended up in the hospital. I ;pushed for an hour (at home) and just kept pushing out more & more blood. When we got to the hosp. they said I had a lip of cervix, so maybe I was pushing on that, or maybe the drive in undilated a bit. She came out quick once we got there, but the blood kept coming too. I don't know what happened to me either, I'm pretty good with iron intake usually
post #16 of 22
Here's how it's gone for me...
birth 1--hospital, natural, bled alot
birth 2--home, took alfalfa tablets for 3 months before and red raspberry tea, normal bleeding
birth 3--home, forgot about the alfalfa, bled alot, had an IV but was OK
birth 4--took alfalfa and did rasp. leaf tea with nettles but opted for a preplanned oxytocin shot to prevent needing IV or going to hospital
This planned shot made the midwife feel better (I've had her for all the home births) but the shot turned my leg into one giant cramp!

The point...you can get alfalfa tablets at the health food/vitamin store or it's $5 a bale from the feed store Good Luck
post #17 of 22
I used Shepherd's Purse (herb) and also homeopathic remedies there is a great book by Betsy Idarius about remedies for childbirth. Anyhow Arnica is a must and Phosphorus is also good for excessive bleeding. I also took Sabina for bleeding after a miscarriage and am sure I would have had to have a D and C otherwise. But there are lots of specific remedies and would get that book and also the one by Miranda Castro is good too. I had hardly any bleeding with using homeopathy.
post #18 of 22
I'd like to support the suggestions for herbs to prevent blood loss. My favorite is nettle leaf infusion (not tea) drunk every day, more in the last two trimesters. Nettles are a good source of vitamin K (clotting agent), absorbable calcium and iron. They're good cooked as a spring green, too. Blood builder, milk supporter.

My last pregnancy I was torn quite a bit (babe was pulled out by midwife - partial third degree tear) and I lost very little blood during second or third stage. Not even as much as women with no tears or cuts, according to my midwife. I drank nettle infusion for most of my pregnancy, and raspberry leaf for the last trimester (I couldn't stand the taste of raspberry leaf at all until then). I credit my good fortune with lack of blood loss on the nettles.

Nettles taste good, earthy and green. Instructions and other suggestions with instructions are to be found in the excellent (!!) book by Susun Weed called Wise Women Herbal for the Childbearing Year. I highly recommend it.
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildfarmsmama
The point...you can get alfalfa tablets at the health food/vitamin store or it's $5 a bale from the feed store Good Luck

:LOL yep tablets have long been used and are a good extra measure or liquid chlorophyll but food first please eat your daily greens-- for clotting and bones and all sorts of good healthy reasons. and if you really must go to the feed store......
post #20 of 22
I dunno if this would help a lot, but I have read lots of places that chamomille, the pure dired flowers, not the bags, made as a tea helps to stop bleeding because it helps the uterus contract, thus helping it return to it's original state, facilitating less blood loss, so it is something to consider....couldn't hurt...
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