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Csection Support Thread April 2005 (cont discussion from March) - Page 5

post #81 of 424
Um, ok. I'm sorry.

Have you been doing anything out of the noraml? Start a new workout routine? Is BooBah nursing less? Are you stressed? Maybe you are just having a long cycle. It happens you know. I was 8 days late a few months ago. I was just late, nothing more.
post #82 of 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by its_our_family
Have you been doing anything out of the noraml? Start a new workout routine? Is BooBah nursing less? Are you stressed? Maybe you are just having a long cycle. It happens you know. I was 8 days late a few months ago. I was just late, nothing more.
BooBah is definately nursing less, but I think her brother is more than making up for the difference. It's a viscious cycle; BeanBean drinks all the milk, BooBah nurses for a while but is still hungry so she asks for food, I make less milk, BeanBean drinks it all up even more quickly.

I'm very stressed right now, because my teeth are rotting and I can't find a dentist I'm in pain all the time, and my blood pressure is really freaking high. It totally sucks.

Today I feel dizzy and nauseated, though. And Mike's had a migraine for the past few days... bleh.
post #83 of 424

I'm coming in kind of late here...

Hi, I'm Jen, and I am currently 19 months post-partum. My son Michael started out at a birth center but then was transferred and delivered by unplanned c-section after 44 hours of labor when he didn't descend (I believe he was at -2 station when delivered). The cause was determined to be a triple nuchal cord that was wrapped so tightly that my midwife had to uncoil it before she could even remove him from my uterus.

The whole experience has been a mixed bag for me. The surgery went perfectly, I had a fantastic surgeon, and I healed quickly. My son is so beautiful and healthy and I'm so thankful for him, but at the same time I feel like less of a woman and like I failed.

I want to have another child but both my husband and I are afraid. I worry about things like rupturing the incision even though I know rationally that the risk is extremely low. He says he doesn't want to see me in that much pain ever again; he felt so helpless when they wheeled me away to cut me open and it scared him badly.

My scar is more or less invisible now (low transverse incision) but there is still an area about 1-1/2" in width around it that is numb. I don't like looking at it and it bothers me if either my husband or I touches it. It makes me feel so disconnected from my own body. I don't think it's possible but psychosomatically I believe I can feel the scar inside, on my uterus.

As far as my son goes, I have a hard time saying "when my son was born," or referring to his delivery as a birth. I know he was born, but I don't feel as if I had anything to do with it, if you know what I mean.

So, there it is. It's nice to find other moms to talk to about this.
post #84 of 424
On this topic, how soon after a c-section is it safe to get pregnant again?? I haven't had a period yet (c-s was 6 weeks ago) but did have unprotected sex. I'm not thinking I am pregnant but if I was, is there even any chance for the baby??
post #85 of 424
I was told that I ought to wait a year to be on the safe side.

oh, and I had a dr's appt today-- I'm not pregnant, just late. :LOL
post #86 of 424
Hooray for late periods After rading your last post I can see how you would be. It sounds a tad stressful for you right now.

According to everything I have hear there is no risk for the baby if you get pg too soon. It doesn't cause m/c or anything like that. I think they would prefer a year for VBAC but I got pg when Tracy was around 6 months and they didn't talk like it was a big deal. I have a friend who got pg when her babe was 4 weeks old...the girls are only 9.5 months apart... and she had no problems with either her or the babe.
post #87 of 424
Wow!! Had she had a c-section for her first?? I guess the biggest worry would be stress on the uterine incision--I wouldn't want that splitting or anything!
post #88 of 424
Thread Starter 
I just wanted to say sorry for being MIA.
My FIL died and I had to suddenly go out of town. We leave in 8 days to go on vacation. Which we will need.

UPDATE: My husband has decided that he would like to cut the cord when the baby is delivered. I am very excited by this. I am going to schedule my 4D ultrasound for next month. I am looking forward to doing it!
post #89 of 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by shannon0218
Wow!! Had she had a c-section for her first?? I guess the biggest worry would be stress on the uterine incision--I wouldn't want that splitting or anything!
If this was in reference to my friend....those bbies were c-sections 5 and 6. She has 7 kids. Her first was vag the rest were by c/b.
post #90 of 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnTheFence
I just wanted to say sorry for being MIA.
My FIL died and I had to suddenly go out of town. We leave in 8 days to go on vacation. Which we will need.

UPDATE: My husband has decided that he would like to cut the cord when the baby is delivered. I am very excited by this. I am going to schedule my 4D ultrasound for next month. I am looking forward to doing it!

Yay for your dh cutting the cord. for your loss
post #91 of 424
Hello friends of the c-birth thread,

I posted in one of these threads a long time ago, when I was working through the c-section I got for my first baby (who's now 20 months old!). The story then was: failed homebirth, rushing down the mountain to the hospital due to unremitting late decels, 42 hours of labor total, complete stalling once at the hospital (go figure), extremely painful contractions the whole time (but I managed to wait 24 hours before getting an epidural), being told by the on-call OB 14 hours into my labor, "When you go into labor, blah blah blah," pitocin, phenergan, dilating to 8 or 9 before more late decels made them stop the pitocin - at which point my contractions stalled again - and finally fresh meconium in the line, which immediately precipitated the c-section.

My recovery was hard for the first two weeks (never had had surgery before, much less labor) then very good. I had numbness in my right thigh for nearly 8 months, but now it's gone completely; scar felt "weird" for about a year, but pretty much ditto. My milk came in at 5 days, from which time onward my baby nursed like a champ. I was happy in the hospital - great nursing care, great doctor (not the above-mentioned pud), my midwife, my doula, my sister and my partner with me throughout. I was groggy (and exhausted, and starving) the first day, but by the first morning pp I was enjoying my baby more than I had even expected. I got over the loss of my perfect homebirth very quickly; the only disappointment was that I couldn't lift or carry my baby for nearly 6 weeks.

Now I'm due in June and have been seeing my same mw for prenatal care. But as time goes on, the idea of trying it at home again feels less and less possible. In fact, it's like I've already given up on it in my mind. I know that I CANNOT labor (VBAC) in the hospital - I know what that's like, I tried that (though unwillingly). More importantly, I've seen what it's like there. I don't know how anyone can labor and deliver under those conditions. I feel like my only two options (different as they as) are: HBAC or repeat c-section.

I know that I will NOT be able to do another transport. That was almost the worst part of the whole experience. I know that I shut off my labor with my will, that I could never allow myself to relax and trust and labor naturally in a hospital setting. I don't really want to go to the hospital at all this time either, don't want to leave my baby boy at home, but I also know that there's no guarantee we won't have to transfer again. And I can't have that or something. So I would rather sign on for the c-section - the known, not the uncertain and unknown - again.

I feel so guilty and conflicted about these thoughts. I am ashamed to tell them to anyone, homebirth proponents and c-section advocates alike. The former will think me weak and a failure; the latter will have their knowing, I-told-you-so stance. I just don't know what to do, exactly. My partner would be thrilled about a c-section decision because he hates the idea of doing things, risky things, under uncontrolled conditions. The whole transport-down-the-mountain and the endless labor ordeal (and major emergency surgery) last time nearly finished him off. I don't know if he can take much more. He would rather put our fate in a doctor's hands (he doesn't like our mw that much to boot).

I hope this is the right place to post this. And sorry for the length.
post #92 of 424
Thread Starter 
Welcome to our little part of mothering MeliXXa! And congrats on your upcoming arrival.

I wanted to say that in many ways I could relate to your story even though I did not plan for a homebirth. I did plan a natural Bradley birth with my first baby however.
I think all of your feelings are valid and concerning at the same time. Also, I think you are right in seeing and realizing there is judgement on both sides of the fence. I've really never felt comfortable in either camp sense "choosing" a repeat csection with my youngest child. Even though I have very valid real concerns and a medical condition that warrents a cesarean birth.

From reading your story, it seems to me that your csection, was in fact needed. You labored, you tried to do it, you did things to facilitate labor and also you went for a homebirth. I think we read time and time again in this forum and other like minded ones that "medical intervention" is to the detriment of women and birth, however it has shown time and time again it is needed, facilitate babies coming into the world that may have died or suffered other complications, or women -- in empowering them to continue with pain relief. Used wisely, it is a wonderful tool, used foolishly and it can be just the opposite.

I think you have to focus on what YOU want and what YOU feel comfortable doing. It sounds to me is that you don't want to labor in the hospital and you really don't want to risk another "failed" homebirth with a transfer. (I hate to use failed as the word but nothing comes to mind at this moment) There are women who have posted on these threads currently and in the past that planned VBACs and HBACs and changed their mind. Their intuition told them differently or they realized that having a vaginal birth was not as important as they once believed it would be.

Going into my pregnancy with Jack, I considered a VBAC. I knew that physically it was not a good idea, but I had a doctor who would have allowed a trial of labor. I read the risks. I talked to doctors, CNMs, and lay midwives about my condition. The bottom line was this, for me to have a successful VBAC I would have had a baby the right size -- 7lbs, in the right position, and a unmedicated labor with nothing to alter labor at all and I still would have 50-50 chance of ending up in the OR. I've learned several things through the years -- sometimes, the risk is not worth it no matter how small. I felt more at peace with what I knew, then what I didn't know. I did accept that having a vaginal birth was not in the cards for me, and thats okay. I've made what some think to be a horrible experience into a beautiful and wonderful experience. One I do not regret. I healed faster, and had a better experience then most women I know who have children -- including those who have had homebirths.
For me, I believe this was partly because I made a decision and meditated on that decision and made choices to make having a csection a wonderful, beautiful experience. I had peace with my decision and carried out a plan with a wonderful OB. I had a quick and fairly easy recovery. I know that during surgery when they pulled Jack from me, I felt healed. I've never regretted it and I don't feel guilt nor shame over the decision to have a scheduled repeat csection.

If you want to VBAC and are at peace with it, then by all means do it but if you don't, and feel that a csection is in your best interests, then get a plan and make it a wonderful experience for yourself and your family. Do what makes you most comfortable and what you feel in your gut, vs listening to others and worrying about judgement. You didn't fail and you won't be a failure if you choose the path less natural or less "mothering".

Take care of you!
post #93 of 424
Melixxa, I couldn't agree more with what OTF said. We will be here to support you no matter what your choice is. Some of us are adamant about not having a repeat c/b, some of us (like me) have decided that that's the way we'll go if and when we have another baby. I hope you will feel welcome and safe in our little thread.
post #94 of 424
Hello ladies,

I read this thread on occasion to glean your purls of wisdom in preparation for my c/s (due to uterine reconstruction).

Kim congratulations on your pregnancy , I'm so happy for you!!

I noticed you were going to cut the cord if your husband wasn't willing - just curious how that would logistically work out, I'm assuming the doc would remove the placenta and then bring baby and placenta to you? I'm wondering if anyone has been able to delay cutting the cord until it stops pulsing? Something I read talked about having the placenta held next to the baby while waiting for the cord to stop pulsing and then cutting it. I like that idea.

Lisa
post #95 of 424
Hi Lisa . I knit, too. Knitting rules!

I'm having several symptoms of pregnancy right now, despite the fact that a negative test usually gets rid of any psychosomatic symptoms right away. I have a sneaking suspiscion that I'll be testing again later in the week. I wish I'd bought a whole bunch of those cheap tests that they're always talking about in the TTC threads.
post #96 of 424
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaG
Hello ladies,

I read this thread on occasion to glean your purls of wisdom in preparation for my c/s (due to uterine reconstruction).

Kim congratulations on your pregnancy , I'm so happy for you!!

I noticed you were going to cut the cord if your husband wasn't willing - just curious how that would logistically work out, I'm assuming the doc would remove the placenta and then bring baby and placenta to you? I'm wondering if anyone has been able to delay cutting the cord until it stops pulsing? Something I read talked about having the placenta held next to the baby while waiting for the cord to stop pulsing and then cutting it. I like that idea.

Lisa
Lisa,
I am so glad you posted. I think about you often and glad you are still around. Actually the cord can be cut after pulling the baby out, the placenta is still inside. Because my arms will be free they can give me some scissors and I can cut the cord over the sterile field. My husband wants to do it now though which makes me happy.
So far I have only read a handful of stories, on the web, that said they kept the placenta intacted after a csection. My OB has told me, as has another that really that is not feasable. I was given several reasons from infection (mostly to mom) to causing problems with the newborns when they are being checked and worked on. Most csection babies (not JAck, he came out screaming and very alert) often have to be manhandled and stimulated to get their juices flowing. The only reason I asked was because of stories I read online, for me leaving a placenta intact is not medically beneficial as my husband and I have ABO incompatibility and the cord needs to be cut right away.
I think its something to discuss with your own doctor though. The internet is sure not the place to gather info on this particular subject as I have not seen anything medically documented to say this is feasable, healthy, and done. One thing to also look at is the ability to do it too. I know you have had reconstruction and this may not be option based on where your placenta decides to settle or grow. With Elizabeth, my placenta was in one horn and with Jack it was towards the front of my uterus. This time my placenta is lying on the backside of my uterus -- which I actually prefer because I can feel movement really well, as early as 13 weeks.
post #97 of 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnTheFence
Lisa,
I am so glad you posted. I think about you often and glad you are still around. Actually the cord can be cut after pulling the baby out, the placenta is still inside. Because my arms will be free they can give me some scissors and I can cut the cord over the sterile field. My husband wants to do it now though which makes me happy.
So far I have only read a handful of stories, on the web, that said they kept the placenta intacted after a csection. My OB has told me, as has another that really that is not feasable. I was given several reasons from infection (mostly to mom) to causing problems with the newborns when they are being checked and worked on. Most csection babies (not JAck, he came out screaming and very alert) often have to be manhandled and stimulated to get their juices flowing. The only reason I asked was because of stories I read online, for me leaving a placenta intact is not medically beneficial as my husband and I have ABO incompatibility and the cord needs to be cut right away.
I think its something to discuss with your own doctor though. The internet is sure not the place to gather info on this particular subject as I have not seen anything medically documented to say this is feasable, healthy, and done. One thing to also look at is the ability to do it too. I know you have had reconstruction and this may not be option based on where your placenta decides to settle or grow. With Elizabeth, my placenta was in one horn and with Jack it was towards the front of my uterus. This time my placenta is lying on the backside of my uterus -- which I actually prefer because I can feel movement really well, as early as 13 weeks.
Well, I tried to find what I read, but it eludes me at the moment . As I recall it was written by a physician and he describes how he delivers the baby, has someone (nurse or pediatrician) hold the baby next to the abdomen while he delivers the placenta, and then they transfer both baby and placenta (still attached via umbilical cord) to the warming table, where the baby is examined, suctioned if needed, etc. and once the cord stops pulsing it is then cut. It definitely intrigued me.

However, it does make sense that this may not always be practical or ideal. It's good to know that me or my husband will be able to cut the cord.

Kim, thank you for continuing to remind me to not get overly invested in there being only "one way". I am grateful to have you, and others, along this journey.

Lisa
post #98 of 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
Hi Lisa . I knit, too. Knitting rules!
Hey there , yes it does. Amazing sanity benefits
post #99 of 424
Lisa, my OB had agreed to do delayed clamping--very much as you just described but she did warn me that it would only be feasable if everything was perfect. As it turned out, everything with the baby was perfect, she was screaming when her head was the only thing out (very cool) but my spinal had not taken so I was feeling everything and my blood pressure shot through the roof, so their only focus was on getting things done quickly.
What I ended up doing with my OB was write down all the things I'd like to happen, then she asked me which ones were most important and we went over all the things that could throw a wrench in the plan. She agreed to all she could to honor my wishes if I agreed that she could change things without me being upset if she felt it would be dangerous to follow our original plans.
I did get; no drape up once the first cut was completed; dh did cut the cord; we kept our placenta; music in the OR from a cd I made; recovered in my room with family and my baby; my dh plus my mother in the OR as support; my arms were not restrained and once she was born my head was placed on a pillow making it easier to cuddle with her.
For sure as OTF said, don't get too attached to a plan, approach it as this is your "ultimate" and be happy with getting things as close to that as you can--but ultimately the only thing that really matters is that baby coming home with you
post #100 of 424
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaG
Kim, thank you for continuing to remind me to not get overly invested in there being only "one way". I am grateful to have you, and others, along this journey.

Lisa
What a wonderfully sweet thing to say. I often think of leaving MDC but don't because of this thread mainly. And mainly my age. I've grown as a mother and a woman and I have definitely abandoned some of my ideals to do things that work better for me and for my kids.

The real key, the one I am stressing to my SIL who is due 10 weeks after me, is that there isn't one way to do things. There are options, you just have to find the right folks and doctor to help you as you advocate for yourself, your pregnancy, and birth.

My goal this summer is to get a Cesarean Goddess site up. I want it to be open to all but I think it would be great to be able to get a lot of info in one place instead of trying to fetch it from here there and yonder and peice meal the info.

I would love to read the article you mentioned above. I definitely haven't come across something from an actual physician and would love to read it.
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