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Push Pal - have you seen this? - Page 2

post #21 of 42
AH HAHAHAHAHA !!!

Can you actually see someone purchasing this contraption and, like whipping them out in the delivery room?!
"Honey! Strap me into the Pushpal!"
post #22 of 42
I have a Pushpal.

I call him DH.
post #23 of 42
I don't know, I usually hate products, and of course I doubt I would actually buy something for childbirth.

BUT... I pushed in exactly this position. Laboured in lots of positions, thought I would birth squatting. But felt great on my back. And couldn't get my legs comfy. I dont think this is so bad, at least if it were free it would have been useful to me. If it fit around my chubby legs.
post #24 of 42
I don't know. I don't see it as a bad thing at all. Humans are advanced and use tools. This is just a tool.

I liked the semi-reclining position when I was pushing out John. I felt odd about it after hearing how bad it is, but my MW said it can be great - it's up to the mom. We used tools - tug of war with a sheet, for instance.

So - if moms like that tool and feel that it helps their experience, more power to them!
post #25 of 42
What the heck is a "dry labor"?
post #26 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by famousmockngbrd
The whole thing is just too ridiculous. I feel bad for the first woman who has the velcro straps fail and whacks herself in the face in mid-push.
You crack me up!
post #27 of 42
Well what I find odd is that they act like although this is the most common pushing position there was just no way to really achieve it before this "breakthrough product." Seriously now stirrups anyone? I gave birth twice in what I thought was called the semi-lithography position but I was much more upright than what they're showing. I wasn't quite sitting up at a 90 degree angle but fairly close. Anyway both breakaway beds had stirrups and handles. It was not at all difficult to get myself in the "proper" position and that was with epidurals. It sort of baffles my mind that they imply this is so difficult to do. I definitely agree it's not the best position to push but it's not that hard to get into with the equipment they already have. I mean that's the position they want us in so is it really a surprise they're ready for it?

Totally OT but with my natural birth of DD I was ordered to be flat on my back and that was not surprisingly quite difficult to get good force going.
post #28 of 42
aside from my not so nice thoughts about the product, along with those lovely testimonials, couldn't they have chosen a much nicer fabric? why black with that white writing on it? they could have at the very least chosen something that was much prettier!!!
mandi
post #29 of 42
Ha, I didn't even really notice. Seems to me everything made for labor and delivery is just hospital like and sterile looking and that is just the way it is. They should make hospitals prettier too!

There is one that just went up close to us recently and it is very nice looking. They said it didn't really cost them extra to do it either! It was simply choosing the same shape chairs with different coverings. A different color floor other than white. No white walls etc. and it made the place so much more inviting instead of scary looking.

Yes, prettier is nice!
post #30 of 42
They should rent out the blank space...above the logo! :LOL"Your ad Here"
Sorry, but during the pushing stage, That velcro wouldn't stand a chance with me, I'd pull those suckers right off!
I'm more inclined to Home Depot knee pads myself!
post #31 of 42
I am no medical professional but I would think that squatting would be easer and do the same thing.
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie
I have a Pushpal.

I call him DH.
:LOL
post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerlowyn
:LOL
Yeah, well, considering I managed to kick my doula in the face and send her sprawling across the room, maybe one of these would have come in handy...
post #34 of 42
how ridiculous.
post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by famousmockngbrd

The whole thing is just too ridiculous. I feel bad for the first woman who has the velcro straps fail and whacks herself in the face in mid-push.
That thought came to my mind, as well. Very, sad.
post #36 of 42
Quote:
When instructed to push by your physician, midwife or nurse (this will occur when your cervix is completely dilated and ready for pushing), grab the straps with each hand and pull your legs toward your shoulders. This will help position your legs for pushing. When you are told to stop pushing, you may lower your legs and relax until the next contraction. Repeat the process each time you are instructed to push until the baby is delivered.
This whole paragraph just pisses me off for so many, many reasons. :
post #37 of 42
Quote:
I'm more inclined to Home Depot knee pads myself!
:
post #38 of 42
So, is the problem the Push Pal itself or the message that is on the website that implies that something like this is necessary to give birth?

I have no problem with tools at all. After all, this internet tool is sure pretty darn cool, though some would say I should be more "natural" and just go outside and talk to my neighbors. It's a personal choice. I don't think women should be belittled for choosing to use this or any other tool.
post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnTheBrink
So, is the problem the Push Pal itself or the message that is on the website that implies that something like this is necessary to give birth?

I have no problem with tools at all. After all, this internet tool is sure pretty darn cool, though some would say I should be more "natural" and just go outside and talk to my neighbors. It's a personal choice. I don't think women should be belittled for choosing to use this or any other tool.
Forceps are tools too. So is a birthing stool. In fact if I am going to be using any tool in labor I would prefer it be a birthing stool or pool.

I don't think belittling women is the idea here. I have a problem with this website and other selling it that the proper position for childbirth is on the back with your legs to your shoulders. Then comments like, "When you are instructed to push." and "When you are told to stop pushing." Which implys you have to be instructed that you can't push when your body is telling you to, only when the dr tells you to. If you choose to be semi reclined and want to use the push pal I don't think its a bad thing. What I think is terrible is how the website is marketing it. Because it is so typical of the medical community. "Other positions for labor and delivery exist, please discuss which position you will be using with your caregiver." Its phrases like that that sicken me. Just goes to show you what a sad state the birthing community is in - that there are women who don't know there are other position available! Maybe this gives drs a reason not to let a partner or doula help the mother by holding her legs? Or even gives drs a reason to give less time to push. I'd probably feel totally different about the product if the website said, "For those women who choose to birth in a semi reclined position." "When you feel the urge to push just grab hold and pull back till you are done pushing." "Won't get in the way if you decide to change positions during the pushing stage."

Michelle
post #40 of 42
Quote:
So, is the problem the Push Pal itself or the message that is on the website that implies that something like this is necessary to give birth?
My personal problem with the Push Pal in of itself (and I had seen the website before once, quite some time ago) is that the one way to use it is by being on your tailbone or back and that in no way promotes the more ideal positions for birthing.

My problem with the message on the website is that of course something like that is not necessary to give birth. The Dr's comments section seemed to imply that it made the delivery more convenient for the Dr's themselves by shortening the pushing stage (welllll if the moms weren't in the lithotomy position in the first place many pushing stages wouldn't be so prolonged.) Plus a "long" pushing stage all by itself isn't exactly a complication.

The mothers' comments section gave me the impression that many women are happy that they used a tool to allow them to comply to their Dr's wishes (legs out of the way, on their backs for the Dr's ease, not their own ease). The Dr/patient relationship can be a very authoritative/submissive sort of relationship when it involves birth. Many women will do whatever Dr's say short of standing on their heads because they believe it will ensure the healthiest outcome for their babies.

Quote:
I have no problem with tools at all. After all, this internet tool is sure pretty darn cool, though some would say I should be more "natural" and just go outside and talk to my neighbors. It's a personal choice. I don't think women should be belittled for choosing to use this or any other tool.
The internet can be a very useful tool. But the internet has a vast amount of uses. This Pushpal has only one purpose (to facilitate delivery for the OB, I won't say for the woman because it's not usually easier to push on one's back) so isn't that sort of comparing apples and oranges?
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