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Moms dealing with elevated lead levels - Page 19

post #361 of 624
GooeyRN, can you tell me more about your Dyson? When I checked into vacuums the only vacuum I found to reliably remove lead dust was the Nilfisk family vac, so that is what we bought. The problem with most uprights is that even though they claim to be hepa, not all of the air is directed through the hepa filter. We owned an Oreck Hepa that was only 2 years old and I sold it and bought the Nilfisk for that reason.

TIA,

Ashlea
post #362 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by AMum View Post
GooeyRN, can you tell me more about your Dyson? When I checked into vacuums the only vacuum I found to reliably remove lead dust was the Nilfisk family vac, so that is what we bought. The problem with most uprights is that even though they claim to be hepa, not all of the air is directed through the hepa filter. We owned an Oreck Hepa that was only 2 years old and I sold it and bought the Nilfisk for that reason.

TIA,

Ashlea
Its the DC15 model. It is obviously working to remove lead, since dd's lead level dropped so much after using it for only 3 months. (dd was being checked every 3 months)
post #363 of 624
Well, that's good to know. I love my Nilfisk, but the Dyson is more readily available, I'd imagine. We live in the city, so run into other lead abatement families, good to have another vacuum to recommend, kwim?
post #364 of 624
I believe there is a federal law regarding landlords and lead paint, requiring that they notify you in writing before you move in of the lead paint. . . . so I believe the landlord will be responsible for the repairs. Get clicking over at epa.gov, and there is a toll free number with info. We have never sued the old landlord. . . . but we probably need to, considering we can't afford an expensive vacuum.

I want to proceed with further natural chelation methods, since I no longer believe that blood lead level is the only marker of metal toxicity. Our kids have it stored in their organs and bones. . . . there was another article in the paper today about childhood lead levels and adult violence and I have spent all morning crying, again. I am a writer, too, and MiriamJoyce's rather glib info-fishing post really got under my skin. Such things are too painful for me to write about in the moment.
post #365 of 624
Thanks very much for the response AMum and provocativa. From our research landlords/owners are required to notify tenants about lead in pre-1978 built houses, whether it is known or unknown. But there is no teeth behind this law. If they don't all that can happen is the EPA can bug them to supply you with info, but not require them to abate. So, argh.
post #366 of 624
While I am so glad to find this tread, I am horrified to be here.
We bought an old house in MA 2 yrs ago. Did we think there might be lead? Sure. Did we do anything about it? No.

I have a 4.5 yr old dd and a 1 yr old.
My dd was tested at 3, 6 months after we moved in and was within normal limits.
I thought "great, no lead and promptly forgot about it.
UNTIL, my ds who is now 1 was tested last week and came back at 14.
Now I am in total freak out mode. A lead detector guy was here all morning and there is lead paint everywhere including our front porches where the paint is clearly chipping.
I feel absolutely sick and dh is making as if it is no big deal at all.
We cannot just move out.
MOst of the paint is in fine condition and we do not open the windows.
Right now I am focusing on just preventing further lead exposure as much as possible, but I don't even know the first place to begin!

I am also anxiously awaiting my dd's results and am terrified what they will be. She SITS on that porch all the time. What the heck is wrong with me/ I feel like the most irresponsible parent in the world.
As sad as it is, I am glad my ds was "only 14" it could be a lot worse considering the exposure potential in this house.

Anyway, if anyone has any advice or just a huge hug I could use it!
THanks.
post #367 of 624
i have a quick question about lead levels: is there such a thing as a ZERO? or does everyone have some lead in their bodies? (from air pollution, etc.)
post #368 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by nannyboo View Post
i have a quick question about lead levels: is there such a thing as a ZERO? or does everyone have some lead in their bodies? (from air pollution, etc.)
Good question. When Lucy was diagnosed, her lead was high enough that she was admitted to the hospital immediately. The pediatrician on staff that night had actually done extensive work in inner city Baltimore, which evidently has a very high rate of lead poisoning, so he was kind of a lead expert. (Lucky us, I guess.) Anyway, I asked him the same question. His response was, "Well, no amount of lead is 'normal' for a person to have in their body. That being said, this is New Jersey, which is a very toxic state. We generally don't see kids with zero lead levels, so we consider 3 to 6 to be normal." She's down to a level of 7 now, with a high of 47 last summer.
post #369 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acugirl View Post
Anyway, if anyone has any advice or just a huge hug I could use it!
THanks.
Here is a huge hug.

You'll want to read the whole thread but here are the nuggets:

implement shoes off in the house. Wash hands before eating anything or when coming in from playing outside or after playing on the floor (it is in the dirt around the house). Get ahold of a nilfisk (or Dyson -see above posts) vacuum. High protein diet. Lots of cilantro will help get it out of the body. Highest absorbability is from breathing dust as opposed to eating lead contaminated stuff or absorbing through skin contact, or probably even drinking it. Go out on the porch with a few buckets and/or spray bottle and clean it top to bottom. Get everything wet a couple of times. Use detergent (it binds with the lead). Bag up the rags you used (do not run them in your washing machine as this will contaminate clothing, dipes, etc.). Put new sod down in the yard and put wood chips or rocks around the house immediately. Spray these down every once in awhile. Keep walkways to the doorways clean. Wipe floors down every day.

What else am I missing, mamas?
post #370 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by emma_goldman View Post
implement shoes off in the house. Wash hands before eating anything or when coming in from playing outside or after playing on the floor (it is in the dirt around the house). Get ahold of a nilfisk (or Dyson -see above posts) vacuum. High protein diet. Lots of cilantro will help get it out of the body. Highest absorbability is from breathing dust as opposed to eating lead contaminated stuff or absorbing through skin contact, or probably even drinking it. Go out on the porch with a few buckets and/or spray bottle and clean it top to bottom. Get everything wet a couple of times. Use detergent (it binds with the lead). Bag up the rags you used (do not run them in your washing machine as this will contaminate clothing, dipes, etc.). Put new sod down in the yard and put wood chips or rocks around the house immediately. Spray these down every once in awhile. Keep walkways to the doorways clean. Wipe floors down every day.

What else am I missing, mamas?
Yes to all of this. Also, make sure your child's diet is high in calcium, vitamin C, and iron. Keep an eye open for hidden sources of lead, like vinyl mini blinds. Wash your child's hands constantly! Have a shoes-off house.

post #371 of 624
Acugirl, .
I understand feeling like an irresponsible parent. That is how I felt (still feel) when our DD1 had elevated lead levels three years ago. It was so overwhelming to have the Dept of Pub Health come into our house and tell us where all the lead is/was. I hope your DDs lead level comes back low.

I agree with pps about keeping the dust to a minumum and cleaning often.
Hugs,
Michelle
post #372 of 624
:

That is so true! Having the health dept come in and interview me, and take samples from around the house. And then, my pediatrician was required by law to report all blood tests until her levels were in an acceptable range and they closed our case... very overwhelming, and really made me feel like such a shmuck.
post #373 of 624
Took Rowan for her wbv and got a blood draw. She is 32 mos now and we explained what was going to happen. Fortunately it was the good nurse, not the guy who couldn't get it last time after multiple sticks. Dh held her on his lap (dd, not the nurse) and I couldn't be there but I was watching from around the corner. Well, she didn't even cry. After it was over though she let out a wail, but for just a couple seconds. Haven't got the result back yet.

You mamas who have had your dc in the hospital, etc --I feel for you so much!
post #374 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by provocativa View Post
I am a writer, too, and MiriamJoyce's rather glib info-fishing post really got under my skin. Such things are too painful for me to write about in the moment.
Hey, apologies. Looking back it does look rather glib, but I didn't mean it to. I think I was trying to hold myself distant from my own pain--I've certainly cried hours over this too. This is one of the few honest forums discussing the topic I've found and I very much appreciate it. I should have at least acknowledged that I know many people may not be up for rehashing the details and that I totally respect all the incredible work we are all putting in on this. (And, I've realized as I've been going through it, I shouldn't have taken an assignment on this topic while the experience was so fresh.) Anyhow, sorry 'bout that.
post #375 of 624
Hey All,
My 9 month old came in at a 7 last week. He was a 2 at 6 months. We're testing every 3 months because this house is "hot". If it goes up much more, I want to move. DH doesn't want to move out of our charming old toxic neighborhood. I know it's a "normal" level but it wouldn't be that high if we didn't live in this house. If we were in the 'burbs, I'm sure it would be a 0 or 1 or "less than 2". We can't afford to take care of the problem here (total paint failure outside, peeling and dropping into our yard)d, but we can afford to move.

Why don't more people make a bigger deal of this?
Why does everyone think I'm crazy?
post #376 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregongirlie View Post
Why don't more people make a bigger deal of this?
Why does everyone think I'm crazy?
hugs for you. I know. My DP thought I was absolutely nuts. he worried more about when I was going to stop breastfeeding (like THAT's gonna happen!)!
post #377 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregongirlie View Post
Why don't more people make a bigger deal of this?
Why does everyone think I'm crazy?
Please don't flame me, because I don't take issues of race lightly (I'm a white woman, and constantly struggle with my assumptions). Anyway, I think the answer to your questions is that mainstream American culture thinks that lead poisoning is something that happens to poverty-stricken inner city African American kids (make it the 1970's instead of today, and it's even more believable). Anyway, I dealt with surprise from the health department and family and friends that it was happening to us, a suburban white middle class family.

FWIW, I'm thrilled that my daughter is at the level yours is now! That being said, I'd be more concerned, if I was in your shoes, that her level was going up.
post #378 of 624
stacey, i have been following your eloquent posts on another thread about lead-i like you! and yes i can tell you the state of kentucky had NO idea what to do with my middle class white lead poisoned baby, child of nurse mama! i think there latest plan is to ignore us, which is okay with me. I got the report of lead in our home a few months ago and it said we had to respond with our plan of action with in 60 days so i made a report outlining how we had addressed the lead (ChildGaurd paint and lots of wet mopping mostly, oh and we replaced the flooring in 3 rooms) that was 7 weeks ago and i have heard nothing, they are supposed to come and re-test the house. Frankly, as long as his levels comtinue to decrease i would prefer that they not. I am sure i probably missed something that he is unable to reach. we had a spike 2 months ago, his level was 9 and went up to 14, but it is down to 13 at his last test. about every other month we test i have had to fight with the lab people who want to do a fingerprick 'no, that is really considered more of a screening, ect, ect' last time i told the tech that and she said 'well......i've never heard that!" 'well, now you have : ' was what i wanted to say!
post #379 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acugirl View Post
While I am so glad to find this tread, I am horrified to be here.
We bought an old house in MA 2 yrs ago. Did we think there might be lead? Sure. Did we do anything about it? No....

Anyway, if anyone has any advice or just a huge hug I could use it!
THanks.


I live in MA too. Lead is inescapable here. Please try not to feel that this is your fault. The mixed messages are everywhere. Everyone says that lead is everywhere, the law says you have to remove it, but then people tell you to relax. We started lead abatement because we are landlords (a two family we live in) and because we were pursuing adoption. We know we might squeak by on the adoption with lead, but we also knew that it could stop the adoption in it's tracks if they found clear hazards and asked for in inspection. So we decided to remove it before our home study. Everyone thought we were crazy. Then ds's lead test came back high. Thankfully, we were on a waiting list for a contractor, so we got the paint out soon and ds's number came down.

Did ASAP do your inspection? They are really good about helping you find funding. We used a program called Get the Lead Out. We recieved $25,000 in a no interest loan. It was more paperwork than adopting our daughter, but the loan does not become payable until we sell our home.
post #380 of 624
Here is the link for Get the Lead Out:

https://www.masshousing.com/portal/s...=2&cached=true

It looks like they have changed the requirements some.
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