or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Women's Health  › Moms dealing with elevated lead levels
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Moms dealing with elevated lead levels - Page 5

post #81 of 624
thank you for the warning about crayons. ds is past the age of putting things in his mouth, but i'm putting away the crayons andwill only let him use them under supervision. what do you let your children draw with?

sorry for all the questions, but I may have missed the "healthy eating guide"--is there a link upthread? thanks!
post #82 of 624
My older children say I am a mean mommy because I threw away all the crayons and markers. I live in an apartment and just cannot afford the writing on the wall, so to speak. :LOL
My children have a MagnaDoodle(?) tha they draw with. No paper to waste, no marks on the walls or anywhere else. If it's something really cool, then I take a picture with the digital camera.
Can you tell I love trees? :LOL
post #83 of 624
we're renters, too, but luckily ds has not been that interested in drawing on the walls (though occasionally the floors ). and yes the trees love you back!

we have a small magnadoodle, too, and are thinking of getting a chalkboard. do you know whether chalk is safe? it seems there are heavy metals everywhere...
post #84 of 624
I'm an artist, so not letting my child experience color and creativity in multiple mediums is an anathema to me. We ordered Stockmar beeswas crayons from Germany. They might still have cadmium, though I trust that company more than crayola. I make food based paints. It is ridiculously easy to find paper headed for the recycling bin that has only been used on one side- so we just re-use it then recycle. Just ask an office drone to save some for you. We have also gotten the ends of butcher paper rolls from a restaurant that uses them on their tables. I don't question the pp mama's knowledge of cadmium (I think it's not used in every color, though).
post #85 of 624
Nora- sounds like an excellent plan! I can't think of anything else to suggest.

Our windows and sills (NEW) failed the lead swipe test. The floors were OK. I was disappointed! But it turns out my husband FORGOT to wash down the new windows after construction. : He did do the floors, though, so those were OK.

So we are back to scrubbing the new windows and I am actually going to paint the old wooden sills to make them easier to clean. They are beautiful but not in great shape, and hold the lead dust.

Nora -- what prompted you to be so careful in your house? I forget... your kids had high normal levels?

Liz
post #86 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by late-night nan
we're renters, too, but luckily ds has not been that interested in drawing on the walls (though occasionally the floors ). and yes the trees love you back!

we have a small magnadoodle, too, and are thinking of getting a chalkboard. do you know whether chalk is safe? it seems there are heavy metals everywhere...
You can make your own chalk! There are recipes on-line...I made one with egg shells and food coloring and other stuff. It was a long time ago and I remember it being a PITA at the time. I think it had more to do with not having all the right utensils.
post #87 of 624
Thread Starter 
I just brought home the july/august issue of Mothering from the library and saw on the last page an ad for something called PCA-Rx. "A powerful, biologically active detoxification agent." Here is the link

http://ssl.maxamlabs.com/MAXAM_ASP_V...ProductINDX=47

Any one heard of this??
post #88 of 624
On crayons, our lead guy from the city said that he has tested a bunch. Yes, even crayola have lead, but only some colors, and, interestingly, only certain boxes. So a given color might have lead in one box and not in another. Variation at the factory?? I let my kids use crayons and markers, but I am now vigilant about crayons not being in baby's reach.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CatskillMtnMama
Our windows and sills (NEW) failed the lead swipe test. The floors were OK. I was disappointed! But it turns out my husband FORGOT to wash down the new windows after construction. : He did do the floors, though, so those were OK.

aagh! how frustrating! after all you did to make it better! I feel for you. I'm really impressed that you're getting back on the horse, as they say.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CatskillMtnMama
Nora -- what prompted you to be so careful in your house? I forget... your kids had high normal levels?
I just happened to get them a lead test, all three, just becuase I'd been meaning to for ages. The older kids were 3. The baby, who I figured would be 0 was 8. So I am worried that he's only going to elevate from here unless we take action. I can't wait for the hepa vac to arrive, so we can give the house one big suction cleaning!

I'm now a big advocate for everyone getting their kids tested. I bet y'all are too!
post #89 of 624
What about Dyson vacuums? Has anyone done research on them? We just bought one, and I'm tempted to return it and buy a Nilfisk, but wondered if it would work just as well. Probably not.

We're buying an older home, and there's chipping paint in it. We're in an apartment right now, and hope that we can get lead issues taken care of before moving in. We recently moved out of an apartment filled with lead hazards. I looked high and low for a lead-free apartment, and found our current one. We can only afford a one bedroom, but it was worth it to me to get the kids (6 mos. and 2.5 years) away from the lead.

I'm scared silly about the lead, and wish we could afford a home without it. No dice.
post #90 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by welldone
What about Dyson vacuums? Has anyone done research on them? We just bought one, and I'm tempted to return it and buy a Nilfisk, but wondered if it would work just as well. Probably not.

We're buying an older home, and there's chipping paint in it. We're in an apartment right now, and hope that we can get lead issues taken care of before moving in. We recently moved out of an apartment filled with lead hazards. I looked high and low for a lead-free apartment, and found our current one. We can only afford a one bedroom, but it was worth it to me to get the kids (6 mos. and 2.5 years) away from the lead.

I'm scared silly about the lead, and wish we could afford a home without it. No dice.
I would check with your county or state, because when buying a home, the homeowner or city is required to take care of the lead.
In MN, since the city owned the house, they were required to replace all the pipes, windows, etc before they could sell it. Of course, they tried to sell it to us anyways, until I called the Health Department and harrassed the city zone people(?)....can't remember off the top of my head what they were called.
So, anyways, no money out of our pocket for a problem that should have been taken care of years ago, kwim?
post #91 of 624
Also, wanted to add that some Health Departments or Lead Programs will pay for the Nilfisk vacuums for you.
I would do a little research and see what you can find.
post #92 of 624
I was reading the posts and saw someone ask about liquid Cascade. No, that will not work. You need the powdered kind, even the new lemon-scented one works.
It is because of the TSP in it. TSP bonds to the lead and cleans it off the floors, walls, windows, shoes, etc.
I used to wash everything, well, not our clothes, but toys, shoes, baby gates, anything the kids touched or tried to chew on was washed with powdered Cascade or else the straight TSP powder that sold at the hardware store.
Also, the rinse bucket with just water is important!
Thanks to the pp for pointing that one out! And the part about never mixing the two. Also, don't forget to change the mopheads frequently.

It was cheaper and safer in the long run for me to move.
It is sad that the government that helped ban lead is lazy about taking care of the problem. You just have to call and call and write and write, but you should be able to get your house lead-free without taking money from your pocket.

the previous links I provided should lead you to the appropriate places and people to call/harrass.
post #93 of 624
Hm...I'm not sure this can be done here in PA. From what I understand, the sellers don't have to take care of lead unless they choose to. And since we're getting a lead inspection, we're required to pass that information on to any future buyers. (That's why most people don't do lead inspections around here.)

I will check with the health dept. re: the vacuums, though. But I've done a lot of research around here, and people treat me like I'm nuts when I ask anything about lead paint. Just about every house in this county has lead paint, but when I took my daughter into a health center to get her finger poked (the health dept. sent me there), the nurses kept asking why I was doing it. As it they never do these. I was appalled.

And, I never got the results.
post #94 of 624
welldone- I lived in PA for awhile! Outside of Eerie. I would check again because it is a 'new' problem and takes awhile for people to get on the train, so to speak and fight for their rights.

I ran into the same problem in MN, and I just fought and fought until it happened. It is well worth it when you think of your children's quality of life, kwim?

Lead Elimination Plan PA
okay, the links to read it are Adobe so I couldn't cut and paste, but if you read the one about homes, you will see that PA state is mandated to make the house lead-free.
I hope the above link helps...it gives the name of the contact person, too.
post #95 of 624
Nora -- So you are in a situation like us. Lulu was a 7 lead. Not terrible, but still present. You and I are doing some precautionary work (hopefully) rather than remedial.

Welldone --
Make sure you go back and read the posts in this thread about vacs. Nilfisk is the only consumer vac that is certified for lead abatement. Dyson is not a true HEPA vac. if you are doing lead clean up, you should return the Dyson and get the Nilfisk (aprox $500 ). Be careful, dyson will say it has a true HEPA filter, but this is very different from being a true HEPA vac. The filter is hepa, but the lead dust is blown out of the vacuum as part of the functioning of the machine.

Hope this helps.

Liz
post #96 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaInTheBoonies
I was reading the posts and saw someone ask about liquid Cascade. No, that will not work. You need the powdered kind, even the new lemon-scented one works.
It is because of the TSP in it. TSP bonds to the lead and cleans it off the floors, walls, windows, shoes, etc.
I used to wash everything, well, not our clothes, but toys, shoes, baby gates, anything the kids touched or tried to chew on was washed with powdered Cascade or else the straight TSP powder that sold at the hardware store.
Also, the rinse bucket with just water is important!
Thanks to the pp for pointing that one out! And the part about never mixing the two. Also, don't forget to change the mopheads frequently.
We have something called TSP-PF which is phosphate-free. Would this work, too?

Otherwise, I think it's better to go with straight TSP rather than Cascade since we are trying to avoid the chemicals in regular dishwasher soap.
post #97 of 624
Hello sisters-in-lead-distress,

So... dh mentioned that a maracca had broken in the playroom. and it made a mess of metallic gray beads. Tiny. lead colored, if you will. all over the floor. It's a big room and I had never noticed. we don't know when this happened. But it's been a while. and now you can find little gray beads in the dust by the baseboards all around the room.

It's a huge room.

And here's the kicker. they're round. They roll. : so if we get one area perfect, and move something around, the lead beads can roll right on over to the perfect area.

WHY are people allowed to sell lead beads in maraccas? It was not imported. It was a little purple pastic maracca we got as a gift.

On a lighter note, those hepavacs can really SUCK! Hoo doggies, that vac is impressive!
post #98 of 624
this will be of interest to those following this thread, lead in vinyl lunchboxes!
http://www.cehca.org/lunchboxes.htm#test
post #99 of 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by late-night nan
this will be of interest to those following this thread, lead in vinyl lunchboxes!
http://www.cehca.org/lunchboxes.htm#test
Just wanted to add that almost any malleable type plastic has a greater chance of containing lead and/or cadmium.
That is why a lot of parents have started demanding natural wooden toys that are not painted or treated...like the waldorf toys and such. Myself, I just use the lead test sticks you can buy at Menards or most hardware type stores and if any toys test positive I first call the 1-800 number to report them and the health department, then I dispose of properly...which here means it goes in a 'special' landfill. I guess it is one that will not leach into any underground water that could get in the lakes or rivers. Thinking about it, I suppose that is better than burning it, right?

For 9 years I have been writing letters to Disney. They are the worst about letting lead and cadmium be put in their toys. And Barbie. We don't get Barbie toys, but they do come as an occasional gift, kwim?

Please keep your children safe. Some damage is irreversible.
post #100 of 624
Thread Starter 
oh NoraJadesMama, I am so sorry. That's awful about the toy.

Well, my days of being stressed out about the lead dust in my home should be over!!!!!

the contractor finished today and the inspector also came today to do the follow up swipe tests, although I wasn't here for that part.

To re-cap, after my daughter's routine 1 year lead test last November came back at 31, we were contacted by the health department. They came in with someone from the Department of Environment who was able to tell me where all the lead was. As they were telling us all the work that needed to be done they noticed our dismay and referred us to the Dept of Housing and Community Development. There is federal and state money available for lead abatement. They have grant programs but also no-interest, no-payment loans that you pay back when you sell your house. There was quite a bit of paperwork involved and the whole process seemed to take forever, but we found out a few months ago that we were approved for a grant. Then we had to wait for the certified lead abatement contractor to fit us into his schedule. They provided us with a trailer to move our stuff into and the few nights we had to stay in a hotel while they did the inside was included. The work, totaling $27,000 is being totally paid for. They vinyled over, painted over, or replaced wood on the front and back porch. They replaced all the windows and the great thing is that they are all custom fitted. They could have just put in some small standard windows and then put plywood over the gaps like my brother's landlord did to him. They put down a layer of mulch around the outside of the house and a layer of polyurethane over the gouged dining room floor that was trapping a lot of lead dust. There was no mention of the possibility of receiving a HepaVac. oh well.!

So I would strongly urge everyone to check your state’s DHCD website for their Single family home Rehabilitation and lead abatement programs. What I would not encourage is for anyone to be living at this level of poverty so that you qualify for these programs. After I quit my job to be a FT mom, my husband began a career in real estate and had crazy bad luck (a client even died) so we basically had zero income for a long time. We used all our savings and racked up some cc debt. When we began applying for some assistance with the lead it was obvious we had no way of paying for any of it.

OMG, all those sleepless nights, and all my new gray hairs, but I think we are all going to be ok. Her last level was at 19 so it will be interesting to see how long it takes to get to zero.

Hugs to everyone and their families.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Women's Health
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Women's Health  › Moms dealing with elevated lead levels