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Reggio Emilia Approach in your area? - Page 2

post #21 of 88

I miss our Reggio School

My daughter attended a Reggio-inspired daycare at a local community college outside of Denver, CO (Children's Center at Red Rocks Community College). We loved it and if I'm ever lucky enough to move back to CO, I'll re-enroll her and any future kids I have.
post #22 of 88
There's one in Maryland with a few branches and my impression on visiting was how *loud* it was....very large school, lots of classrooms. I remembered in my reading about having quiet places for kids to retreat within the class, and they had a few nooks, but the layout of the school was such that they were small, and still surrrounded by busyness - not much peacefulness. The arts and creativity emphasis was lovely, but I think they had a layer of philosophy and marketing but the day to day staff may not have had much grounding in the approach. Just my superficial impression - it wasn't what I expected from Reggio Emilia reading.

http://www.youngschool.com/earlyed.htm
post #23 of 88
Yes! A wonderful N-12 school called the Lincoln School. It has been around since the 1800's, is Quaker based and is an all girls school.

My dd was accepted to Kindergarten there....the only problem is that it costs $18,000/year and we qualified for very minimal financal aid. (Dh hasn't taken a paycheck in 6 months) ...She would have loved it there.

www.lincolnschool.org
post #24 of 88

looking for reggio-emilia in Denver area

Hi -

Does anyone know of any reggio-emilia style preschools in the Denver area?

Thanks!

Erin
post #25 of 88
Quote:
Does anyone know of any reggio-emilia style preschools in the Denver area?
Yes! Explore and Discover is a Reggio inspired program in Denver.
post #26 of 88
I work at a Reggio Inspired centre in Nova Scotia. We have employed this approach for almost 12 years and we send staff to Italy for further insight into this fascinating and beautiful approach to enriching the lives of young children. What I have found in my work is that the children flourish creatively in this environment. There is a strong emphasis on beauty. I find that you can complement this approach easily with Waldorf as well, especailly in terms of using beautiful natural materials.

The Reggio approach is not for every parent, but it will work for almost every child. I say almost because the Reggio environment can be very boisterous at times and may be difficult for children with sensory issues. Otherwise it is a joyous and deep learning environment IMO. I can't wait for our next visit to learn more about the infant and Toddler centres in Reggio-Emilia. They sound so cozy and nurturing.
post #27 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by NHmomOF2
Research yes, but just for myself! I was actually hoping for website links (should've been more specific) as I am in the process of getting my own website up for my home-based Reggio-inspired program I'm starting this fall. Just looking for ideas and such!

Have you got your webstie up yet? I have been interested in R-E for about 7 yrs. I once worked with an art teacher who some of her graduate work at R-E.

I am trying to encorporate some of this into our hsing and with some kids from our hs co-op. My copy of The One Hundred Languages of Children is totally dog-eared. I am thinking to do a study of our city with some of the coop kids this spring.

I am always looking for new inspiration and understanding...
post #28 of 88
This thread is old, but I wanted to add my son's Reggio school. He just started there a few weeks ago and he and I both love it!

www.discoverywoods.org
post #29 of 88
My dd is four and goes to this school: http://www.allaustincoop.org.

She loves her teacher. Her teacher is magical -- creative, responsible, fun. My dd says that there are so many things to do in class every day that it is hard to choose what to do. She asks if we can make home more like school. She goes three days a week for three hours.
post #30 of 88
I'm going to be looking into a Reggio Emilia-based infant day center for our baby to arrive in the spring. We're planning on using them 3 days a week, when he will be 2 months old.

I'm going for an interview/review of the site this afternoon. And basically I'm wondering what questions I should ask and what I should look out for. Does anyone have any recommendations?

It would be great to have this place work out for us, since it is only about 3 blocks from my work and I could probably drop by during lunch to nurse. So keeping my fingers crossed!
post #31 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by NHmomOF2
Research yes, but just for myself! I was actually hoping for website links (should've been more specific) as I am in the process of getting my own website up for my home-based Reggio-inspired program I'm starting this fall. Just looking for ideas and such!
Yeah, there is one in your state! My DD goes there, The Children's Garden in Portsmouth.

It is amazing! My DDs class is the smallest (8). The "teachers" have gone to Italy, blah, blah, blah.
post #32 of 88
I am a teacher at a Reggio inspired preschool. We just got the website up and running, and it really tells it all. Take a look.
http://www.oldfirehouseschool.com/home.html

At our last Teachers' meeting we were discussing how not everything that works in Italy will work in the US, because our cultures are different. They have a very unlitigious society, and the community is very involved. Our culture here in California is different, and so we do some things different. It doesn't mean one is better than the other. The common thread is that we study child development: Jean Piaget, Lev Vytogsky, John Dewey, and more, and strive to nurture the growth and development of our children. We respect the amazing abilities of children, and use gentle guidence to assist the learning.

At our school, we follow a model of primary caregiving and continuity of care. That means that my group will stay together (with a couple of new students added each year as they get older and the ratio increases) until they graduate to Kindergarten. We engage in project work that originates from the children's interests.

We continue to learn from each other, and grow as teachers right along with the children. That is one of the common threads we share with the educators in Italy, the need for us to keep learning.

post #33 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreadmama
At our last Teachers' meeting we were discussing how not everything that works in Italy will work in the US, because our cultures are different. They have a very unlitigious society, and the community is very involved. Our culture here in California is different, and so we do some things different. It doesn't mean one is better than the other.
Yeah, the teacher at our school has been to Italy to see the RE schools there. She was telling me how the children are often allowed to go outside at will. Just can't happen here in the states unless you can have enough adults so that someone can go out with them and maintain a proper adult/child ratio both inside and out. She finds ways to do similar things though. Some parent volunteers built a gated porch off the kitchen so that the kids can indeed go outside. They must stay on the porch so that they are visible through the big kitchen windows, but hey -- they can get into the fresh air!

I love that she goes the extra mile to give the kids as much freedom and experience as possible.
post #34 of 88
Dreadmama, your post has me very excited. Is the continuity of care thing a Reggio concept? I am asking for totally selfish reasons. We adore my daughters' teacher. I mean, we think she is brilliant with little kids. I would like her to teach each of my daughters for several years.

So tell about the same teacher for the students for more than one year!
post #35 of 88
I'm not sure if the continuity of care is a done in Reggio or not. Our focus, in addition to being inspired by the Reggio approach, is Attachment Theory. That is the basis of our work. To faciliate the attachment of the children with their primary caregiver and each other, we all stay together. It is wonderful, because we get to know each other and build from that relationship as we grow, rather than having to start over each year. This is only my second year, but I've seen how nice it is to know some of my children since they were 18 months old, and now they are almost 3. My daughter started at the school when I did and she was 2. She bonded with a little girl in her group last year and now they are inseparable. Both of them are only children, and they act like sisters. They also really love their teacher and it is very sweet to see how close they all are. They know each others needs and wants, and will know just what another child will want to comfort them (like bringing a favorite toy when a child is hurt).

I know that it is very difficult to do here in the US though. For one thing, there is such high turn-over of teachers here due to the low pay, teacher burn-out, low status (people view Preschool teachers as not REAL teachers) etc. Our school came up with a concept of a Staff Stability Fund, which works in our community mostly because the school serves affluent families. They are mostly families where both parents work full-time, so the children are in full-time care. They pay an extra $1,000 /year that goes into a fund. When the children graduate to kindergarten, their teacher receives the Staff Stability money. But if the teacher leaves before the end of that time, then they don't receive the bonus. It is an extra incentive to keep them at the school, and thus retain the attachment.

I know that some schools try to provide at least primary caregiving, but it is difficult to do. When people look for schools, I recommend finding schools that provide primary caregiving and/or continuity of care even more importantly than being a Reggio inspired school. But that is just my opinion.

post #36 of 88
It looks like a wonderful school! How amazing to have a school built upon the concepts of attachment! I LOVE the Mr. Bear goes away project! I bookmarked the site to visit often.
post #37 of 88
The Mr. Bear project reminded me of an incident at my DD's school last year. One of the teacher's frequently brings her dog along, so Bailey is an accepted part of Spring Hollow life. One day, however, Bailey slipped out and was gone. The children had much the same reaction as the ones mentioned in the project and had many questions and hypotheses as to what had happened to Bailey...where he might have gone, what might have happened, what should they do (proactive behavior from 3-5 year olds!). The consensus they came up with was to 1) call for Bailey and 2) make "Lost Dog" signs. Several of the kids rushed inside to find paper and markers to draw their Lost Dog signs, one even drew a map for Bailey to find his way home.

Much rejoicing was had a few minutes later when Bailey was spotted in the neighbor's yard and returned to the fold. It was fascinating to see the kids continue to scaffold the concept of Bailey being "lost" and the proactive measures they could contribute to "finding" him. The discussion continued for weeks afterward and was enveloped into the child-led curriculum so favored by the RE approach.
post #38 of 88
Anyone know of Emilia schools in Westchester NY. I looked at the one link here, but it only had 1 NY school listed, and I know there is more than 1 in the state (I am sure of this b/c my dd's old preschool in our old neighborhood turned to the E.R. approach). Thanks!
post #39 of 88

Maryland Reggio School

My son has attended http://www.lucyschool.com/ for two years, and they are starting an accredited grade school (guarantee up to third grade) next year.

I can't speak highly enough of it. I'm sure as with all methods of education, there are some schools that are not as proficient or dedicated, but when they work, HOLY COW! It is not cheap, but it is so worth it. Many states are now looking into the concept of Charter Schools based upon this philosophy, which I think would be a wonderful thing.
post #40 of 88
tm2840 - My son's teacher and I were just talking about the Lucy School a few days ago! We're thinking of taking a trip up there to see them in action. I'm still looking for options for ds for elementary (he'll be spending "kindergarten") at his current Reggio school and am thrilled with the concept of the Lucy School because he would thrive in a setting centered around the arts (especially drama).

I'd love to hear more about your experience with the school if you have some time.
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