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Obstetrics/Gynecology and Sublimation - Page 4

post #61 of 87
Yeah, but a period on birth control is not actually a period. The only reason the inventors of birth control had the placebo week to allow for bleeding is because they thought women would be too stupid to understand the concept that not having a period does not necessarily mean one is pregnant.
post #62 of 87
If any woman would read the true story behind the development of the birth control pill, no thinking woman would take it...

...during the very first trial, the first group of women to test the birth control pill were poor Puerto Rican women. About a third* of them died in this first study of symptoms that suggested thromboembolism, however no one bothered to follow up and find out WHY these women died. All that mattered was the fact that they were not pregnant, although I do not know if they checked for that either.

When I have told this fact to young women, they say, "Well, the Pills nowadays are different - they have more progesteron, less estrogen..."

Yes, that is true, but how long were the estrogen pills around before the pharmaceuticals decided to change it? How many women died before the estrogen pills were taken off the market, and why was this not tested for before being marketed...?

Women are not guinea pigs.

*Editted to say that the number was not 1/3 of the women but three or five of the women.
post #63 of 87
WoW, I read the first post and then a few others... Geez, I thought I was the only one absolutely turned off by medicine... guess I'm in good company.

Maybe I'll read more later, but right now I have work to do...
post #64 of 87
aj, can you provide a source for the history please? i'm interested in knowing more.

//nak
post #65 of 87
Maybe those pharmacists who are refusing to fill birth control pill prescriptions are doing women a favor, applejuice.
post #66 of 87
Subbing
post #67 of 87
[QUOTE=BensMom]Funny you guys should mention this. This article just ran in a local magazine. This man is proudly admitting to being a discusting, misogynistic, ego-maniac. Our birth network has already contacted the editor and will be following up in other ways, to bring this monster to task. QUOTE]

I just read that article last night and was totally appalled. His "stories" have gotten worse over the years. I can't believe that anyone would choose to see him after reading his garbage. And I just love his full-page ad that is always on the facing page.
post #68 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by klothos
aj, can you provide a source for the history please? i'm interested in knowing more.//nak
I am sorry, but my information in my previous post was wrong, and I will note it...

My sources are Barbara Seaman, "Dangers of Oral Contraceptives", and Dr. Robert Mendelsohn in Male-Practice. I am still looking for my book by Gena Corea.

I admit these are old references. However, the information about the slipshod research done and lack of follow up, and then the FDA approving this medication for half of the American population is very telling as to how women are viewed in this society to this day. Furthermore, reading the insert for any one of the oral contraceptives on the market today will still yield the same side-effects listed below.

The Pill was approved by the FDA in 1960. Women cheered everywhere.

Yet, in 1967, a delegation of Western journalists were granted an interview with Boris Petrovski, the Soviet Minister of Health. Asked why the Pill was not being used in Russia, Dr. Petrovski replied, "We do not want our children born with deformed hands and feet."

The journalists were confused - was Petrovski mixing the Pill up with thalidomide (which was never approved for use in the U.S.)? However, ten years later there were confirmations of a thalidomide-like syndrome in a small number of babies exposed to the hormones of the Pill in the early weeks of the pregnancy especially baby boys. Why did the Russians already know about this and the Americans did not? - Because the drug companies did not tell them, that is why, even though the information was out there.

Barbara Seaman helped to write the book,The Doctor's Case Against the Pill , by Dr. John Schrogie, the FDA's principal expert on the subject. He wanted doctors to stop giving the Pill to women over forty, to women who smoke; he was extremely worried about women having heart attacks while on the Pill.

The original study to test the Pill was done in Puerto Rico on 132 women who took the Pill for at least a year. Most of the other subjects drifted in and out of the program and were lost to follow-up. Three (Dr. Mendelsohn says five) women died during the study of symptoms that suggested a stroke, but no autopsies were performed. Based on this one sloppy study, the Pill was approved for use.

At least they were not pregnant!

Side-effects noted over the years:

embolisms, liver tumors, hemorrhage, gall bladder disease, decrease in GTF, hypertension, amenorrhea, infertility, lower lactation, fluid retention; if present, migrane, asthma, epilepsy may be aggravated; kidney dysfunction, breast tenderness, depression, rash, and a change in the change in the hormone balance of the vagina which makes the woman more vulnerable to STD's.

Every woman taking the Pill should go in every year for a check up to be sure she is not developing any health problems from it and decide whether or not to continue taking it.

However I have known women to take the Pill for several years without a break.

Doctors favorite retort to all of this is "The Pill is safer than a Pregnancy!!"

I hope this helps.
post #69 of 87
thank you for the information.

do you know what the rates are for the occurrences of those possible side effects? from what i know, they are extremely low, but i'd be interested in any evidence to the contrary you might be able to provide.
post #70 of 87
There's another side effect that's not mentioned there. I was on the pill for several years (with annual checkups) from about 15 to about 21. During that time, my sex drive almost completely disappeared. When I went back off the pill (to conceive ds), I was shocked when I realized what it felt like to have a normal sex drive again. I'd just assumed that my "on pill" self was the way I was. I know at least one other girl who said the same thing happened to her. Of course, I never told my doctor, so it's possible this has simply slipped under the research radar.
post #71 of 87
I wonder when colostomy bags will become "fashionable" so we can avoid the inconvience of moving one's bowels...

I think that most women are mislead on the risks vs. benefits of hormonal birth control.
post #72 of 87
has anyone ever read the obgyn.net forums? the professional forums? if anyone ever wants to know what OBs really think, they should go there.

it's all fear of litigation 24/7. everything. even when challenged with evidence-based studies.

oh, and the sexism there is huge. in a recent post, one doctor said that he felt old. another doctor chimed in with "you're only as old as the woman you're feeling".

ugh.
post #73 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by pamamidwife
has anyone ever read the obgyn.net forums? the professional forums? if anyone ever wants to know what OBs really think, they should go there.

it's all fear of litigation 24/7. everything. even when challenged with evidence-based studies.

oh, and the sexism there is huge. in a recent post, one doctor said that he felt old. another doctor chimed in with "you're only as old as the woman you're feeling".

ugh.
wow. That site is absolutely fascinating. It sure does give insight into how they think and their motivations for unnecessary interventions. Scary.

There's a thread there called "Those Crazy VBAC's" (from March 4). Nice. :
post #74 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by pamamidwife
has anyone ever read the obgyn.net forums? the professional forums? if anyone ever wants to know what OBs really think, they should go there.

it's all fear of litigation 24/7. everything. even when challenged with evidence-based studies.

oh, and the sexism there is huge. in a recent post, one doctor said that he felt old. another doctor chimed in with "you're only as old as the woman you're feeling".

ugh.
okay... that is worse than watching a baby story!!
post #75 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by pamamidwife
has anyone ever read the obgyn.net forums? the professional forums? if anyone ever wants to know what OBs really think, they should go there.

it's all fear of litigation 24/7. everything. even when challenged with evidence-based studies.

oh, and the sexism there is huge. in a recent post, one doctor said that he felt old. another doctor chimed in with "you're only as old as the woman you're feeling".

ugh.
I always thought the only reasons drs did anything was because of fear of being sued. Now I have proof

Michelle
post #76 of 87

** went to obgyn.net....

...













hold on...











how about they stop seeing women as troublesome machines that constantly need fixing and instead allow us to tune into our natural rhythms and learn about ourselves WITHOUT the "necessity" of drugs and surgery? how about they recognize that the female body is perfect the way it is, without men or tools to interfere? how about we empower women through education about themselves and the way their bodies are made?

i guess that's not lucrative enough. :
post #77 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marsupialmuma
years ago I had a fabulous female MD her name was Karen Mcarthur..(she moved to conneticut.. anyone in conneticut who needs a female md look her up!) she was very respectful and made a huge difference.
I just looked her up and found her! I have not wanted to have my midwives place my IUD after my birth experience with them so I have been looking for someone else. Now I have a recommendation and will try and set an appt with her. Thank you!!
post #78 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride
There's another side effect that's not mentioned there. I was on the pill for several years (with annual checkups) from about 15 to about 21. During that time, my sex drive almost completely disappeared. When I went back off the pill (to conceive ds), I was shocked when I realized what it felt like to have a normal sex drive again. I'd just assumed that my "on pill" self was the way I was. I know at least one other girl who said the same thing happened to her. Of course, I never told my doctor, so it's possible this has simply slipped under the research radar.
Yeah, they never tell you about that effect. I had practically no sex drive on the pill. None. I have taken it a few times for short periods and it sucks. Some women love it. They can have it. It doesn't make me feel well at all. The Yasmin cleared up my acne after everything else failed but I had no sex drive. Just felt blah. I actually like my natural rythm of hormones during my cycles. Imagine that. I do find it funny how women try to escape from every last thing that makes them feel like a woman, their periods, hormone fluctuations, then they want to get numb for childbirth. Not my thing. I enjoy being a woman tremendously.

Oh, and I have perused the obgyn.net forums. It is enlightening.
post #79 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mara
Yeah, they never tell you about that effect. I had practically no sex drive on the pill. None. I have taken it a few times for short periods and it sucks. Some women love it. They can have it. It doesn't make me feel well at all. The Yasmin cleared up my acne after everything else failed but I had no sex drive. Just felt blah. I actually like my natural rythm of hormones during my cycles. Imagine that. I do find it funny how women try to escape from every last thing that makes them feel like a woman, their periods, hormone fluctuations, then they want to get numb for childbirth. Not my thing. I enjoy being a woman tremendously.
Well, I could do without periods, but only because I inherited cycle-linked migraines from my mom. Although, thankfully, I don't get them anywhere near as badly as she did! Aside from that, there are times I don't like being a woman (like when I simply can't reach something or move something because I'm too short or whatever), but I find pregnancy makes up for most of that.
post #80 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by pamamidwife
obstetrics is for people who want to do surgery, but yet they don't want to be "surgeons" per se - it's a highly surgical field.

I'm always amazed that people don't get that OBs are first and foremost, SURGEONS. to destroy something so you have to surgically piece it back together makes sense if you're a surgeon.

If you don't want to be cut, don't hire a surgeon.


right on.....I like to point out to folks that if you're depressed, it's appropriate to seek help from a psychologist or therapist...you don't need a neurologist!!!!!! Brain surgery if your brain needs it...a wise guide if your mind needs it. Birth rarely needs a surgeon; often can benefit from a wise guide (doula, friend, partner, mw, etc.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thmom
I wonder when colostomy bags will become "fashionable" so we can avoid the inconvience of moving one's bowels...
OMG....totally. Birth is like taking a dump. Privacy is a must, you know when and how to push, you were born knowing how to do it, and even if the poopies vary in size, amount, and consistancy, you're able to squeeze it out each time. AND yes, rarely, there ARE people who need the assitance of MDs in the field to help them poop. But right--does everyone need a colostomy? Like, 27% of people need that 'cause regular pooping is just barbaric, can sometimes hurt, and can stretch a body part (that was MADE to stretch!!!!)

obgyn.net is classic. It's all right there. These sOBs aren't trying to hide anything, when the last thing they should be doing is broadcasting their biases and failings loud and clear.

I thought The Pill was invented by a Catholic, and he thought that including a week of 'period' would be the key to having the Church approve of his birth control invention. I read that in The New Yorker years ago.
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