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What is the most outrageous thing someone has said... - Page 3

post #41 of 299
We are pregnant with our first and this woman in the laundrymat was asking the standard questions etc...so anyway, after finding out we are having a girl she started making the "she is going to be a daddy's girl" comments...which, whatever, if she is, she is, I am sure she will love us both just fine....but she said to me:

"Around 4 or so when she is REALLY and Daddy's girl and doesn't love you anymore, that is when you have another child to keep YOU company"...

Um, yeah, I bring human beings into the world out of jealousy of a father/daughter relationship....


A bit off topic but I was reading the pregnancy forum and one of my BIGGEST pet peeves are the old "you are carrying low/put the ring on a string/you have longer nails/your face is pink/you crave sweets ...you are having a boy/girl..."

Look, the chances of a boy or a girl are roughly about 50/50 (100 girls to 102 boys or something, or maybe that is reversed) so I am sure once in a while the gender wives tale "predictions" come true...but argh, it is SO annoying to me that people still believe that crap...it is one thing to play fun guessing games for FUN, but some people REALLY believe it and strangers will come up to you and even comment and it gets me so much! It is 2005 people!!
post #42 of 299
I've heard a few doozies...

sOB seeing me after going to hospital during my HB, after about 26 hours labour at this point...
[while patting my belly at the same time and I never even knew her name]
"You can't just come in here demanding a caesarean with the first niggling pains of labour!"

How about the head of midwfery in the same hospital saying to me, "Thank you for your feedback. Now that we have a c-sec rate of over 30% we want the OR to be as nice as possible for our ladies."
I said I thought she needed to go back a few paces and fix the fact that they had an outrageous c-sec rate, not just make a pretty environment for the unnecessary ops!

I have a whole list of reasons given for c-secs from another site I'm on (I collected them)

We have to cut you open to get your baby out because....

your feet are too small
your feet are too big
your pelvis is too small
your pelvis is too flat
your hips are too small
you are too skinny
you are too fat
you are too old
you are too young
your uterus is mishapen
your cervix is incompetent
your baby is too small
your baby is too big
your babies are too many
your baby is breech
your baby might have an abnormality
your baby might have a cord issue
your sugar levels are too high
your sugar levels are too low
your blood pressure is too high
your blood pressure is too low
your baby's heart tones are too fast
your baby's heart tones are too slow
the shoulders might get stuck
her head might not mold
your contractions are ineffective
your contractions are too strong
your foot is broken
your spine isn't straight
your baby hasn't dropped
you have too much amniotic fluid
you don't have enough amniotic fluid
your baby has too much blood going to her head.
your uterus only has so many contractions in it before it ruptures/stops labouring
you're too allergic to pain relief for natural birth (WTF??? I was told this one in a shop)
you'll never go into labour (I wish I owned that crystal ball)
you're 7 days overdue
the baby had trouble getting in, it might have trouble getting out (mama had fertility issues)
post #43 of 299
at a bloodwork appt with a gyn, the nurse was retaking my birth history. i told her my last baby had been born at home. the next thing she asks: so, was he born vaginally or by cesarean? and this is a hb-friendly practice....guess it had been a long day

nothing like those home cesareans!
post #44 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgia
at a bloodwork appt with a gyn, the nurse was retaking my birth history. i told her my last baby had been born at home. the next thing she asks: so, was he born vaginally or by cesarean? and this is a hb-friendly practice....guess it had been a long day

nothing like those home cesareans!
:LOL
post #45 of 299
Someone was telling me that her daughter was having a planned c-section for her second child, "since she'd had to have a section for her first." I asked if there was some permanent damage from her first birth or something, and she said no, just that you always have to have c-sections once you've had a c-section: "Yes, it's just common medical knowledge. It's not good for the babies to have a natural birth if the first baby was born by c-section. All doctors know this." I said, "Wow, really? All doctors say that?" And she said, "Yes. It's a medical fact."

I let it go. What do you say to that? :

A doctor of someone in my birth class with my first pregnancy told her that he wished he could give all mothers in labor an epidural, let them sleep, and wake them up and tell them to cough when they hit 10 centimeters -- there was no reason at all to let women go through labor pain.
post #46 of 299
Medical fact huh? I don't know if I could of let that one go! Man, can't believe people actually believe this stuff...
post #47 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiddledebi
A doctor of someone in my birth class with my first pregnancy told her that he wished he could give all mothers in labor an epidural, let them sleep, and wake them up and tell them to cough when they hit 10 centimeters -- there was no reason at all to let women go through labor pain.
Actually, that sounds like a sweet doctor. Now I know epidural have risks, I just mean that he seemed to sympathize with the pain women go through. That's much better than a jerk of a doctor that doesn't understand all the noises you may make during a natural birth (And tell you that you need to be quiet.) because they either don't care, or don't understand about the pain.

This one is about birth, but it still gets me to this day. I don't know how anyone can think this wasn't a rude thing to say. I was in a store with my first born when she was just weeks old. Two older women came up to me and kept commenting on how beautiful she was. Then one said to me, "She must look like her father." Thanks lady.
post #48 of 299
At my 10 week appointment, my OB noticed that I had mentioned to the nurse that I was having some bleeding from my gums. He took the time out of his oh, so very busy schedule to mention that pregnant women shouldn't swish with listerine because the alcohol in the mouth wash could cause their babies to have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

I will be SO happy when the insurance finally straightens out and I can fire that man.
post #49 of 299
i had gestational diabetes and once i started going in for NSTs and ultrasounds at the end of the pregnancy, i kept hearing the most lame-ass statements (from staff who'd never met me before):

"so, when are we going to induce you?" uh, NEVER.

"so, when are we going to deliver you?" : what am i, a pizza??
post #50 of 299
On a similar vein to mellybean, when I was 41 weeks with my 3rd, my family doc asked me to get an NST. When I got to the hospital, the resident instead insisted on doing a biophysical profile - telling me "I'll fudge and make your fluid low if you want so you can be induced." Yeah, that's what I want. Falsely give me a non-existing condition so I can force my doc into an induction I don't want. Then he told me that the way the fluid looked, there was almost certainly meconium in the fluid.
Ds was born, in his own time, 2 days dater, with no meconium or any problem at all.

The last time I was pregnant, for some reason everyone around me the whole last month kept saying things like "You must be so tired" and "Bet you can't wait to get that baby out of there" and my favorite "Are you STILL pregnant?" No, idiot, I had the baby last week, I left her at home, stuffed a basketball under my shirt and came to work anyway, YES, I'm STILL pregnant.
And I birthed that baby right on her due date, so it's not like I was pregnant all that long. No one could understand that I was really enjoying my last pregnancy ever, and was in no hurry to get the baby out.
post #51 of 299
the most outrageous thing anyone said to me, and it was said by more people than I can count:

"you are so lucky you were in the hospital. You were so lucky your doctor wasn't on call and you had a doctor who does so many c-sections. He saved your baby's life."
post #52 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by mellybean
"so, when are we going to deliver you?" : what am i, a pizza??
That is one of the BEST comebacks I've read yet. I wish you had really said that to her. :LOL I always hated the phrase, the doctor/midwife/CNA/nurse/husband/etc delivered the baby, anyway. The MOTHER delivers the baby, the others are just helpers.
post #53 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belleweather
At my 10 week appointment, my OB noticed that I had mentioned to the nurse that I was having some bleeding from my gums. He took the time out of his oh, so very busy schedule to mention that pregnant women shouldn't swish with listerine because the alcohol in the mouth wash could cause their babies to have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

I will be SO happy when the insurance finally straightens out and I can fire that man.
I doubt that I'm the only one that's amazed at how some of these people actually become doctors, and more so that some put them right up there with God and believe every bit of drivel that comes out of their mouths. : Sad for all those mamas and babies.
post #54 of 299
When we were planning for a UC I went very overdue. Suddenly my ILs realized that we really did not mean to consult with an OB unless absolutely necessary (and we obviously had differing opinions about what constituted "necessary). It wasn't just a lark...la dee da, let's have our baby at home...

So my FIL had "a talk" with dh. Dh reminded his dad that woman were having babies at home forever until recently. To which FIL replied, "And that's why the graveyards were filled with tiny coffins."

I am very appreciative of my dh for not sharing that story with me until after the birth.
post #55 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjen
Then he told me that the way the fluid looked, there was almost certainly meconium in the fluid.
Ds was born, in his own time, 2 days dater, with no meconium or any problem at all.
That is so strange. I got a call from a woman a few weeks ago - she had had 5 normal pregnancies and then a stillbirth at 35 weeks for no apparent reason. Her OB was anxious to induce her at 38 weeks b/c of the prior stillbirth. She refused. So at 40 weeks they do a BPP and tell her that she MUST be induced (but not for 2 days when they can get her on the schedule) b/c on u/s they can see 'there is meconium in the fluid'. I said I had never, EVER heard of such a thing while working almost 5 years in L&D. I really thought it sounded bogus. Anyway, she went in for induction - which they began by rupturing her membranes and releasing totally CLEAR fluid. Is this some new idiot trend? "we can see mec on u/s"?
post #56 of 299
I had a woman tell me that she would never have a hb because her son was born at the hospital and after they cut the cord he had trouble breathing and of course would have died if they were at home.

I said, "Wow that sounds scary. I sure am glad that my mw leaves the cord intact so that my son will continue to receive oxygen rich blood until the placenta delivers. And of course she is lisenced so she has resusitation equipment if he has any breathing problems."
post #57 of 299
I posted this some months ago in another thread.

My nephew was born in our local hospital (8lbs 10 oz) by c-section. I was standing in the birth-center lobby waiting for my sister-in-law to get her epidural prior to her c-section. I was standing next to my father-in-law (I was 7 months pregnant at the time and planning a homebirth) and my SIL's Dr. was filling out paper-work behind the counter.

My FIL looked at me and said "Well, you are going to have to break that c-section curse when you have your baby". (His prior other grandchildren had also been born via c-section). My SIL's Dr. looked up, looked at my pregnant belly and said "Don't count on it...all those boys in that family (meaning my DH's) have huge heads." and went back to filling out paperwork.

I was both furious and scared. This was my first baby and this man who was not my Dr. had just said that he predicted a c-section for me. Well, after much reassurance by my MW I had my great big baby with his great big head at home and I sent the Dr. a birth announcement with all the stats of DS's size on it in bold letters . Sheesh...
post #58 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2six
That is so strange. I got a call from a woman a few weeks ago - she had had 5 normal pregnancies and then a stillbirth at 35 weeks for no apparent reason. Her OB was anxious to induce her at 38 weeks b/c of the prior stillbirth. She refused. So at 40 weeks they do a BPP and tell her that she MUST be induced (but not for 2 days when they can get her on the schedule) b/c on u/s they can see 'there is meconium in the fluid'. I said I had never, EVER heard of such a thing while working almost 5 years in L&D. I really thought it sounded bogus. Anyway, she went in for induction - which they began by rupturing her membranes and releasing totally CLEAR fluid. Is this some new idiot trend? "we can see mec on u/s"?
Supposedly it looks cloudy and if its really thick has particles. Supposedly. I would think vernix would look like particles too. Can't imagine how accurate it can be. They can't even detect gender 100% of the time, like the consistency of the fluid is gonna be anywhere near accurate?
post #59 of 299
Dh had an appointment with a rheumatologist late in my first pg. He was having some symptoms of autoimmune illness at the time. Anyway, he's fine now. A nurse came in the room and saw that I was pregnant. She told me to absolutely "get the epidural." Then she went on to say that I should actually opt for a c-section. She had one with her first and would do the same with the next because "it was so easy." Dh and I were pretty much speechless, since we'd been planning a natural birth from the beginning. Anyway, even though it was 2.5 weeks from my EDD, I had a happy, healthy baby girl in my arms the next morning. She was born with my awesome mw in an awesome hospital 20 minutes after we arrived! I felt like tracking that nurse down and telling her a thing or two!
post #60 of 299
After the meconium scare for myself, I talked with a couple different experienced ultrasonographers about this. Apparently, particulate meconium can make the fluid appear more, well, particulate, on ultrasound - but so can vernix, and vernix is far more likely. The head of MFM where I trained said he would never make such a diagnosis or suggest such a thing. Regardless, meconium is sort of a non-issue unless something else is going on.
When I was admitted in labor with that same baby, I had to initially be evaluated by a (different) resident. This one insisted on doing another ultrasound for size of all things, and fluid levels - even though I was in active labor and had just had the stupid thing done two days before. I was sort of busy concentrating on being in labor, and couldn't somehow muster the ability to argue with him. My dh was waiting outside with my older ds, because another woman was having a big panic attack in the triage area with me, and the staff didn't want my ds in there. This resident made a big point of telling me the baby was "at least 8 1/2 lb" which at the time scared me - my previous biggest baby was 7 lbs 11 oz, and I pushed for 2 hours with him. I actually really enjoyed this labor once I got rid of the residents, but I spent a lot of time thinking about my meconium stained, giant baby in there while laboring. Prior to that, I had been sure that the baby was bigger than my dd, but smaller than my older ds. In the end, my water broke just before I was ready to push, the fluid was nice and clear, but full of vernix, and the baby was 7 lbs 9 oz - bigger than dd and smaller than ds.
I later had my 8lb 15 oz dd without a bit of problem, so turns out I didn't need to worry about the size thing anyway, but geez, what is the point of trying to scare a poor laboring woman anyway. I never make size comments like that. If people try to pin me down, I usually persist in saying "It's a nice normal size baby" because thinking you have to push out a giant baby helps no one, least of all the mama who is blessed with a nice, big baby!
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