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Brooke Shields/PPD on Oprah

post #1 of 102
Thread Starter 
I'm not normally an Oprah watcher, but I saw an ad today that Brooke Shields is going to be on tomorrow (I think) talking about her experience with PPD. I read an interview with her (Shields) and it was very interesting. I think it's great that someone in the public eye is coming out and talking about the actual thoughts and feelings associated with PPD- the disassociated, disconnected feeling-- and explaining that it's more than just being "tired" or having "the baby blues."

I'm going to try to remember to watch.

Leigh
post #2 of 102
yeah I plan on watching it too if I can get back from my midwife appointment fast enough! I can't be chatty tomorrow!

Although I am not pleased that Brooke is a spokesperson for formula (grrr)...I do think it is a good thing that she is coming out about PPD and will most likely watch...
post #3 of 102
I'll have to watch today. I was also very, umm, disappointed at her formula commercials and kind of disliked her after that. But being a PPD momma, I am interested in what her experience was like. I saw her book about her PPD in the bookstore yesterday. I would never buy it, but I will tune in to hear her interview. Thanks for the info!
post #4 of 102
A friend of mine is going to be one of the people on the panel. Her name is Diana I'll be watching, though I don't suffer from PPD. I'm interested to see what has to be said about it though. Namaste, Tara
post #5 of 102
Her pre-birth and birth experience mirrors my own so much it is frightening. She is expressing thoughts I was always too ashamed to voice. I am so glad she is doing this.
post #6 of 102
I forgot and only got to Tivo it starting late so I missed the beginning of her story... can anyone tell me why she had the c/s in the first place?
post #7 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaTaraX
A friend of mine is going to be one of the people on the panel. Her name is Diana I'll be watching, though I don't suffer from PPD. I'm interested to see what has to be said about it though. Namaste, Tara
I didnt see a panel?

They didnt go into much detail but her water broke and then she was induced.. and then an emergency c section. I think she also said that her uterous herniated?
post #8 of 102
Wow, I watched it and I was very impressed at how candid, and honest she was! I think she came across as very intelligent, very real, and didn't seem to hold anything back.

I am not a therapist at all, but after hearing about her birth experience, it is understandable to me why she suffered from PPD (though I know people who have great births can suffer too!)...

I think her experience will help a lot of women who (as mentioned) are too ashamed or embarrassed to put words to how they feel.
post #9 of 102
I don't like anyone who does formula commercials.
post #10 of 102
I don't see how that's relevent to the discussion. Like her or not, she is trying to be a much needed voice. I admire her for having the courage to speak out about something that is so often blown off because "baby blues" are common in new mothers. Common as it may be, it's not spoken about enough. I know I felt very invalidated the first few weeks after my son's birth. "Oh, you just have the baby blues" is not helpful in any way whatsoever. There needs to be more education for new mothers and fathers about how to cope with PPD.

Not that it makes much of a difference, she did say she breastfed.
post #11 of 102
Maybe Brooke's PPD was comprised mostly of advance guilt about how she'd go on to promote the joy of formula to millions of magazine readers and tv watchers. Great that she's candid about PPD but WHAT a big missed opportunity to promote baby's best food - mama's milk. We need more celeb mom boobies in the limelight...ahem, in the latched-on limelight.

IMO the fact she bf'd doesn't help...if anything, that should show that she knows ff isn't the same.
post #12 of 102
Quote:
Maybe Brooke's PPD was comprised mostly of advance guilt about how she'd go on to promote the joy of formula to millions of magazine readers and tv watchers.
wow. how mean. i dont like that she did formula commercials either but that isnt a reason to feel good about the fact that she had such a horrible bout with PPD. I wouldnt wish that on ANYONE.
post #13 of 102
I am kinda of disgusted that you think she is so horrible for representing a formula company -- sorry but I don't discount or dislike someone for this reason. In fact when I FF my son, the one we adopted because nursing wasn't working out, I used formula, and I used :::Gasp::: Nestle.

Mothers with PPD and often first time mothers have difficulty nursing and need to supplement with formula. I've watched friends, HUGE breastfeeding advocates mind you, have to supplement because they did not have the supply to meet the demand. They often sent husbands to fetch their formula just in case some judgemental friend or aquaintance might see them.

Yes, Brooke Shields breastfed, and she formula fed. Last I check its not a sin to FF -- yep, we know its not the best but at times it may be best with mommy is whacked out on PPD and can barely stand to hold her baby much less latch them to their breast, mommy may have milk supply issues, or whatever.

I watched Brooke today and I plan to buy her book. I related to alot of what she said, I also understood everything she felt about her birth experience, and what followed. I was in tears that someone could be so candid and honest with the world about things that are so personaly and terrifying.

As for why she had a csection, she had planned this o so wonderful natural birth, her water broke but she never went into labor, so the next day she was induced -- the induction was not working, and her baby had heart decels and was not handling the induction well. Her uterus was herniated, which was discovered after she went in for her csection and her baby had the cord wrapped around her neck and then it was also tightly wrapped around her arm shoulder and leg in some weird fashion. She had a horrific csection experience -- in fact she said in her book "i was gutted like a fish on a crucifix".
post #14 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by rado
Maybe Brooke's PPD was comprised mostly of advance guilt about how she'd go on to promote the joy of formula to millions of magazine readers and tv watchers. Great that she's candid about PPD but WHAT a big missed opportunity to promote baby's best food - mama's milk. We need more celeb mom boobies in the limelight...ahem, in the latched-on limelight.

IMO the fact she bf'd doesn't help...if anything, that should show that she knows ff isn't the same.
I cant believe I just read this. I find this disgusting and sick you would say this about anyone, no matter who they are. :
post #15 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by rado
Maybe Brooke's PPD was comprised mostly of advance guilt about how she'd go on to promote the joy of formula to millions of magazine readers and tv watchers. Great that she's candid about PPD but WHAT a big missed opportunity to promote baby's best food - mama's milk. We need more celeb mom boobies in the limelight...ahem, in the latched-on limelight.

IMO the fact she bf'd doesn't help...if anything, that should show that she knows ff isn't the same.

That was a nasty thing to say, IMO. I wondered if she formula fed because she could not feel enough attachment to her baby to breastfeed her. I think her story is so sad, & she was BRAVE to come out & talk about it, & the reactions like this one are probably why so many women try to hide their feelings.
post #16 of 102
I missed the show. Darn. Yes, I agree that it was sad to see her making a commercial for formula, yet, now we may have a little window into perhaps some of her reasoning. My understanding is that often when women are suffering from bad ppd they are definately having milk supply issues or just unable to keep nursing as much as a baby demands. Her understanding of this could have been a factor in promoting formula.
I, too had planned a wonderful natural birth, ended up with an emergency section and suffered from ppd yet stayed in denial of it for months! With my second child, attempted vbac turned section, I went thru the ppd yet that time was ready to see it and got help. MOre women like Brooke should always tell their story so people can be helped.
No-one ever has any right to judge a woman who is trying her best to be a good mom while being treated for ppd. Walk a mile in her shoes. BETCHA CANT
~L
post #17 of 102
I think it's really fabulous that she is putting herself out there so much with this.
I've seen her picture everywhere lately, all the magazines at the stores, her book, tv shows, everywhere. And all to bring attention to ppd! I think it's awsome.
post #18 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahNH
And all to bring attention to ppd! I think it's awsome.

This is pretty crappy, but I would imagine it has a fair amount to do with the money she is making.... kind of like the formula ad.....

That said, I did see her on Oprah today and thought she was pretty courageous to admit the things she did.
post #19 of 102
I recall that Marie Osmond wrote a book about her PPD, and I believe that Brooke is also.

We need to let others know that just because a woman has alot going for her that does not mean she will not suffer from a chemical, emotional or post birth trauma...birth needs to be seen as a time when women need help in every aspect of their being.
post #20 of 102
She switched to ff'ing becuase the meds she ended up on for the PPD were not compatable for bf'ing. I know someone will counter that with there are other meds out there, but I do not know specifically what med she was on and not every med will work for every person.

Alot of women suffer from PPD due to these hard core militant bf'ing women who look down on, are rude and judgemental to other people's situation.

She had a bad miscarriage, went through a horrific birth, suffered from severe PPD and subconsciously was asking for help but it was over a month before anyone else listened to her. Her thoughts on not wanting to be around her baby, on walking out, on the baby not living with her were poo-poo'd by her friends and family. IMO the key message anyone should get from watching Oprah and those who may read/borrow her book(or any other book on PPD) is for everyone to be on the watch for PPD to catch the signs before it turns into the next case of a mom killing her children. FF'ing vs BF'ing has no spot in this discussion. Once she got help she made a choice that was best for her and her child. It may not be the idea choice or the choice that another would make but it is still her choice to make. Being judgemental to someone does not give emotional support that new mothers(especially first time mothers) need. Supporting a mother in her choices helps to decrease their chance of PPD. When you are judgemental towards a person's choice you are pushing them and telling them what they are doing is wrong. You push that "ideal perfect mother" syndrome onto them and their confidence and self esteem lowers, they start thinking that everything they do is not good enough.
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