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Waldorf Lazuring children's walls? - Page 4

post #61 of 122

Lazure Step by Step?

I have a couple questions for those who have Lazured their walls already.
I've read a couple of different ways to do it. Dh and I are NOT painters so the easier the better

Which way is better? I've read 2 different ways so far...

1. On a dry wall, take a damp sponge, dip in paint, spread on the walls.
2. Wet the walls with a damp sponge, then dip damp sponge in paint, spread on the walls.

Also I've read about watering down the paint. Is this necessary if you wet the walls beforehand? If you water the paint down...how much paint and how much water do you use? About how much would I need to cover a 11x13 room? 1 cup, 1 pt, 1 gallon? I'm going to be doing 3 colors.

If I don't water down the paint how much would I use for a 11x13 room? 1 cup, 1 pt, 1 gallon? I'm going to be doing 3 colors.

Sorry so many questions...I'm one of those who needs a step by step guide
post #62 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by treehugginhippie View Post
I have a couple questions for those who have Lazured their walls already.
I've read a couple of different ways to do it. Dh and I are NOT painters so the easier the better

Which way is better? I've read 2 different ways so far...

1. On a dry wall, take a damp sponge, dip in paint, spread on the walls.
2. Wet the walls with a damp sponge, then dip damp sponge in paint, spread on the walls.

Also I've read about watering down the paint. Is this necessary if you wet the walls beforehand? If you water the paint down...how much paint and how much water do you use? About how much would I need to cover a 11x13 room? 1 cup, 1 pt, 1 gallon? I'm going to be doing 3 colors.

If I don't water down the paint how much would I use for a 11x13 room? 1 cup, 1 pt, 1 gallon? I'm going to be doing 3 colors.

Sorry so many questions...I'm one of those who needs a step by step guide
I'd love to answer these questions but honestly I can't. I used the Aglaia paint that is especially designed for Lazure painting, and the beeswax glaze, which I mixed pigments with for colour - all Aglaia.

To paint with I used a tack brush, as in the kind you brush a horse with - the ones made from horsehair - they're the softest.

Honestly I don't know how well it would work with opaque colours, it's meant to be done with glazes so that the colours can blend together.

I found that using a sponge didn't work at all because of how thin the glaze is, it just ran down the wall.

This might not have been helpful at all, I'm sorry.
post #63 of 122
Thanks for the reply chasmyn I would like try and use just regular paint. Anyone else lazured their walls?


Quote:
Originally Posted by chasmyn View Post
I'd love to answer these questions but honestly I can't. I used the Aglaia paint that is especially designed for Lazure painting, and the beeswax glaze, which I mixed pigments with for colour - all Aglaia.

To paint with I used a tack brush, as in the kind you brush a horse with - the ones made from horsehair - they're the softest.

Honestly I don't know how well it would work with opaque colours, it's meant to be done with glazes so that the colours can blend together.

I found that using a sponge didn't work at all because of how thin the glaze is, it just ran down the wall.

This might not have been helpful at all, I'm sorry.
post #64 of 122
I think the improtant thing is that you can see through the layers. Otherwise they're kind of lost, yk?

When we did the bedroom, we got the walls wet first and used watered down paint. It really stretches the paint pretty far that way, and you can definitely see through the layers. We used grout sponges and it worked ok, but next time I'd use something that holds the water/paint a bit better. We used on the order of a cup to a pint of paint per color, definitely no more.

Did you see my post earlier in the thread? I have a page up that gives you the step-by-step of what I did.
post #65 of 122
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post #66 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoMe View Post
I think the improtant thing is that you can see through the layers. Otherwise they're kind of lost, yk?

When we did the bedroom, we got the walls wet first and used watered down paint. It really stretches the paint pretty far that way, and you can definitely see through the layers. We used grout sponges and it worked ok, but next time I'd use something that holds the water/paint a bit better. We used on the order of a cup to a pint of paint per color, definitely no more.

Did you see my post earlier in the thread? I have a page up that gives you the step-by-step of what I did.
Thanks for your response. Your description makes sense. Good to know about the grout sponge. I guess I'll get a large sponge that wouldn't be as pourous?? The room you did looks really nice.
post #67 of 122

Keep It Going!

I'm so happy to see this thread. We are getting ready to paint and thinking about making our own and styles. I love the lazure! I wonder if you can do it with homemade clay or flour paints?
Anyone????
post #68 of 122
still nothing about the age appropriate colors??? i searched this whole thread adn can't find anything....
post #69 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilikethedesert View Post
I wonder if you can do it with homemade clay or flour paints?
Anyone????
We used bioshield clay paint, and it worked great. If your homemade paint is similar, I don't see any reason why it wouldn't work
post #70 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by mothertoall View Post
still nothing about the age appropriate colors??? i searched this whole thread adn can't find anything....
I searched the whole thread and cannot find your original post. Can you repeat your question? :
post #71 of 122
i want to do this in my newto be house.. especially for my sons room and the livingroom. he Really wants a blue bedroom so im torn between staying with the peachy warm colours or doing what he wants..
im also planning on using regular paint (no VOC) and water..

a question.. is the beeswax for a finish once its done?
post #72 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by brownay2 View Post
Something about the colors depending on the child's age is a factor also.
I became curious about this subject so I googled it. Someone else may have even more luck, I am usually not so handy with google. I found two sites...

Colours for living and learning

Quote:
Colour through age development
There is a cycle of changing colours that affects our mind and body through the different stages of life. These are reflected in our changing colour preferences. Children have colour likes and dislikes according to individual character and stage of development.

Over a hundred years ago the pioneering educationalist Rudolph Steiner believed that people were surrounded by particular colours that had a spiritual influence and objective effect on their emotional life as well as benefiting physical health and mental well-being. Followers of the Steiner philosophy introduced his principles into their networks of schools and communities. It was believed that surrounding children with soft pastels and rounded architectural forms at the kindergarten level (2-7 years), progressing to central shared learning areas with stronger more vibrant colours for older children (7-10 years) then onto larger shared work areas in which soft greens and blues were used for children from 10 into their teenage years, was less distracting to the mental concentration of each stage of development.
...there's a lot more immediately after that paragraph...

and a pdf in html form, Organic Functionalism: An Important Principle of the Visual Arts in Waldorf School Crafts and Architecture

Quote:
Appropriate classroom murals, wall pictures, and colors should also
change through the grades, as described by Steiner.
36
For example, the walls of the first-grade
classroom would be painted in warmer, reddish colors and feature images from fairy tales. By
contrast, the walls of the sixth-grade room would be painted in cooler, bluish colors and feature
images of the individual human being, especially a human being in nature (“a man standing in a
landscape in sunshine or rain; or a small lake with a man rowing on it,” suggested Steiner).
... there is way more in this document as well but it jumps around quite a bit, and addresses many other subjects as well.
post #73 of 122
Does anyone know how it looks if you use two opposite colors such as yellow & violet, red & green, blue & orange?

If I've missed something and you paint when the last coat is still a bit wet, that could be unappealing If the previous coat is dry it might make a neat effect. Maybe.
post #74 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaFern View Post
i want to do this in my newto be house.. especially for my sons room and the livingroom. he Really wants a blue bedroom so im torn between staying with the peachy warm colours or doing what he wants..
im also planning on using regular paint (no VOC) and water..

a question.. is the beeswax for a finish once its done?
The beeswax glaze that I used is made specifically for Lazure painting. It's made by Aglaia. A white base coat is painted with Aglaia casein binder paint, then pigments are mixed with the beeswax and applied in thin layers to create the colours.
post #75 of 122
Chasmyn, how/where did you learn so much about lazuring?
post #76 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by sphinxie View Post
Chasmyn, how/where did you learn so much about lazuring?
Lots of Googling

Also I read the websites of the professionals. They all use Aglaia, so I looked into it, and then bought and used it myself. Not cheap but instead of smelling like paint, it smells like eucalyptus and thyme. :

Also, you learn when you're doing it, too.
post #77 of 122
I checked out the Aglaia site and it really is informative. But the color charts: any ideas on what to mix to get the peach blossom color? http://www.beeck.de/english/produkte.../FKKFPK_EN.pdf

I also have latex paint on my walls currently. I know I'd need the primer, but would I have to sand the latex paint down first so the primer adheres? Hmmm...
post #78 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by kellybelly View Post
I checked out the Aglaia site and it really is informative. But the color charts: any ideas on what to mix to get the peach blossom color? http://www.beeck.de/english/produkte.../FKKFPK_EN.pdf

I also have latex paint on my walls currently. I know I'd need the primer, but would I have to sand the latex paint down first so the primer adheres? Hmmm...
No, not at all. We just used the casein binder paint over the latex that was here before.

To get peach, we mixed ultramarine red and lemon yellow.
post #79 of 122
Thank you, chasmyn! That is exactly what I wanted to know. I wonder how it would look if I did a coat of sheer yellow, then a coat of the mixed peach, and top it off with a sheer pink? I don't know if we'll do a gradiation, but maybe those layers will add visual interest? I have no idea.
post #80 of 122
Yes, that would be perfect. The more layers, the letter, I think - and make sure they're thin. That way you can really perfect the look.
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