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Dishonest/evasive waldorf teacher... - Page 2

post #21 of 186
Wow guys... I really appreciate everyone's support. After three years this is the first time I've put it all out there... for many reasons. No, the school is not in a third world country.

As a trained Waldorf teacher AND Anthroposophist ( to this day I belong to ASA) I have to say I am able to see all of the good sides to Waldorf as well, and my training had caused me to meet "Waldorfians" from all over the U.S. and world. Of course I can see the good Waldorf does every day. This thread was about very real concerns, which are just as relevant and real.

Waldorf has established its own reputation all by itself... both good and bad.

I think what you, Pete, and the others are saying is fair and true, and we all need and deserve a safe place to hash it out and get our heads straight. I think this forum is the perfect place for that... :

Thank you once again so so much for believing my family and myself and for making this a safe, healing place for these discussions, vent sessions (healthy), supportive virtual coffee house chats, etc...... Thank you, too, for sharing the "other side" of the Waldorf story, too, to help us maintain balance respectfully.

Again "Thank you" is not enough....

Most sincerely,
B.
post #22 of 186
Sorry, I'm a little "slow" today.

After re-reading one of the posts I realize it was perfectly relevant to speak "about" the other person to the group in defense and understanding that his views are real and legitimate. Thus, I edited my request that we not do that out of my original message...

This "slowness" is a very real side effect of dealing with the Waldorf dysfunsctional side: I get a bit hazy and burnt out when I talk about it. I guess it's a defense mechanism...

Thanks again, everybody.
Bea
post #23 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by beansavi
I get a bit hazy and burnt out when I talk about it. I guess it's a defense mechanism...

Maybe a defense mechanism to protect your self from your own self-doubt!


I say that because a lack of validation from others, when dealing with a controversial situation such as this, can often lead us to question ourselves; our perceptions, our reactions, our beliefs. We might be tempted to comply with external pressures to belittle our own cause.

That is why it is imperative that we speak up here. By speaking our truths we are affirming each other's truths and helping each other gain clarity and, more importantly, confidence in our own intuition.
post #24 of 186

secrecy

I know the situation Beansavi went through firsthand, and it was unexcuseable...the closed mouth policy that was so pervasive throughout the school didn't end among the faculty/board *vs* the parents.

I had an awful experirnce of humiliation when asking for financial assistance. I was sent an insulting letter, telling me that my husband should do better in supporting the family (we both work) when i raised a little cain about the tone and approach they had taken, even tried to calmly discuss it with the TA committee, I was sent a letter telling me that if i talked about my situation to *anyone* in or outside of the school, we would be excluded from the school, kicked out of the fold so to speak.

I know these are different issues and i know all schools aren't the same, in fact the older ones are more likely to have it all figured out, it's the secrecy that is like a deadly virus that invades the whole system. It hasn't done much in the way of increasing my support of the Waldorf communities. There is no excuse for such secrecy, there is no excuse for sending out letters of a threatening nature, there is no excuse for the punishment Beansavi went through.

I quieted down bc i wanted my son to get through third grade,( which i was told was a good transition point into more mainstream schooling and he still had to repeat a grade...i later learn that it is fifth grade but that is beside the point) In other words, i sacrificed my values for my sons best interest, and in that same case would do it all over again for him, but why??why should i have to be quiet and dumb myself down??

Why should Beansavi have to jump through all of those hoops just for her kids, only to be fired anyway?...they were trying to drive her out all along and when it didn't work, they kept raising the stakes (that isn't very GD)

Sorry for the rant, it's just that i know the situation first hand and am angry at how my friend was treated, not to mention how i (and others that i haven't mentioned) have been treated. I feel now like i've lost my community. I was a committed WS parent, and would've moved to get DS through 8th grade and high school. I felt very bitter, but have now moved on and watch as the school goes through more sh&*t. I truly wish the best for them, and i hope upon all hopes that most WSs don't operate in this manner.
post #25 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by BelovedK
I quieted down bc i wanted my son to get through third grade,( which i was told was a good transition point into more mainstream schooling and he still had to repeat a grade...i later learn that it is fifth grade but that is beside the point) In other words, i sacrificed my values for my sons best interest, and in that same case would do it all over again for him, but why??why should i have to be quiet and dumb myself down??

Wow. I've had the exact same experience. And I just recently pulled the plug. We're going to homeschool - never going back to the WS. It's sad, but liberating at the same time. And I feel more dignity by honoring my truth. (My oldest is entering 5th grade and my youngest is entering his 2nd year of kindergarten. I didn't know that about the timing, but I'm grateful to hear that it is considered a good time to transition.)





Quote:
Originally Posted by BelovedK
I feel now like i've lost my community. I was a committed WS parent, and would've moved to get DS through 8th grade and high school. I felt very bitter, but have now moved on and watch as the school goes through more sh&*t. I truly wish the best for them, and i hope upon all hopes that most WSs don't operate in this manner.


Unfortunately, I'm learning that this problem is not exclusive to our local Waldorf school.
post #26 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete
I forgot to ask, out of curiosity, and if you don't mind saying so, how did you all do? Did you all go to college, graduate college? Did you feel adequately prepared for college? What kind of careers did you end up in? Did Waldorf prepare you for your careers? Just curious - I'd love to think I have misconceptions about this. Thanks!

Pete
I don't mind. All of us have done very well. My brother and I graduated from college; he is an artist and computer maven, I was a HS English teacher (public) for many years and am currently a writer and sahm. My sister has 2 years of college and is co-founder of the Utilikilts Company in Seattle. She's also a musician and writer.

We were all adequately prepared for college, in part I think because we grew up as voracious readers in a house with no tv (something my parents decided before sending us to a Waldorf school, by the way). And also because we went to an academically excellent high school. I know of few people who feel that their elementary/high school education "prepared" them for their careers, myself included, so I can't really address that. I think that what prepared us best for the careers we have was our innate interests, graduate education, and life experience - for example, it was as a volunteer in the Peace Corps in Morocco that I first realized I had a knack for teaching.

As we agree, there are all different kinds of WS atmospheres. But I want to stress again, that at mine there was no expectation that non-Waldorf kids wouldn't be a social events, etc. Most of the students at my school were from very mainstream families. Not having a tv made my sibs and I real freaks! There's everyone talking at recess about the Fonz (ok, I'm dating myself!) and I'm wondering who the heck this character is...
post #27 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by May May
It's sad, but liberating at the same time. And I feel more dignity by honoring my truth.










Unfortunately, I'm learning that this problem is not exclusive to our local Waldorf school.
I feel the exact same way.
Isn't that sad??? It seems that the schools need to evolve the administrative structure to even meet the expectations of Steiner who never intended the WS or Anthroposophy to be static, it was intended to evolve with the times. Unfortunately they are losing some great families and teachers.
post #28 of 186
Thank you so much for this. It sounds like you were each very successful. It helps to know that there really are some good Waldorf schools out there. And, everyone should take note. Each person's experience with Waldorf really, really depends on the individual school, and on the participant's preparedness and expectations.

Pete

Quote:
Originally Posted by zinemama
I don't mind. All of us have done very well. My brother and I graduated from college; he is an artist and computer maven, I was a HS English teacher (public) for many years and am currently a writer and sahm. My sister has 2 years of college and is co-founder of the Utilikilts Company in Seattle. She's also a musician and writer.

We were all adequately prepared for college, in part I think because we grew up as voracious readers in a house with no tv (something my parents decided before sending us to a Waldorf school, by the way). And also because we went to an academically excellent high school. I know of few people who feel that their elementary/high school education "prepared" them for their careers, myself included, so I can't really address that. I think that what prepared us best for the careers we have was our innate interests, graduate education, and life experience - for example, it was as a volunteer in the Peace Corps in Morocco that I first realized I had a knack for teaching.

As we agree, there are all different kinds of WS atmospheres. But I want to stress again, that at mine there was no expectation that non-Waldorf kids wouldn't be a social events, etc. Most of the students at my school were from very mainstream families. Not having a tv made my sibs and I real freaks! There's everyone talking at recess about the Fonz (ok, I'm dating myself!) and I'm wondering who the heck this character is...
post #29 of 186
Really really interesting thread!
I am excited to keep reading. My children aren't school age yet, but we were pretty much "set" on Waldorf education for them.. It's nice to get to see the "whole picture"
Thanks to all of you who have posted so far
post #30 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by beansavi
As a trained Waldorf teacher AND Anthroposophist ( to this day I belong to ASA) I have to say I am able to see all of the good sides to Waldorf as well, and my training had caused me to meet "Waldorfians" from all over the U.S. and world. Of course I can see the good Waldorf does every day. This thread was about very real concerns, which are just as relevant and real.
And I agree. Waldorf schools have a lot to offer - if they, some of them, would just stop the silly controlling nonsense that they seem to enjoy practicing. You should never have been put through what you went through. And the entire process had absolutely NOTHING to do with Waldorf education OR Anthroposophy in the pure sense. But, unfortunately, Waldorf education, as an ideal, is not Waldorf education as a reality (in some schools at least) and there are frequently those dogmatic, controlling, selfish people that do such great harm to what would otherwise be a good school system with the potential for greatness.
Quote:
Waldorf has established its own reputation all by itself... both good and bad.

I think what you, Pete, and the others are saying is fair and true, and we all need and deserve a safe place to hash it out and get our heads straight. I think this forum is the perfect place for that... :
I'm happy to hash things out here if the moderators will permit it. I think there is tremendous potential for good here - from what I can tell, this thread has been viewed over 500 times already.
Quote:
Thank you once again so so much for believing my family and myself and for making this a safe, healing place for these discussions, vent sessions (healthy), supportive virtual coffee house chats, etc...... Thank you, too, for sharing the "other side" of the Waldorf story, too, to help us maintain balance respectfully.

Again "Thank you" is not enough....
There is no need to thank me. I should be thanking you for having the courage to come forward. I've been publicly and privately discussing Waldorf for several years now. I have been thanked dozens of times by people who, only after having read my posts, realized they weren't the only ones to experience such things. So many times, people have terrible experiences at the hands of very hurtful people at Waldorf schools and keep it all inside. Best to let it out - and by doing so, you help the next person let it out too.

Pete
post #31 of 186
People can share their experiences, pro and con, as long as there is no naming of specific schools and individuals, as that could put MDC into a potential legal situation. Also that members follow the UA. So thanks to all of you for not doing any of that in this thread.

In many ways to me, as a Waldorf outsider, the problems you all describe sound similar to what some experience in public schools, which again, vary tremendously even from neighborhood to neighborhood. Heirarchical institutions rarely feel the need to explain themselves to anyone and also believe they have the perogative to deal with the situation any way they see fit. And in public school, so many have found themselves fighting the school board over similar issues. In many ways it seems like human nature (the less positive aspects of it), that folks who have 'the power' (in the administration) behave this way.

I wonder, is the disappointment or distress made worse by having the expectation that somehow Waldorf would be different? That the philosophy would help the schools to "rise above" such heirarchical/institutional behavior?
post #32 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by lauren
I wonder, is the disappointment or distress made worse by having the expectation that somehow Waldorf would be different? That the philosophy would help the schools to "rise above" such heirarchical/institutional behavior?

Well yes, there is that expectation. . mainly because inherent in Waldorf Education are values such as 'reverence for all beings' and the concept of thoughtfulness/consciousness shedding light on/being applied to everything.

With that kind of rhetoric (of which there is much, much more along similar lines) you would think they'd be the stewards of that ship and walk their talk, right? Especially because, as a school, as teachers, as a community there are behaviors being modeled, examples being set, etc.

In fact, one of the most telling reflections of this sort of hypocrisy (that exists in my own Waldorf experience) is when the children in the higher grades start catching on to what's really going on. .

Sure, a lot of the parents love to chalk it up to 'adolescent hormones' and such when the children begin rolling their eyes at everything. . . .

When the sixth graders at my school grew into the awareness that 'this is what we say, which is different than what we do,' I watched them begin to blatantly mock the very verse they were speaking every morning in their classroom. They would look at each other knowingly, with tongue-in-cheek.
post #33 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by lauren
In many ways to me, as a Waldorf outsider, the problems you all describe sound similar to what some experience in public schools, which again, vary tremendously even from neighborhood to neighborhood. Heirarchical institutions rarely feel the need to explain themselves to anyone and also believe they have the perogative to deal with the situation any way they see fit. And in public school, so many have found themselves fighting the school board over similar issues. In many ways it seems like human nature (the less positive aspects of it), that folks who have 'the power' (in the administration) behave this way.
Oh, but Lauren, it is waaaay different than public school. In Waldorf, you have a private school that is, at least in some states, not bound by the regulations that public schools are bound by. In one case, as an example, a teacher distributed "calming pills" to boys in her classroom. These were pills supplied by the mother of another child for her child. If it were a public school, and a teacher passed out medication to children it was not intended for, the teacher would lose her job immediately and parents would have recourse - have police investigate, etc. As it turned out, not only could the police do nothing because it was a private school, but the school itself covered up the incident, said the children who testified against their own teacher were lying, and claimed that the pills were gummy-bears (which they were absolutely NOT). The children who testified against their teacher had to go back into class with the same teacher and suffer the punishments (and there were plenty) this teacher had waiting for them.

Public school teachers are not united by a religious philosophy. The religious philosophy of Anthroposophy indicates, and teachers believe, that there is a karmic connection between the teacher and the student. Once that connection has been established, the parents are incidental. Waldorf schools, because of their "higher" calling, feel they are instrumental in the incarnation and the development of, not just the child, but the karma of the child. Again, as an example, things like mandatory reporting laws may be ignored as they are of minor significance in the grand scheme of the spiritual development of the child. When children were molested at one large and well established school in Southern California, and there have been several cases of it - at least two by teachers and at least two by the teenage son of a teacher, the first sacrifice in the best interests of the school has been the children themselves. Mandatory reporting laws have routinely been ignored in these cases and the child's integrity and honesty has routinely been questioned - even put on trial. When a teacher can justify literally any behavior by claiming that it is karmically motivated or necessary, and that their spiritual connection to the child is as strong or stronger than that of the child's own parents, there really isn't any comparison with public school behavior. When an entire society of teachers supports that teacher's behavior, no matter how obtuse, no matter how harmful to the children, there is something seriously wrong and any comparison to a public school system is a great disservice to parents and children who have suffered at the hands of such monsters... er... teachers.
Quote:
I wonder, is the disappointment or distress made worse by having the expectation that somehow Waldorf would be different? That the philosophy would help the schools to "rise above" such heirarchical/institutional behavior?
Every parent who puts their child in any school has very basic expectations - that their child will be reasonably safe, that teachers will not intentionally harm their child, that values the parent holds are roughly in parallel with values the school holds. It isn't as if parents who put their kids in and later pull their kids out of Waldorf are disappointed because the children haven't become independent thinking philosophers or humanitarians. Parents pull their kids out of Waldorf because of serious problems. And really, what do parents have to base their expectations on? Until recently, objective, critical discussions about Waldorf schools were not available to most parents. Only over the past few years, and with the availability of the internet, parents have had access to such discussions. As more and more parents become aware, and I'm sure you have even noticed it here on these boards, parents come in saying "I've heard of Waldorf, and it sounds great, but what's all this weird stuff I keep hearing about?" Here is a good place for them to find out.

By the way, thanks Lauren, for allowing these discussions.

Pete
post #34 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by May May
Well yes, there is that expectation. . mainly because inherent in Waldorf Education are values such as 'reverence for all beings' and the concept of thoughtfulness/consciousness shedding light on/being applied to everything.

With that kind of rhetoric (of which there is much, much more along similar lines) you would think they'd be the stewards of that ship and walk their talk, right? Especially because, as a school, as teachers, as a community there are behaviors being modeled, examples being set, etc.
That, as a parent, is my biggest fear - that my kids will model their behavior on the behavior of their teachers. I don't care about the academic pitfalls nearly as much as I care about the social distortion that occurs at Waldorf schools. In my experience, it is huge.
Quote:
In fact, one of the most telling reflections of this sort of hypocrisy (that exists in my own Waldorf experience) is when the children in the higher grades start catching on to what's really going on. .

Sure, a lot of the parents love to chalk it up to 'adolescent hormones' and such when the children begin rolling their eyes at everything. . . .

When the sixth graders at my school grew into the awareness that 'this is what we say, which is different than what we do,' I watched them begin to blatantly mock the very verse they were speaking every morning in their classroom. They would look at each other knowingly, with tongue-in-cheek.
In high school, the results of this "knowing" of the hypocrisy, and knowing they are not learning anything challenging or relevant in the modern world (Goethean science and Mendellian genetics for example) is, in my experience, lots and lots of kids turning to drugs, or video games, or sex. In one class (and Lauren, I hate having to phrase everything in this way because it sounds like the experience is hearsay rather than direct), a letter went home to parents stating that a very great percentage of tenth grade kids - something like 75% or more - were using marijuanna. The suggestions, among other things, was to tuck your child into bed each night. Yeah, right. A school sooooo out of touch with the modern world is hardly the place where healthy children may develop - IMO. Kids who are so completely bored out of their minds literally, are going to find other things to keep their minds occupied. Children who have any backbone left at all will rebel as they get older. And it is certain to be more than just rolling their eyes at morning prayer... er... verse.

Pete
post #35 of 186
To everyone:

You all are great, and Pete, you are so right: each person that speaks out makes it so much better for the rest to come forward or nip things in the bud... We have also done a great job about not naming names... we don't have to to feel validated, because I truly believe the karma of their behavior is like a stone they add to their "backpack" in life. So, they have to carry that weight, not me.

I worked in public schools three years after leaving the WS, and what I see as the difference is that those who make the controversial decisions at least had to go to college and earn a degree before they made sweeping decisions that effect someone's professional or eductional careers! Some at the WS who made the decisions about my punishment didn't have any degrees. In public schools there is also the National Education Association who has your back legally and ethically.

Also, thanks for understanding about the "hazy feelings after talking about Waldorf dysfunction" issue, and your point is so true, I have had self doubt for so long despite many people and two counselors telling my family we are lucky to be out of the school! Despite that!

You guys rock!

You all inspire me so much and have helped my heart to heal, which has eluded me for so long...

B
post #36 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by beansavi
To everyone:

You all are great, and Pete, you are so right: each person that speaks out makes it so much better for the rest to come forward or nip things in the bud... We have also done a great job about not naming names... we don't have to to feel validated, because I truly believe the karma of their behavior is like a stone they add to their "backpack" in life. So, they have to carry that weight, not me.
Amen! :
Quote:
I worked in public schools three years after leaving the WS, and what I see as the difference is that those who make the controversial decisions at least had to go to college and earn a degree before they made sweeping decisions that effect someone's professional or eductional careers! Some at the WS who made the decisions about my punishment didn't have any degrees. In public schools there is also the National Education Association who has your back legally and ethically.
And that is one of my biggest problems with Waldorf - accountability. There literally is NONE.
Quote:
Also, thanks for understanding about the "hazy feelings after talking about Waldorf dysfunction" issue, and your point is so true, I have had self doubt for so long despite many people and two counselors telling my family we are lucky to be out of the school! Despite that!
I've been talking on-line for years with another former Waldorf teacher who went through the same types of things. He ended up in the hospital over stress-related problems due to his Waldorf experience. Believe me - talking is good, and it's cleansing.
Quote:
You guys rock!

You all inspire me so much and have helped my heart to heal, which has eluded me for so long...


So, let me ask you...Beansavi, one topic that I would like to discuss here is the Waldorf curriculum - something you say you believe in. I have my doubts about the integrity of Waldorf curriculum and maybe that's worthy of a bit of discussion - if you feel up to it. I'll start a fresh thread for that one when I get a few minutes. Interested?

Pete
post #37 of 186
beansavi



~
I'd like to bring up a new but related subject to this discussion:

It's the concept of peer-orientation, developed by Dr. Gordon Neufeld (from his book: Hold On To Your Kids. Also, info. at: www.gordonneufeld.com). His ideas are similar to David Elkind's (The Hurried Child), but taken a bit further.


(I actually learned about peer-orientation from one of the many lovely mothers here on MDC! )



~
The basic principle (which I am still studying and learning about, myself) is this (which is very congruent with Anthroposophy, I might add):

Children start out being 100% parent-oriented, as infants. As they grow, they are gradually pulling away from the parents toward independence, which is defined (by Dr. Neufeld) as 'self-orientation.' At no point during this metamorphosis is it healthy or necessary for the child to go through a stage of peer-orientation.

However, many children do.

In fact, so many children experience peer-orientation (especially during adolescence) that it appears to be a 'normal' part of the childhood developmental process. But, in fact, it is only 'normal' because it is common, not because it is good or necessary.

An example of this issue would be in my previous post where I described the behaviors of the sixth-grade Waldorf students (that I know personally) in response to the hypocrisy surrounding them at the Waldorf school, as well as the scenario you described, Pete, in the high school-aged children you mentioned as smoking marijuana.

The children in these situations, as they grow older and more independent, are placing the compass of their behavior-modification in the hands of their peers, as opposed to the adults in their lives or themselves.

This theory also provides understanding for the choices older children make that lead to the dangers inherent in peer pressure to conform to wrong or risky behavior.

There is obviously much more to this topic than what I've mentioned. But I wanted to bring it up for a highly relevant reason:



Children who are not attached enough to their parents (as older children) via verbal and physical communication, such as touch, and other bonding activities are more likely to become peer-oriented as they approach adolescence.

What I've noticed is that Waldorf is not very focused on attachment-style relationships. There is no significant level of encouragement for a child's emotional development and/or self-expression, especially when that expression involves negative emotions.

Also, there is not an open dialogue or conflict-resolution 'standard' being modeled amongst the adults, generally speaking.


Waldorf, in my experience, does not seem to especially value or advocate on behalf of the very human needs for communication and self-expression.

I can see how then, from a distance, the logical effects, manifesting inherently, as a result of the cause. It is a predictable procession of unfoldment, under these circumstances, and also represents reasoning in support of Steiner's feeling that Anthroposophy needed to evolve and be applied relevant to the current human experience.
post #38 of 186
Well may May and Pete, you both certainly opened quite interesting and in-depth issues here which I would love to discuss with you! (Maybe we should start a new thread for that...)

Before we do, I will just say briefly that, May May, whay you were speaking about in your last post certainly sounds logical and rings true to me (which I put a lot of stock in, by the way). In my Waldorf training there was no mention of conflict resolution between children, but I am not quite finished, and hopefully it will be addressed. The teacher having a sing-songy voice or expecting the other children to behave that way (or else they won't fit in) is not enough in that department. Let me quickly qualify that by saying I am guessing some Waldorf schools have dealt with that whole issue quite nicely.

Pete, I am devoted to the Waldorf curriculum. The recognition of the human spirit as well as brain, the respect for the unfolding of the incarnating child... I do not, however, feel that it is all inclusive, or addresses everything that could arise in a school or individual child, etc. The curriculum was developed a hundred years ago and I think Steiner was cool enough that he would have tweaked it along the way. He did not speak in a sing-songy voice, he was a jokester, and a very spiritual man, too. Did you know his best friend, who he said he had spent numerous lifetimes with, and who was his nursemaid on his deathbed was kicked out of the Anthroposophical Society after he died because she disagreed with a few key people? That doesn't sound very productive to me...

What I believe in is that the areas in modern life that are not addressed in curriculum must rely on the integrity of the teacher -- and that s/he must have a maturity and level of character to deal with any bumps along the way.

To admit as a teacher you don't have an answer, or that you screwed up, or that you are having a rotten day so need to postpone a major decision requires bravery and humility. Humility requires bravery, or the ability to put aside your ego and your image as "god/dess in training" and do the right thing. Ironically, if we can manage to do this, then we get closer to that enlightened place, anyway.

This is what Steiner wanted to happen. He viewed Waldorf education as a homeopathic remedy for society. It is intended as the great "rock tumbler", bumping people against each other until their sharp edges are gone, until they are smooth and shiny. But I do not see this happening. The humility is not there in my view/experience. And that makes me sad, because it has such potential. I feel righteous anger at the dysfunction.... (do I need anger management? Just kidding, bad joke).

Sincerely,
B
post #39 of 186
Thank you all very much for expressing exactly what our family experienced as well. We stayed briefly, and left when we started to experience the same dishonesty, evasiveness, judgement when we questioned *anything*, and fear for our child's safety that you have all expressed. It was just too much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by May May
What I've noticed is that Waldorf is not very focused on attachment-style relationships. There is no significant level of encouragement for a child's emotional development and/or self-expression, especially when that expression involves negative emotions.

Also, there is not an open dialogue or conflict-resolution 'standard' being modeled amongst the adults, generally speaking.

Waldorf, in my experience, does not seem to especially value or advocate on behalf of the very human needs for communication and self-expression.
This was also our (very surprising) realization. You put it very well; thank you. It was a big disappointment; I wish I had known up front. There were really very few tools for working with negative emotions besides putting a child in the hall for the day; not the most effective way to handle conflict.
post #40 of 186
wow I just saw this thread and am surprised to see that I'm not the only one who felt that things were a bit strange at a waldorf school. We had our son in a waldorf school that is kind of newish in our area for about a month or so before we decided to pull him out.

Quote:
a general feeling of secrecy and evasiveness. When combined with the singsong gentle sweetness of a waldorf teacher, it's kind of creepy.
My impression exactly! I'd rather either homeschool him in waldorf style like with www.oakmeadow.com or just put him in a public school man!
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