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Wanting to be induced early - Page 3

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by MilkOnDemand
See, I am fairly certain I'll need a c-section unless baby turns soon (and yes I'm working hard on that with no luck), however, I won't plan it. Unless we have some sort of distress, I'll go into labor naturally and if I show up at the hospital with a breech lie, then they can proceed (no hospital here will deliver a breech anymore), but I surely won't schedule one for a big baby or convience.
Tara,
Has your doctor tried an external version yet? I would definitely go that route first before submitting to a c-section, even though it is more "invasive" than the more anecdotal breech turning techniques. My friend has had a baby who really enjoys being breech this pgcy and has had 4 versions, 2 of them successful- she is going for a VBAC (1st CS for breech) and so regrets that she didn't attempt version the 1st pgcy. Currently her babe is head down after being turned last week.
take care
post #42 of 47
Sometimes what worries me is whether or not doctors are just ignorant or lying to their patients about the risks.

Supposedly it's mandatory by law to practise "informed consent", which as Henci Goer points out in her book basically translates to "enough information so that you will consent to the procedure", and I find most of the pregnant women on the mainstream boards have NO IDEA about the real risks of various procedures, and I'm not even talking about anything remotely as scary as worst case scenario risks.

I'd bet money that if a lot of women knew the real risks, they might actually think twice. And I think it's shameful that doctors will conceal or omit the risks of "routine" procedures. (I also think it's shameful that the FDA allows off-label use of drugs, such as Cytotec, for that matter).

Generally I also get the impression that many doctors are not interested in empowering their patients to handle childbirth, and approach it as a condition that needs a cure or help, rather than a natural process that by and large requires little direct intervention.

And I hate the crappy reasons and methods that many doctors use to essentially coerce their patients into agreeing with certain procedures, outside of the omission of information. My upstairs neighbour (and daughter of our landlord) was due with her boy about 3 weeks or so before me (I'm due July 11), she was already scheduled for an induction June 15th, for no apparant reason that I remember. Then when I spoke to her 2 weeks ago, she said that that Wednesday they were going to decide whether to induce her even earlier because she already had such a HUGE baby, as he was already 7lbs.

She had her induction and baby last week. And a good 2 weeks or so after she was told that she had a baby that was already 7lbs and destined to be huge, she gave birth to a 6lb15oz baby. So much for "huge", and so much for the accuracy of late term ultrasound weight predictions.

Granted, she seemed perfectly happy about the fully medicalised hospital birth. She already has a son, and this is my first baby... so there's no way that she was going to listen to anything I was going to say on the subject, had I felt any inclination to broach it, which I didn't. I'm just one half of the weird goth couple that lives downstairs and who's having an unmedicated home water birth (hopefully), and who's going to breastfeed and clothdiaper, neither of which she's even going to attempt. So I seriously doubt she'd take tips from the "weirdo" first-timer.

I've made a point of posting in depth about my pregnancy and birth choices on my blog and livejournal, for my own personal reasons, as well as to inform anyone who's interested in reading. I don't know how many times people have responded with "wow, I didn't know that/that you could do that". If I can make just one person stop and think and research instead of just doing the standard thing without asking questions, then I feel I've succeeded.



Marieke
post #43 of 47
Thread Starter 
Someone I know on a breastfeeding website where I post is just going through one of those situations that gets me worried.

She is having her first baby. Has had some BP issues in the past so is being heavily monitored by her OB. Her BP is now stable. She is currently at 38 weeks, has just been told that her baby is 'big' at 7 lbs and her OB wants to induce her at 39 weeks. She's not comfortable with the idea - she has no signs of labour happening soon and fears her body will not be ready for induction and she will end up with a c-section - but says she doesn't know what to do.

This is EXACTLY the sort of situation that women fall for. No good medical reasons for induction but hey, the doctor says he recommends it, and so....

If it were me personally I would say 'NO', but when it is your first baby, and there is so much pressure on you, and the doctor uses words like 'let's play it safe'.....
post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by NordicMamma
She is currently at 38 weeks, has just been told that her baby is 'big' at 7 lbs and her OB wants to induce her at 39 weeks. She's not comfortable with the idea - she has no signs of labour happening soon and fears her body will not be ready for induction and she will end up with a c-section - but says she doesn't know what to do.

This is EXACTLY the sort of situation that women fall for. No good medical reasons for induction but hey, the doctor says he recommends it, and so....

If it were me personally I would say 'NO', but when it is your first baby, and there is so much pressure on you, and the doctor uses words like 'let's play it safe'.....

Yeah, and WTH is it with that "7lbs is BIG!" stuff? I've heard of tiny people birthing legitimately large (10+lb) babies... including our birth educator's mother, who was 4'11 or so and who had a 10 or 11 lb baby at home, without tearing.

This is my first pregnancy too, and I think I'd be giving my OB the two-fingered salute with such crappy reasons to do interventions on me for no good reason. But then I like to consider myself more educated than most on it. Which, for starters, is why I chose a midwife instead, and why I'm staying at home (and while I live in the US I'm from Holland, where, as you know, homebirth and low intervention birth is common).

Thankfully my midwife doesn't put much stock in weight predictions, and she also doesn't start considering people late until 42 weeks, and doesn't use the EDD as the be-all-end-all date by which everything must come out ASAP.


Marieke
post #45 of 47
Thread Starter 
Hey Marieke,

I am also from Holland originally. If I lived there now, I would definitely be trying for a home birth. (I myself was born at home, in my parents' bed, attended only by the local GP.) For me, with a low risk pregnancy, it seems the safest and best place to be.

Unfortunately homebirth in Sweden is very difficult to organise, and a costly affair, so I will be in hospital here. But I am aiming for as little intervention as possible, and an early trip home. I may have to be bitchy about it, but so be it.

Recently we had a little survey on the mainstream site asking what our greatest fears about labour were. Most people replied 'pain'. Mine was 'unnecessary intervention'. I fear what people will do to me far more than how my body will make me feel.
post #46 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by NordicMamma
Unfortunately homebirth in Sweden is very difficult to organise, and a costly affair, so I will be in hospital here. But I am aiming for as little intervention as possible, and an early trip home. I may have to be bitchy about it, but so be it.
Yeah, even in the US it can be hard to organise. I remember my mother saying it was hard to organise when she had my youngest brother (23 years ago) in Britain, I never dreamed that some 2+ decades later I'd also have problems trying to organise a homebirth... and we live about 25-30 miles outside of New York City! I can't imagine what it would be like somewhere more rural.

We had to do a lot of fighting with our insurance company, because while technically that's covered under the policy, most of the homebirth midwives in our area were not on the insurance company's provider list, and having to pay 30% out of pocket is pretty stiff. What's worse was that one midwife we chose was listed on the company's provider list, but that was old information, so we didn't find out until later that she wasn't actually covered. And the only other covered midwife used to be 30 miles away, but they also had old info for her, and she now lives 55+ miles away (and who knows whether the site info was also outdated in regards to plan coverage). Eventually they caved and paid the first midwife as in-network, but that was 2 months of calls back and forth.

Quote:
Recently we had a little survey on the mainstream site asking what our greatest fears about labour were. Most people replied 'pain'. Mine was 'unnecessary intervention'. I fear what people will do to me far more than how my body will make me feel.
And this is exactly the reason I wanted a homebirth.

I get the feeling though that the hospital birth experience in Holland, and the one here in the US is a lot different too. The statistics on c-section/intervention and the general attitude towards painkillers and medications (both over the counter and prescription) is very different and stacked towards the high end here.

As for pain being the biggest fear, I think that people are also often woefully unaware of the real risks that most interventions carry (and doctors certainly like to keep it that way). On mainstream boards people talk about c-sections as though you were just going to get a haircut... the mind boggles. If people really knew what risks there were, and were empowered more to trust their bodies, as well as have better emotional support, then the situation would be a lot different.




Marieke
post #47 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marieke
I get the feeling though that the hospital birth experience in Holland, and the one here in the US is a lot different too. The statistics on c-section/intervention and the general attitude towards painkillers and medications (both over the counter and prescription) is very different and stacked towards the high end here.
I think giving birth in a Dutch hospital is probably not all that different from Sweden. Here they rely on midwife care, unless there is an actual medical problem. The general attitude is to have as little intervention as possible. My local hospital (a teaching hospital that takes high risk cases from all over the area) has a c-section rate of 13% and an epidural rate of 15%. I think that says a lot. VBACs are the norm rather than the exception. Inductions for going 'overdue' are not generally offered until at least 42 weeks. I know several women who gave brith vaginally to breech babies, and no one made a big fuss about it.

One thing that I am sure makes a difference is that in Sweden they have so many other pain relief options to offer women before going for an epidural ('gas & air', accupunture, massage, TNS machine) - epidurals are seen as the last resort in pain relief, rather than something everybody 'must have' if they don't want to be seen as a martyr.

Anyway, I am quite happy to have a hospital birth in Sweden. I would still prefer a homebirth, but given the circumstances, I feel comfortable with what I've got.
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