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Need links please... karo syrup and botchalisim in infants

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Greetings,
I remember reading something months ago about not giving karo syrup to infants due to the chance it could cause botchalisim in infants, like honey.
I can not seem to find anything right now... can anyone please help me

TIA
post #2 of 9
Really? I'm dubious about that, because Karo is *so* highly processed. I'd say, you shouldn't give it to anyone, and especially not babies, because it contains HFCS. But, I highly doubt the botulism argument...
post #3 of 9
I have not heard anything about the connection between the two, but a couple of thoughts...
I think it may be spelled botulism, which will help you do more effective searches.

Why give an infant corn syrup in the first place? Aren't there better alternatives?
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by melissa17s
.Why give an infant corn syrup in the first place? Aren't there better alternatives?
:LOL Yeah, you would think a doctor would know this!

Oh wait... my bad...
population control

propaganda!
post #5 of 9
A pop nutritionist on the web mentions this but doesn't cite a source:

http://www.storknet.com/experts/nutrition/jf1.htm

Apparently it was common for docs to prescribe corn syrup in the past for constipation, and the research is "recent". Here is a link to a pediatricina's email list:

http://listserv.brown.edu/archives/c...l&F=&S=&P=6327

I am quoting the article that the first doc in the list cited:

Quote:
Am J Dis Child 1990 Jan;144(1):60

Risk factors for infant botulism in the United States.

Spika JS, Shaffer N, Hargrett-Bean N, Collin S, MacDonald KL, Blake PA

Division of Bacterial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga 30333.

To define risk factors for infant botulism, we performed a 2-year prospective case-control study of 68 laboratory-confirmed cases in infants living in the United States, outside of California. For each case patient, two control subjects were matched by date and hospital of birth or county birth records. By univariate analysis, breast-feeding (odds ratio = 2.9) and consumption of honey (odds ratio = 9.8) were associated with disease, but only 11 case patients (16%) had eaten honey. Decreased frequency of bowel movement (less than one per day for at least 2 months) was also associated with disease in infants 2 months of age and older (odds ratio = 5.2). Risk factors changed with the age of the patient at disease onset when analyzed by multivariate logistic regression methods. For infants less than 2 months old, living in a rural area or on a farm was the only significant risk factor (odds ratio = 6.4). For infants 2 months of age and older, breast-feeding (odds ratio = 3.8), less than one bowel movement per day for at least 2 months (odds ratio = 2.9), and ingestion of corn syrup (odds ratio = 5.2) were associated with disease. The severity of the disease was similar for breast- and bottle-fed infants. Clearly defined food exposures account for a minority of infant botulism cases. Preexisting host factors, such as intestinal flora and frequency of bowel movements, may be the most important risk factors for development of disease.
So that's 1990. It looks from the Google links like the research has gone back and forth, but it's not something that pediatricians should be recommending anymore.
post #6 of 9
Oh my .... I'm afraid to ask why you need to know.... aarggg. I've always heard the same thing. I think one concern is that it can grow once it's open....

good luck

-Angela
post #7 of 9
I remember reading this on the karo web site when trying to find info a few years back if it was ok to give...

This is what is posted on their web site.



Should Karo syrup be used for infant feeding?

We are aware that some health care professionals suggest feeding Karo syrup to infants in a formula or for relief of constipation. Because corn syrup, like many other foods is not a sterile product, there is a remote possibility that it may contain C. botulinum spores.

These spores are common in the environment and generally not harmful to older children and adults. In fact, in the FDA study conducted in 1991, corn syrup and other syrups are not identified as food sources of C. botulinum spores for infants.

However, because Karo is not specifically intended for infant feeding, we suggest you consult your pediatrician for advice.
post #8 of 9
Isn't it interesting that only 11 of the 68 cases studied were given honey? And it doesn't say that the honey was cultured and confirmed as the botulism source, just that they had eaten it.

In fact, this is the most interesting part of the abstract to me:
Quote:
Clearly defined food exposures account for a minority of infant botulism cases. Preexisting host factors, such as intestinal flora and frequency of bowel movements, may be the most important risk factors for development of disease.
I wonder why breastfeeding is an associated risk factor?
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna
Oh my .... I'm afraid to ask why you need to know.... aarggg. Angela
Looking for info I can print out and present to people.. IE; the case worker, the foster person, ect....

Here is a quote from my documentation at visitation on Friday when I learned of my 6mo old DD being FORCED karo syrup....

Quote:
Something was said about *A* having green poop and diaper rash while *L* was standing there. *L* replied the poop was probably from the “karo syrup” in which *L* had been giving her. *C* and *C* immediately looked at one another in total shock. As *L* said this *C* stated to *L*, “You have given my baby karo syrup? You do not give babies karo syrup, Karo Syrup can cause botulism in babies, just as honey.” *L* replied with “thats what the doctor siad to give her for constipation.” *C*replied to this by saying “ Well that doctor is not very well informed, and had you done any research before just putting anything into a babies body, you would learned also that karo syrup can cause botulism. I do not want
*A* having any karo syrup at any time, I do not care if the doctor said to give it to her or not. *A* is not to be given karo Syrp.” *L* walked away.
*A* is my 6 mo old DD
*L* is the foster care giver whom has had DD for the past 2 1/2 months
*C* and *C* are myself and DH

If you can not tell by my words, I am pretty damn fet up with these peopel. This was the same visitation in which I learned of my 3 yr old DD being vaccinated for the first time EVER that day, and also of my 8 yr old DS walking into the room with a damn broken freaking nose with two black eyes that were swollen horribly!
I was not in a good mood to begin with to say the least!!!
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