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"This is why I homeschool" - Page 8

post #141 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by didelphus
I'd hope that most of the folks who made the "that's why I homeschool" comments might have some kids in school, also? Otherwise why in the heck would they be on the "Learning at School" board? Surely not just to flame, right?
I don't think that saying "that's why I homeschool" equals a flame.

I certainly can understand how many posters with children in public school can feel those comments are unnecessary and unhelpful. But, I don't think the intent was to flame or cause strife.

The way that I personally interpreted the comment was "I also encountered those issues or issues like those, and they bothered me so much I decided not to participate in the public school system and am homeschooling".

I can understand why that might not be the support or info someone's looking for, but I don't think it is really that bad of a comment to make (I don't think the intentions are bad). That's JMHO tho.
post #142 of 148
I agree with Kristimetz. I wouldn't have taken it as a flame, just as an alternative solution. The problems with public schools IS why I now homeschool one of my children. I think a couple of years ago, I saw a similar thread with a "that's why I homeschool" type theme. It actually put the idea of homeschooling in my head and I started doing research on it. After many, many months, and much research, I decided it would be the perfect thing for dd. And it has been.

I also agree that homeschooling is not a privelege or a luxury. It's just another choice. And with choice comes sacrifice. You can argue the meaning of the words all you want, but it will always lead to a full circle. There are ups and downs to all methods of schooling. Not everyone in this world can homeschool and not everyone in this world can send their children to school. Although, in America, it is easier to pick which one you prefer regardless of your situation. If you really really want something, there is always a way.
post #143 of 148
Wow. You all really don't "get it".
Show me where homeschooling resources are offered to every parent.
You see ads everywhere for public and private school, but no where is homeschooling even given as a viable choice.
Homeschooling communities are very tight lipped and not very helpful. The self-righteous attitude is what disuades me from even asking anything on these boards.
As for the Native American links that were given by a pp, they are all based on christian and/or American standards of education.

The whole idea of "well, you have choices and you are just not doing enough to make the right choices." is the same as the whole idea of "rising up out of poverty".

Homeschoolers will always have a certain privelage above and beyond the average American citizen.

No one was labeling anyone a rich suburban wife, or talking about other countries. I am talking about the United States of America. Yes, even in the United States of America, food is a privelage. There are millions of people starving in the U.S. right now.

Food, water, and shelter are not a "right" for every person in America.
post #144 of 148
MamaintheBoonies, I'm really about your posts. I really don't get it, obviously. You seem to feel that being Native American has a big impact on your ability to homeschool or not, yet you have not explained why that is short of listing things that you claim you can't teach your kids. I really don't understand. I'm not NA, I have never been to a resrevation, I must be missing something. Please, explain it to me more concretely.

Namaste!
post #145 of 148
This is a really interesting thread, and bear with me because I haven't had a chance to read all of the replies.

MamaintheBoonies, I understand what you're saying.

Privilege is really a relative matter. In my family's situation, we are able to make it work so that one parent (my husband) can stay home with my daughter instead of placing her in daycare. If someone told me that I was privileged to be able to do that, well, I'd say Yes, I am. I wouldn't get all bent out of shape about it. I also don't think commenting on privilege is necessarily to negate the (relative) sacrifices we make to be able to do this.
post #146 of 148
<<<Show me where homeschooling resources are offered to every parent.
You see ads everywhere for public and private school, but no where is homeschooling even given as a viable choice.>>>>

Homeschooling resources aren't "offered" because it's still not a totally mainstream, fully accepted way to school your child - although legal in all states. I just happened upon it by chance and through word of mouth. And what kind of resources do you mean? Everything is available to anyone who seeks it.

<<<<Homeschooling communities are very tight lipped and not very helpful. The self-righteous attitude is what disuades me from even asking anything on these boards.>>>>

You have got to be kidding. H/s parents are far from tight-lipped - to those who are sincerely curious about this option. All the h/s parents I know have chosen this option for their children because they think it's best. Being proud of your choices and suggesting it as an option to someone else doesn't make one self-righteous. On a homeschooling board, you are going to find people who love homeschooling and will help others in any way possible to get them started.

<<<<As for the Native American links that were given by a pp, they are all based on christian and/or American standards of education.>>>>

At least someone was truly trying to help you out. Obviously no one here has suggestions for what you actually want. You know, you can research and create your own curriculum for your child. If your state requires tests and paperwork (as mine does) then you can also find a way to fit in basic studies as well.

<<<<The whole idea of "well, you have choices and you are just not doing enough to make the right choices." is the same as the whole idea of "rising up out of poverty".>>>>

You seem to take everything personally and are really defensive. I understand you want what you want and feel you can't have it. We all feel that way about things. DO something about it then. Be the lone voice. Make a stand.

And can you please tell me what is your idea of the privelege with homeschooling? Just elaborate and be specific. Is it the money? The spouse? The area? What? I gave up a lot to homeschool. I sacrificed my own needs to foster my child's. It wasn't easy. I can't afford much of what I'd like. My state (NY) is one of the toughest states to homeschool in. We don't follow someone else's idea of curriculum. I created my own - through unschooling - based on my child's interests. My family aren't all supportive. My neighborhood is not homeschool- friendly. I worry every about dd's well-being. I am looked down upon by many. WHAT PRIVILEGE? But I know this is best for dd and that's what I focus on. I have 2 other kids in public school. I see all sides of this. The bottom line is that if you really want to homeschool, you can - despite what you think is holding you back. No one is saying that homeschooling is the best thing in the world - only the best for THEM. There are so many homeschooling support groups because most of us need help, support, and advice. There are probably many just like you who have made it work. And if you want to liken it to "rising up out of poverty" then go ahead. I did it. It was hard and after graduating college with $26,000 in loans I got a job, got married and took 10 years to pay it off. In the 70s we were on welfare, food stamps, church clothes, and lived with grandparents. I guess that's why I don't understand the "woe is me" attitude. Can you tell me again, what do these "privileged" people have that you don't?
post #147 of 148
I want to reiterate, I'm jumping in the discussion because it originally started out in the learning at school forum. So PLEASE keep this mind! I don't mind debate, I'm trying to be respectful and polite, and it's just a really interesting topic.

There were some questions that people posed to me pages ago, and I thought I might answer 'em.

Someone wanted to know how the concept of public schooling was democratic. It's a Jeffersonian ideal. Thomas Jefferson was a big champion of public schools, as a means to give everyone* (see asterik below) without the econonic means otherwise, a chance at an education. Those with the means were already able to educate their kids. With education comes liberty. Here's a quote that I like: Worth and genius would thus have been sought out from every condition of life, and completely prepared by education for defeating the competition of wealth and birth for public trusts." --Thomas Jefferson to John Adams, 1813. ME 13:399.

I think it's still a worthy goal within the public sector to be able to provide education to all. No matter how many of us here end up choosing something different for our kids, I think there will still always be kids who will need public school. For that reason, I feel it's important for us (being my family, anyway) to be part of that process. For those of you who aren't going to school and are still active in that process, I wholeheartedly commend you. I know that for me, realistically, I can't see being that involved with the system unless we're actually working in it. I'd also imagine everyone here is hoping to raise their children to be well-adjusted, happy-healthy members of society, regardless of what means we choose to get there. I just feel a certain responsiblity to try and build on something, to give something back, for the common good above and beyond that. As I said previously, though, L's well-being is my central concern - so I wouldn't keep doing something that I felt was not beneficial for her.

As for the whole "socialization" debate, you certainly won't get that argument from me that kids should go to school so that they can go through bullying, peer pressure, etc. I am hoping that with all of the attention placed on bullying, at least, that schools will be more pro-active in this regard. I want L to always feel like she can come to me and talk to me, without fear of me downplaying or belittling her concerns. I do think that, overall, school is just a microcosm of our society and our society's values. If you're raising your kid to be mean, or to value consumerism and conformity, or to denigrate intellect, well, that will show up at school, and it'll show up outside of school.

*That wouldn't have originally included African Americans or Native Americans. One of the many contradictions and hypocrisies of one of our "founding fathers."
post #148 of 148
Shannon, thank you for taking the time to respond to my post. I appreciate your opinions and perspective. I do agree that the semnatics of the word privilege seems a little skewed. The english language can be so ambiguous at times.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShannonCC



But these aren't privileges. Not if you go by the dictionary definition of the word. Privileges are things that are given to you *because* you are in a special group of some sort.

Take the partner for example. Like Dar said, there are privileges that come with being a married woman (that is the special group). However, my husband himself is not a privilege. He was not given to me and he cannot be taken away (unless you count death or if one of US decides to split - but it's not as if anyone can revoke him). Being married to him does afford me some privileges (like being on his insurance plan for example) but he himself is not a privilege.
But you are in a privileged position to be able to marry in the first place (see gay marriage rights.) . You are privileged in that you are socialized in a way that you can form a relationship with somebody who supports your major life decisions.

Quote:
Having computer access is another. This is, IMO, a luxury, but it's not a privilege. If I were in some special group and was given a computer just for being a member, that would be a privilege.
Well some may see it that that is the case. You are in a special group that 1) can afford a computer 2) is literate and can learn to use a computer 3) lives in a place where computers are available.





Quote:
Unfortunately, we can't guarantee that. Homeschoolers are individuals and as such we have different opinions on what is kind and helpful and what is rude and inappropriate. However, *this* homeschooler won't do that, ok?
Gotcha, thank you.
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