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A Critical Review of Waldorf Resources - Page 2

post #21 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serena Blaue
There is no effort to hide this information. Just google "anthroposophy" and see.
Unfortunately, incoming parents don't know they need to google "anthroposophy". They are not told about anthroposopy, and if they are, it's in the vaguest terms. They don't know it is the basis, the foundation for everything that happens in the school, and they certainly don't know that it influences even the curriculum. They need to *know* that they are supposed to google "anthroposophy" and they need to *know* why they need to google "anthroposophy". And, as we saw with our first posted school website above, schools generally don't connect anthroposophy with Waldorf very realistically.

Pete
post #22 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete
Unfortunately, incoming parents don't know they need to google "anthroposophy". They are not told about anthroposopy, and if they are, it's in the vaguest terms. They don't know it is the basis, the foundation for everything that happens in the school, and they certainly don't know that it influences even the curriculum. They need to *know* that they are supposed to google "anthroposophy" and they need to *know* why they need to google "anthroposophy". And, as we saw with our first posted school website above, schools generally don't connect anthroposophy with Waldorf very realistically.

Pete

Dear Pete,

I gave 13 examples of how parents can get to know about
anthroposophy at the school near me and you fixate on
googling?! Gee whizzies, why?

If you go to the links http://www.imhoffwaldorf.org/links.asp
you will find an extensive list of resources, incluing anthroposophical
and Waldorf resources. I hope this relieves your concerns!

Serena
post #23 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serena Blaue
Dear Pete,

I gave 13 examples of how parents can get to know about
anthroposophy at the school near me and you fixate on
googling?! Gee whizzies, why?

If you go to the links http://www.imhoffwaldorf.org/links.asp
you will find an extensive list of resources, incluing anthroposophical
and Waldorf resources. I hope this relieves your concerns!

Serena
What I mentioned about googling applies to every one of the 13 resources you gave. Parents need to know about Anthroposophy or have heard about Anthroposophy to ASK about Anthroposophy. Typically, parent orientation evenings and such are not forthcoming about the role of Anthroposophy any more than websites are. And no, your belief that this list is adequate only gives me more reason to be concerned.

Pete
post #24 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serena Blaue
Here's what's available at my local Waldorf School and I suspect that many if not all of these resources are available at most Waldorf Schools:

1. Open House days or evenings where WE is discussed & questions can be answered.
2. Parent/teacher meetings alone or in groups as parents of a class
3. School brochure or website with links to information about Anthroposophy
4. Parent study groups on various WE/A related subjects
5. Foundation year program studying anthroposophy
6. Parent e-mail list with opportunities to ask questions, find resources
7. School library and bookstore with WE and A. related books available
8. School newsletter where local A. Branch calendar & activities are listed
9. Conferences on WE/A by well-known WE teachers, A speakers, etc.
10. Plays, festivals, fundraising events open to the public where materials books, etc. are available about WE/A.
11. Waldorf or A related subscription lists or boards (See Deborah's resources again)
12. Local A branch library or the larger A lending library.
13. Many bookstores now carry Steiner books. Amazon (and other services) has many used A - related books.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete
Unfortunately, incoming parents don't know they need to google “anthroposophy”. They are not told about anthroposophy, and if they are, it's in the vaguest terms.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serena Blaue
I gave 13 examples of how parents can get to know about anthroposophy at the school near me and you fixate on googling?!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete
What I mentioned about googling applies to every one of the 13 resources you gave. Parents need to know about Anthroposophy or have heard about Anthroposophy to ASK about Anthroposophy.
Serena Blaue’s list of 13 resources go well beyond simply ‘googling’. She addressed your concerns and identified the many ways her school approaches this question, including being proactive in introducing parents to Anthroposophy. I read this exchange and wonder if this discussion is for argument’s sake only.

I will say her list is atypical. Most schools certainly don’t hold parent study groups in Anthroposophy. Waldorf education, yes. And in general, most of the reading material made available to parents is, again, Waldorf-specific and often written by teachers or parents. And it’s generally geared toward a light and happy family presentation of Waldorf, and minus all the deep and heavy Anthroposophical ponderings. And again in general, open houses and, in particular, parent meetings are not gatherings where dialogues on Anthroposophy ever take place. These get-togethers are geared specifically to Waldorf-related activities.

No, what’s not listed and is missing, is something along the lines of an ASWNA-produced Anthroposophical handbook, one which all Waldorf Member schools would be responsible for distributing and sharing with prospective parents. Among other things, it would identify: Steiner as a clairvoyant spiritual scientist; the esoteric Christian component; exactly how Steiner’s Anthroposophy finds its way into a Waldorf school’s curriculum, festival life, and community development workings.
post #25 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alanoe
Serena Blaue’s list of 13 resources go well beyond simply ‘googling’. She addressed your concerns and identified the many ways her school approaches this question, including being proactive in introducing parents to Anthroposophy. I read this exchange and wonder if this discussion is for argument’s sake only.
OK, I'll address them one by one. Sometimes I'm just pressed for time.

"1. Open House days or evenings where WE is discussed & questions can be answered."

I know literally dozens of people who have tried to ask about Anthroposophy at such evenings. The topic is definitely NOT Anthroposophy and people who host these evenings are quite accustomed to receiving the question. There is a one or two sentence response that says something vague like "Anthroposophy is a philosophy that some of our teachers may study. It is not in our school." This not only shuts up the parent asking the question but it puts any other parents who had questions about Anthroposophy at ease. Parents who want to ask deeper questions are told that this is not the right place - or are told to ask privately after the meeting. If a parent does this, it's usually two people they must face and the two people can be quite convincing. They might even be told about some wacko critics who are trying to "smear" or "demonize" Waldorf education.

"2. Parent/teacher meetings alone or in groups as parents of a class"

In order to go to parent/teacher meetings, the parents must have already enrolled their child in the school. This is unacceptable. After the parent has been misled into enrolling is not the appropriate time to offer resources about Anthroposophy.

3. School brochure or website with links to information about Anthroposophy

Again, the parent has to KNOW to look up Anthroposophy. Additionally, the links to Anthroposophy are not going to include sites where the "difficult" material is displayed or discussed. Links to the "Bob and Nancy" site and AWSNA site are not helpful to parents seeking an unbiased look at Anthroposophy. In fact, such links are as misleading as teachers saying "Anthroposophy is not in our Waldorf school".

4. Parent study groups on various WE/A related subjects

Again, PARENT study groups. Too late!!! The information needs to come BEFORE they are parents at the school. And parents are unlikely to join a study group about a religion they don't belong to just to find out what Anthroposophy is. They should be told up front - before they enroll their child.

5. Foundation year program studying anthroposophy

Again, you suggest that anyone interested in Waldorf should have to invest a tremendous amount of time and effort learning about Anthroposophy - when a few accurate sentences at the first parent orientation would be enough to let them know Waldorf is not for them.

6. Parent e-mail list with opportunities to ask questions, find resources

Parent e-mail lists are not allowed in our Waldorf school. We have a "Communications Protocol" that restricts parent communications. And, again, you are talking about parents and not prospective parents.

7. School library and bookstore with WE and A. related books available

I wouldn't disagree that a prospective parent could wander into the school library and pick up a book by Steiner. Usually, this requires some awareness of the influence Anthroposophy has on the school, but yes, Steiner is mentioned on the websites much more than Anthroposophy is, so a prospective parent looking for information on Steiner could buy a Steiner book and discover Anthroposophy pretty much by chance.

8. School newsletter where local A. Branch calendar & activities are listed

Prospective parents don't receive these typically. And you are asking prospective or even current parents to participate in local Anthroposophy lectures and seminars after they've been told Anthroposophy has nothing to do with their child's education.

9. Conferences on WE/A by well-known WE teachers, A speakers, etc.

Same thing as above. Some parents WILL sit through a conference or lecture about Anthroposophical medicine but many will consider it something they are not interested in because they've been told Anthroposophy is not part of their child's education.

10. Plays, festivals, fundraising events open to the public where materials books, etc. are available about WE/A.

You're double-dipping here. Yes, books again - we already covered this in the library question. Sure, books are available to parents and non-parents and prospective parents.

11. Waldorf or A related subscription lists or boards (See Deborah's resources again)

If they happen to find them. Most of the lists Deborah has provided are "support only" lists. That's very nice - except that people who express a dissenting opinion about Waldorf are booted off the list and their remarks removed. It's a "safe" place because it is not open to criticism. People looking for the truth about Waldorf are only misdirected by sites like these.

12. Local A branch library or the larger A lending library.

OK, so triple dipping... Yes, anyone can pick up books on Steiner - even Borders has them. The questions are - how do they know they need to and why should they have to?

13. Many bookstores now carry Steiner books. Amazon (and other services) has many used A - related books.

Got it... Read Steiner books and you will know what you are getting your child into - maybe. Even reading Steiner doesn't prepare parents for the strange behaviors exhibited by many if not most Waldorf teachers at many if not most, if not ALL Waldorf schools.

The point is Waldorf should tell prospective parents, up front, and long before they plunk their money down and make a decision that affects their child and their family, that Anthroposophy is not only part of Waldorf education, but that it IS Waldorf education and that everything that happens in a Waldorf school is based on Anthroposophy. It's not up to the parents to seek out sources of this information - it is Waldorf's responsibility to tell them - not by making source materials about Steiner available to them, but to TELL THEM directly.

Pete
post #26 of 165
All parents at our school should be very well aware that Waldorf education was developed by Rudolf Steiner, who based it on principles and ideas from anthroposophy. They are *not* told it "Isn't in the school". Obviously, the anthroposophy is in the methods, practice, and view of child development teachers use.

Parents *are* told "Anthroposophy isn't taught in the school". We all know that the teachers study it and use it. We all know this, though the parents probably all have their own interpretation what that means exactly. So would the teachers~~I GUARANTEE they don't all agree what this means exactly.

At our school, the parents know about Anthroposophy and they have ample opportunity to learn about it if they don't know what it is. The school displays books, it has a library that the adults can check out the books. They can ask the teachers, they can ask other anthroposophists who are in the parent body. There is even the occasional "Anthroposophy 101" offered during the evening, with very limited attendance by the way. And the wide body of information available on the internet has already been mentioned here.

I see a lot of tension about this question on some internet messageboards about the anthroposophy issue, and it seems most of it is focused on the teacher and their anthroposophical "motivation" for doing this or that. There really isn't that much dispute over what actually goes on in the classroom curriculum. What you see on display on visiting days, or outlined in the curriculum guides, or written up in the literature about Waldorf, that's what you're child is going to get. There is no secret little Anthroposophy 1A class that doesn't show up in the curriculum guide or anything like that. What you see is what you get.

But it seems some people become uneasy about what the teacher may have taken from the anthroposophy. For example, does the teacher believe they have karma with my child? Does the teacher think Steiner was clairvoyant? These are questions that go into the teacher's state of mind, and motivation, and though one can argue that answers to those questions may influence the child or the relationship between teacher and child, this is kind of a gray area where actually very few teachers are expected to divulge their personal beliefs like this. I can see why some parents are disturbed by this, but I wanted to kind of emphasize it is a very gray area there. Not all teachers are anthroposophists, and in my observation they vary a great deal in what they bring from anthroposophy to their own teaching and understandings about children. There really is no *code* to being an anthroposophist, so I'd be interested to hear from some what the definition of "anthroposophist" is to them. There is no official dogma attached to it that I'm aware of.

But nonetheless, I think it's interesting that in the case brought against Waldorf in public schools, the judge made it clear that the personal views of anthroposophists about the spiritual side of Waldorf education were irrelevant to the case judging whether or not the teaching itself was religious, saying "the anthroposophists' motivation is not at issue".

Linda
post #27 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaCl
All parents at our school should be very well aware that Waldorf education was developed by Rudolf Steiner, who based it on principles and ideas from anthroposophy. They are *not* told it "Isn't in the school". Obviously, the anthroposophy is in the methods, practice, and view of child development teachers use.
Maybe "obviously" to the parents, but not so obviously to the prospective parents. That's more the issue here. Let them know BEFORE they are parents in the school.
Quote:
Parents *are* told "Anthroposophy isn't taught in the school". We all know that the teachers study it and use it. We all know this, though the parents probably all have their own interpretation what that means exactly. So would the teachers~~I GUARANTEE they don't all agree what this means exactly.
Well, to me this means they are lying - but yes, we won't all agree on this. I've presented a pretty fair case here describing how Waldorf curriculum is absolutely filled with Anthroposophy. Saying it isn't "taught" is misleading - it is taught but not as a separate subject. It's this kind of misleading language that is the very reason why you can "GUARANTEE teachers won't agreee what this means exactly" because some see it clearly and some choose to split hairs.
Quote:
At our school, the parents know about Anthroposophy and they have ample opportunity to learn about it if they don't know what it is. The school displays books, it has a library that the adults can check out the books. They can ask the teachers, they can ask other anthroposophists who are in the parent body. There is even the occasional "Anthroposophy 101" offered during the evening, with very limited attendance by the way. And the wide body of information available on the internet has already been mentioned here.
Again, you are talking about PARENTS - not prospective parents. This is confusing the issue Linda. The Waldorf Resources we are reviewing here are the first thing prospective parents look to when considering Waldorf. If those resources are misleading, and if the very first parent orientation is misleading, then we really have a case of fraud existing - to the tune of $6000 - $9000 per case. Oh, sorry, legal talk makes people nervous...
Quote:
I see a lot of tension about this question on some internet messageboards about the anthroposophy issue, and it seems most of it is focused on the teacher and their anthroposophical "motivation" for doing this or that. There really isn't that much dispute over what actually goes on in the classroom curriculum.
Um... yes there is. There's lots of dispute about what goes on in the classroom curriculum and what goes on in the classroom that is not mentioned in the curriculum.
Quote:
What you see on display on visiting days, or outlined in the curriculum guides, or written up in the literature about Waldorf, that's what you're child is going to get.
Boy, talk about generalizations... That's exactly wrong Linda. It is NOT what your child is going to get - it is what Waldorf schools want to make you think your child is going to get. Otherwise, why all the deception? Why not be honest and straightforward with prospective parents about what Waldorf is and what it is based on? Prospective parent's first exposure to Waldorf is intended to draw them in under a false pretense. Plain and simple.

Quote:
There is no secret little Anthroposophy 1A class that doesn't show up in the curriculum guide or anything like that. What you see is what you get.
Anthroposophy permeates every subject - not just in Waldorf schools but in real life. It does not require its own class - it's in EVERY class.
Quote:
But it seems some people become uneasy about what the teacher may have taken from the anthroposophy. For example, does the teacher believe they have karma with my child? Does the teacher think Steiner was clairvoyant? These are questions that go into the teacher's state of mind, and motivation, and though one can argue that answers to those questions may influence the child or the relationship between teacher and child, this is kind of a gray area where actually very few teachers are expected to divulge their personal beliefs like this. I can see why some parents are disturbed by this, but I wanted to kind of emphasize it is a very gray area there.
Nobody is asking teachers to divulge their personal beliefs - but Waldorf schools and they way they teach are based on a set of beliefs that should be divulged to prospective parents. Once a prospective parent has accepted those beliefs, then it becomes their responsibility as a parent to understand or be comfortable with the particular teacher's personal beliefs to the extent the teacher wants to share them.
Quote:
Not all teachers are anthroposophists, and in my observation they vary a great deal in what they bring from anthroposophy to their own teaching and understandings about children. There really is no *code* to being an anthroposophist, so I'd be interested to hear from some what the definition of "anthroposophist" is to them. There is no official dogma attached to it that I'm aware of.
I like how you qualify the statements above. Sure there's a "code" to being an Anthroposophist - just like there's a "code" to being a Christian. It isn't so much a list of things Anthroposophists carry around with them, as it is a set of behavior patterns that are derived from attention, focus and acceptance of the religious philosophy of Steiner. Someone just posted a link about this on another site - I'll reproduce it here if you like.
Quote:
But nonetheless, I think it's interesting that in the case brought against Waldorf in public schools, the judge made it clear that the personal views of anthroposophists about the spiritual side of Waldorf education were irrelevant to the case judging whether or not the teaching itself was religious, saying "the anthroposophists' motivation is not at issue".
Actually, I think that was not in contention at all. And that's not the issue here at all - but a nice diversion. What is the issue is the many Waldorf Resource materials that are often the prospective parent's first encounter with Waldorf are intentionally misleading to omit information about the underlying philosophy that governs Waldorf education and that most Waldorf teachers accept as a life philosophy or religious faith.

Pete
post #28 of 165
Thread Starter 
Here's a link to the article mentioned above.

http://members.aol.com/kitmac/workon.htm

Pete
post #29 of 165
Pete

There's not much point in a back and forth "Does Not", "Does Too" type of thing. If you disagree, specifics would be helpful.

And the only specific you offered where there's really anything to discuss was the link you offered in support of your argument about what anthroposophy "is", an article that I'm guessing you couldn't find one in a hundred anthroposophists actually Agree With. What's the point to this? The author of it is essentially laudatory about Waldorf, biodynamics and other such initiatives which began before Steiner died. She criticizes the fact that anthroposophy hasn't really produced any innovative new disciplines since then. The theory she makes to explain this is essentially a lot of he said/she said soap opera rumors about Steiner and a woman and whether or not he was very nice in the way he dumped her and talked to her in public.

What's the point? Prospective parents should be given this to read? Gimmeabreak.

This is just too bizarre.

Linda
post #30 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaCl
Pete

There's not much point in a back and forth "Does Not", "Does Too" type of thing. If you disagree, specifics would be helpful.
What "specifics" did you have in mind Linda? Read the entire thread about Waldorf curriculum and how it is infused with Anthroposophy. Is that specific enough for you or are you expecting me to name which teachers are teaching which things?
Quote:
And the only specific you offered where there's really anything to discuss was the link you offered in support of your argument about what anthroposophy "is", an article that I'm guessing you couldn't find one in a hundred anthroposophists actually Agree With.
Of course Anthroposophists wouldn't agree with this assessment. So what? I don't think it's possible to find two Anthroposophists that agree on anything frankly. That's why we have to go to sources like Steiner to find out what Anthroposophy was intended to be and to sources post-Steiner to find out what Anthroposophy has become. You are welcome to provide your own sources describing Anthroposophy - this is not a closed thread. People who are outside of Anthroposophy see it differently than people who are caught up in it. That should be obvious.
Quote:
What's the point to this? The author of it is essentially laudatory about Waldorf, biodynamics and other such initiatives which began before Steiner died. She criticizes the fact that anthroposophy hasn't really produced any innovative new disciplines since then. The theory she makes to explain this is essentially a lot of he said/she said soap opera rumors about Steiner and a woman and whether or not he was very nice in the way he dumped her and talked to her in public.
I thought the article made a lot of good points - and frankly Steiner was a petty little man about some things - it's nice to point that out to the "Steiner is God" people sometimes. And really, not too much has come of Anthroposophy since Steiner died. It's pretty much a dead movement. There are a few people trying to move it along - like Prokofieff, but he's way out there as far as I'm concerned. Nothing really new - just rehashing and microwaving the Steiner leftovers.
Quote:
What's the point? Prospective parents should be given this to read? Gimmeabreak.
Nope. I didn't say that now did I?
Quote:
This is just too bizarre.
Let's let each person judge for themselves.

Pete
Linda[/QUOTE]
post #31 of 165
Thread Starter 
Here's a recent post of a Waldorf school website.

http://www.watersedgeschool.com/

Once again, the typical no mention of Anthroposophy. Some of the links don't even mention Anthroposophy - but they mention the Right wing/Left wing fundamentalist extremist group of people in California that are smearing Waldorf's good name. Most of the links are to our Waldorfanswers friend. Parents looking at the website have no idea of the connection between Anthroposophy and Waldorf.

Pete
post #32 of 165
Thread Starter 
This site:

http://www.olympiawaldorf.org/

was posted by a member here.

While it only mentions Anthroposophy once in passing (that I noticed), DOES have the Parent Handbook available for viewing. In the parent handbook, one can see references to Steiner and Anthroposophy and an elementary explanation of Anthroposophy is given. The #1 responsibility of the "core group" of the school is listed as the study of Anthroposophy - so it's pretty clear to a parent that there is something here worth investigating. The deceptive statement "Anthroposophy is not taught" is there, however, but still, this site seems better than most because of the inclusion of the parent handbook. I think a reasonable parent would have enough clues to look beyond what is being said and find out about Anthroposophy.

Pete
post #33 of 165
Here's the FAQ section for another school: http://www.waldorfinnorthcoastal.org..._questions.php
It does mention anthroposophy quite a few times and tries to briefly explain it. It then gives links to anthroposophy web sites.
Janine
post #34 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratlover
Here's the FAQ section for another school: http://www.waldorfinnorthcoastal.org..._questions.php
It does mention anthroposophy quite a few times and tries to briefly explain it. It then gives links to anthroposophy web sites.
Janine
Thanks Janine, the FAQ on this site is very well done and, while not perfect, still much better than most sites. It gives a brief explanation of the critical questions many parents have and doesn't conspicuously omit "difficult" topics. Good job North Coastal

Pete
post #35 of 165
Thread Starter 
Here's an excellent study right off AWSNA's website. It explores how Waldorf's approach to science differs from other schools.

http://www.awsna.org/jelinekarticle.pdf
post #36 of 165
Thread Starter 
Here are two Waldorf school websites. These schools are somehow connected to each other - like sister schools or one is the offshoot of the other:

http://www.kimberton.org/index.html

is the second oldest Waldorf school in the US. You would think somewhere on their entire website the word "Anthroposophy" might have found a spot. Is Kimberton misrepresenting itself by not revealing that it has a connection to Anthroposophy? If it was a Scientology school, or a Christian school or a Jewish school would parents expect them to display this?

Let's look at the sister school's website.

http://www.susquehanna.org/

Susquehanna Waldorf School one goes a step further. No mention of Anthroposophy AND no mention of Rudolf Steiner either. Parents looking for information are hard-pressed to find it here. Lots of pictures on both sites - kids having lots of fun and doing interesting projects. Oh well... perhaps the failure to mention Anthroposophy is just an oversight.

Pete
post #37 of 165
I know nothing about either school, but Susquehanna does link a LOT of good information about Waldorf on Waldorfanswers. First page at waldorfanswers:

"Waldorf or Rudolf Steiner education is a unique form of education from preschool through high school, which is based on the view that the human being is a being of body, soul and spirit. The specific methods used in Waldorf schools come from the view that the child develops through a number of basic stages from childhood to adulthood. The Waldorf curriculum is specifically designed to work with the child through these stages of development.

"Waldorf education was developed by Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925) at the beginning of the 20th century. It is based on Steiner's broader philosophy and teachings, called anthroposophy (literally, wisdom or knowledge of man).

"Anthroposophy holds that the human being is fundamentally a spiritual being and that all human beings deserve respect as the embodiment of their spiritual nature. This view is carried into Waldorf education as striving to develop in each child their innate talents and abilities. Waldorf schools operate in a non-discriminatory way, without regard to race, gender, ethnicity, religion or national origin. "

Very cool.

Linda
post #38 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete

Let's look at the sister school's website.

http://www.susquehanna.org/

Susquehanna Waldorf School one goes a step further. No mention of Anthroposophy AND no mention of Rudolf Steiner either. Parents looking for information are hard-pressed to find it here. Lots of pictures on both sites - kids having lots of fun and doing interesting projects. Oh well... perhaps the failure to mention Anthroposophy is just an oversight.

Pete

If one goes to the Susquehanna School's page with links
on it, you will find:

http://www.susquehanna.org/waldorf-links.htm

helpful links

The links below will take you to websites where you can learn more about Waldorf Education.

Waldorf Answers
A site dedicated to providing in depth answers about Waldorf education for parents and prospective parents. This site also serves to clear up some of the misconceptions that may exist about Waldorf education.


Association of Waldorf Schools in North America
AWSNA is an assocation of independent Waldorf schools and Waldorf teacher education institutes. Their mission is to strengthen and support the schools and to inform the public about the benefits of Waldorf Education.


Anthroposophical Society in America
Information and resources about Rudolf Steiner and anthroposophical activity in North America.


Bob and Nancy's Services
The largest English language web site for information on Waldorf Schools and Anthroposophy.
post #39 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serena Blaue
If one goes to the Susquehanna School's page with links
on it, you will find:

http://www.susquehanna.org/waldorf-links.htm

helpful links

The links below will take you to websites where you can learn more about Waldorf Education.

Waldorf Answers
A site dedicated to providing in depth answers about Waldorf education for parents and prospective parents. This site also serves to clear up some of the misconceptions that may exist about Waldorf education.


Association of Waldorf Schools in North America
AWSNA is an assocation of independent Waldorf schools and Waldorf teacher education institutes. Their mission is to strengthen and support the schools and to inform the public about the benefits of Waldorf Education.


Anthroposophical Society in America
Information and resources about Rudolf Steiner and anthroposophical activity in North America.


Bob and Nancy's Services
The largest English language web site for information on Waldorf Schools and Anthroposophy.
{Sigh} If there's no mention of Anthroposophy on the site, why would parents think they need to go to all these links?

Does everyone here see why I need to repeat myself so often?

Pete
post #40 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete
{Sigh} If there's no mention of Anthroposophy on the site, why would parents think they need to go to all these links?

Does everyone here see why I need to repeat myself so often?

Pete

Diligent, caring and careful parents will go to the links for further information about Waldorf Education because they are interested to know more beyond the general information that any private school website of a few pages can offer.

Serena
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