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who pays for elective c-sections? - Page 2

post #21 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belle
Yeah, I can't believe how much my unmedicated vaginal birth in a hospital cost. It was outrageous. I find it hard to believe that a c/s doesn't cost the hospital more.
The site is down but the hospital closest to me has a prepayment plan for birth. I think c/s was double what unmed birth was. But the site is down and I can't remember exactly but I think it was $1800 for unmed and $3600 for c/s. And of course this is for out of pocket not insurance companies. I am sure they get alot more from insurance co than they do from out of pocket since thats always the way it works.

Michelle
post #22 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by WinterBaby
I think I read that these days c-section and regular birthing costs at a hospital are comparable, therefore I don't think insurance companies have that large a stake either way a woman births.
By the time you factor in the IVs, epidurals, monitors, etc. that have become a "normal" part of birth, I wouldn't be surprised if that's true. You have to pay for a lot of the same things, either way.
post #23 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna
I'm pro-choice, but I don't pay for women's abortions (most insurance doesn't cover them, I know mine doesn't) and so, sure, if you want to schedule an elective c- go for it. But don't ask me (or the insurance...) to pay.

-Angela
Would you be against insurance companies paying for abortions?
post #24 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by leomom
Would you be against insurance companies paying for abortions?

It would depend. I would be against them paying for SOME elective procedures and not ALL elective procedures. (for the sake of argument I'll leave out medically needed terminations... that's a different issue) I am not against the idea of insurance covering abortion. BUT if they do, then in my mind they should also cover birth control, homebirth, nose jobs and any other medical anything that the people want.

how's that for confusing?

-Angela
post #25 of 52
Careful speaking about abortion. If I recall, threads have been yanked for such discussion, though I never really understood why (I guess I missed whatever happened to cause that being a huge no-no topic around here)

Elective vs Convenience -- Well, yeah, I think we're talking about convenience c/s. Though for what it's worth, I'd rather see insurance pay to encourage women to have VBACs, encourage the medical community to provide information towards making sucha choice, than forthem to just pay for c/s. No offense meant to anyone who has had to face the decision of whether to VBAC or not, especially in these newly-hostile anti-VBAC timesat many hospitals.

Namaste, Tara
mama to Doodle (6), Butterfly (2), and Rythm (due at home 1/06)
post #26 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by leomom
If you're pro choice b/c a woman should be able to be in charge of her own body...well...wouldn't the same hold true for elective c-sections?


As far as insurance, etc. my doctor gave me a copy of the law that forces insurance to pay for elective c sections. I don't still have it, so I don't know if it was a state or federal law. I guess I could make my husband look it up if anyone really wants to know. But the wording was basically similar to the pro choice wording...her body, her choice.
I'd be very interested
post #27 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride
I could be wrong, but I get the feeling this thread is aimed more at "convenience" sections. The term "elective" is misapplied all over the place where sections are concerned. It infuriates me.
I mean those without a real hard medical reason....some obviously for convenience I suppose.
post #28 of 52
I think the problem really for insurers is that we just don't have the staff or even access to enough people with the training to go through every claim we get for a CS and pick out from the notes in which cases the medical reason is bogus and in which cases it isn't. My regional insurance company alone processes over half a million claims a day... so unless there's something wrong, on our end most of those claims never even get seen by a human being. Just scanned in, run through a computer and a reimbursement pops out the other end.
post #29 of 52
In the UK (around a 20% c-sec rate so slightly better than US and Australia) each c-sec goes before a peer review panel and the OB has to justify it. That would alleviate the problem of insurers having to do it.
post #30 of 52
I was actually referring solely to matters of birth choice. I demand the right, as an intelligent, thinking individual, to decide that I consider the risks small enough to take. And I cannot, in good conscience, demand my right to a VBAC while denying another woman her right to an ERC. I am well aware that there are other reasonable, intelligent women out there who can look at the same statistics as I, and decide that any risk of uterine rupture is too much.

By the same token, if she should be forced to justify her c-section, I should be forced to justify my VBAC.
post #31 of 52
OK, I'm confused today, what is the difference between elective and convenience?
post #32 of 52
Personally, I see elective as someone who has had a previous section or has been given information that would lead a Mama to believe that a C/S would be safer for her birth.
Convenience might be someone whio has a C/S to deliver at a certain time, to avoid the pain/inconvenience of labor, basically a reason that is not a medical reason.
That is JMHO of course.
post #33 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by mara
OK, I'm confused today, what is the difference between elective and convenience?
The medical profession only classes c-sections as "emergency" and "elective". So, the two c-sections I was bullied into having for stupid reasons are both "elective"...even though the last one was under threat of losing my care provider - at 41w, 4d...and about four hours before I went into labour.

Technically, I suppose it was "elective", as I did sign the papers...but I wasn't really given any options.
post #34 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Heart
The site is down but the hospital closest to me has a prepayment plan for birth. I think c/s was double what unmed birth was. But the site is down and I can't remember exactly but I think it was $1800 for unmed and $3600 for c/s. And of course this is for out of pocket not insurance companies. I am sure they get alot more from insurance co than they do from out of pocket since thats always the way it works.

Michelle
My unmed birth was around $4000 including postpartum care and nursery care. Even though my dd was never in the nursery. My out of pocket cost was about a grand.
post #35 of 52
Quote:
The medical profession only classes c-sections as "emergency" and "elective".
Exactly. It is a great frustration of mine. When you hear the term elective, it leads you to think the person elected (chose) to do something. And the truth is a good deal of elective c-sections happen because the mother has no other choice. Consider a baby in a transverse lie--babies can't come out sideways; it's physically impossible. So mama has to have a c-section. That's going to be marked down on her paperwork as an elective c-section. I had two c-sections because of breech babies, and I really had no other choice at the time, as the hospital I was at only sectioned breeches. But it was still marked down as elective, as if I could have, I don't know, reached up there and yanked the kid out myself instead.

That's why I've got such issues with the attacks on elective c-sections. If you have a c-section because you have no real way to go against hospital policy (esp. in regards to a breech) or any of the other number of valid reasons, it's not the same as scheduling a c-section because you don't want to be bothered with labor.

And if you say that "elective" c-sections shouldn't be covered by insurance, you encounter the issue of why should any certain type of birth be covered by insurance. You want insurance to accept your desire for a home waterbirth, then you'd better be prepared for insurance to accept Mrs X's desire for a c-section.
post #36 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagesgirl
And if you say that "elective" c-sections shouldn't be covered by insurance, you encounter the issue of why should any certain type of birth be covered by insurance. You want insurance to accept your desire for a home waterbirth, then you'd better be prepared for insurance to accept Mrs X's desire for a c-section.
This led me to an interesting thought. Maybe the birth climate would be better if we went back to when birth wasn't usually covered by insurance...

I'd be happy to pay for my homebirths out of pocket if everyone else paid for their births out of pocket...

-Angela
post #37 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna
This led me to an interesting thought. Maybe the birth climate would be better if we went back to when birth wasn't usually covered by insurance...

I'd be happy to pay for my homebirths out of pocket if everyone else paid for their births out of pocket...

-Angela

Ah, but then what's the point of carrying more than catastrophic health insurance? I'm young and healthy - prental care and birth are the biggest healthcare expenses I'm likely to face for a while, LOL. A few thousand dollars is a large chunk of annual income for us paycheck to paycheck types. That would be a lovely way to turn the birth of a child into an enormously dreaded financial disaster I think. Which is why we're at where we're at I suppose.
post #38 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanetF
In the UK (around a 20% c-sec rate so slightly better than US and Australia) each c-sec goes before a peer review panel and the OB has to justify it. That would alleviate the problem of insurers having to do it.
This is what was done in the U.S. before 1960. Any doctor who had a higher than 12% rate of caesarean section delivery was considered a pariah.

I seem to remember that pregnancy and delivery were not even covered by health insurance at that time also since pregnancy and birth were considered normal functions of the human body and not accidents.

I know I read that in one of my Father's many books.
post #39 of 52
The title of this thread asks, "Who pays for elective Caesarean Sections?"

The answer is, "We all do."

WE all pay for them in the form of higher taxes, higher hospital costs and higher insurance rates.

If the baby is premature and has health or learning problems later in life, we pay for that also.
post #40 of 52
You're exactly right that would make us only need insurance for big things too. We haven't used our insurance for ANYTHING except the birth- and we have good insurance. Paycheck to paycheck here too....

-Angela
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