or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › Books, Music, and Media › Most Boring Book on the Planet?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Most Boring Book on the Planet? - Page 3

post #41 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremade
It took be a bit to really get into Pride & Prejudice, but once I did i LOVED it! It's one of my favorites. DUNE on the other hand is the most boring book on the face of the earth. Ok, so some people really love it; perhaps I'm just not in to science fiction.

DUNE is one of DP's favorites, but I never got into it. I guess I'm just not into scifi or fantasy, but I HP!
post #42 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Baudelaire
riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend
of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.
Sir Tristram, violer d'amores, fr'over the short sea, had passencore rearrived from North Armorica on this side the scraggy isthmus of Europe Minor to wielderfight his penisolate war: nor had topsawyer's rocks by the stream Oconee exaggerated themselse to Laurens County's gorgios while they went doublin their mumper all the time: nor avoice from afire bellowsed mishe mishe to tauftauf thuartpeatrick: not yet, though venissoon after, had a kidscad buttended a bland old isaac: not yet, though all's fair in vanessy, were sosie sesthers wroth with twone nathandjoe. Rot a peck of pa's malt had Jhem or Shen brewed by arclight and rory end to the regginbrow was to be seen ringsome on the aquaface.
The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronn tuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnu k!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsy. The great fall of theoffwall entailed at such short notice the pftjschute of Finnegan, erse solid man, that the humptyhillhead of humself prumptly sends an unquiring one well to the west in quest of his tumptytumtoes: and their upturnpikepointandplace is at the knock out in the park where oranges have been laid to rust upon the green since devlinsfirst loved livvy.
huh?
post #43 of 202
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SKK
huh?
Okay, if you really, really want an explanation. Here's my take on it. I've never read this whole book, so bear with me...



Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Baudelaire
riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend
of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.

A possible allusion to the book of Genesis here, not only with the "Eve and Adam's" allusion, but the "riverrun" alludes to the four rivers that originally ran through the Garden of Eden.

Sir Tristram, violer d'amores,

Sir Tristram is an allusion to the Arthurian knight of the same name who fell in love with Isolde, engaged to the Irish King Mark. Tristram is therefore a "violer d'amores" (a thief of love).

fr'over the short sea, had passencore rearrived from North Armorica

I love this version of "North America," obviously suggesting an armored / armed state. Just as true now as it was then.

on this side the scraggy isthmus of Europe Minor to wielderfight his penisolate war:

One of my favorite words. It could mean so many things:

Peninsula + isolation = suggesting a land mass both apart of and apart from the "scraggy isthmus of Europe Minor," which is a decent description of Ireland.

Pen is so late = Suggesting an author's futility in writing: it's always after the fact.

Penis so late
Penis isolate = Another lonely peninsula. Of sorts.


nor had topsawyer's rocks by the stream Oconee exaggerated themselse to Laurens County's gorgios while they went doublin

A pun, of course, on "Dublin."

their mumper all the time: nor avoice from afire bellowsed mishe mishe

Suggesting my/she or me/she


to tauftauf thuartpeatrick:

Thou art Patrick (the patron saint of Ireland)?

not yet, though venissoon after, had a kidscad buttended a bland old isaac: not yet, though all's fair in vanessy, were sosie sesthers wroth with twone nathandjoe.

Twone = Two and one, two into one, like "nathan and joe" are blended into two/one name, "nathanjoe."

Rot a peck of pa's malt had Jhem or Shen brewed by arclight and rory end to the regginbrow was to be seen ringsome on the aquaface.
The fall

Of humankind, I suppose -- ties in with the allusion to Eden.

(bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronn tuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnu k!)

This, to me, suggests a "fall" of language into Babel.


of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsy. The great fall of theoffwall entailed at such short notice the pftjschute of Finnegan, erse solid man,

Erse - suggests "erstwhile," but also arse -- an arse-solid man.

that the humptyhillhead

Goes with the idea of "the great fall of the offwall -- Humpty Dumpty's fall from a wall, I guess.


of humself prumptly sends an unquiring one well to the west in quest of his tumptytumtoes: and their upturnpikepointandplace is at the knock out in the park where oranges have been laid to rust upon the green since devlins first loved livvy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SKK
huh?
Okay, now what the whole bloody thing MEANS?
Can't help you there.
post #44 of 202
I tried to read that passage, CB. I cannot. "passencore rearrived" makes me want to punch someone in the face.

I read a short story by Hemingway once that made me feel violent like this. The story was bland and boring. It contained so few words, I wondered if he read anything beyond Dick and Jane books. I could liken reading the story to eating cardboard, but with the cardboard, there'd be something to chew. Actually, the discussion of the story and the teacher's insistence there was symbolism in there and that this was the work of a brilliant word master made me so mad I broke a pencil at my desk and left the class in tears. I took it personally, I guess. I loved the teacher and was sad she didn't realize how wrong she was about Hemingway.

I eventually forgave her for this, but have never given him a second chance.
post #45 of 202
I can't say I'm a big Hemingway fan, but I did really like My Old Man. I read it about 10 years ago, and can't remember if it's a novella or a short story. I found it to be an incredibly moving portrayal of a young boy's love for his dad. Maybe that one could be your second chance? Although I know what you mean in a way, because I have not given F. Scott Fitzgerald another chance after reading Great Gatsby.
post #46 of 202
This book didn't bore me, it made me so mad that I threw it across the room. Absolute Power, it was made into a movie starring Clint Eastwood. In the book his character is murdered by the Presidents bodyguards, and it s***ed......

This is the only book made into a movie that I thought the movie blew the book out of the water.
post #47 of 202
The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand had me falling asleep on the subway on more than one occasion. I never made it through. 100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez had me going nuts because it's basically a 2 sentence book that lasts a couple hundred pages.

On the flipside, The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins and Love in the Time of Cholera by Marquez had me missing my stop and oftentimes going to the end of the line (in Boston, which wasn't that far off from home).

Sadly, I have no time to read these days.
post #48 of 202
I remember hating Watership Down as a kid---can't even remember it--but I remember hating it.

I keep picking up "Lila's Feast"---it's sooooooooooooooo slllllllllooooooowwwwwwwww------hopefully it picks up----I paid for it so I'm going to read it!
post #49 of 202
Wow, thanks CB!
post #50 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by AEZMama
The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand had me falling asleep on the subway on more than one occasion. I never made it through.
Atlas Shrugged?

There is a whole institution in Santa Monica, CA dedicated to the writings of Ayn Rand and a whole political movement, rather libertarian in nature...

Her real name is Hannah Rosenberg and she escaped Russian during the revolution...

Most of the people who survived were socialists or had leanings that way politically, but she was different.
post #51 of 202
I tried to read Something Wicked This Way Comes in highschool and NEVER got through it. I tried again two years ago, thinking I was to young then and still could not get through it.

Another that I did not like then was Animal Farm. I probably would have no problem with it now.

I have tried twice recently to read 1984 but have failed. I think that has to do with the type though. I bought one of the cheap copies where the type is about this small and all cramped together so I felt like I was never getting anywhere.

I am reading Love in a Time of Cholera right now though, and to see so many people who liked it makes me
post #52 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mackenzie
I have tried twice recently to read 1984 but have failed
The movie is a snooze also....
post #53 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Baudelaire
Shameful confession time: I'm an English teacher.

I hate almost all American literature except for two types of writers: the freaks and the geeks.

Freaks: Poe, Whitman, Dickinson
Geeks: Dickinson, Hawthorne
I completely disagree...how can you NOT include Joyce as a freak? he was a *HUGE FREAK!!!*


:LOL

I am a wee bit embarassed to find many favorites here as well..P&P and Emma? But they are so funny....I love Dune as well (all of them)

I am kind of a nerd though. *L

I agree with Aimee21972, I once thought I was "terribly clever" and decided to read the unabridged version of Moby Dick.

I soon learned there are clear reasons why some things are abridged. :LOL I couldn't get through it..I am still covered in shame...only book I gave up on. *L
post #54 of 202
Moby Dick is considered by some "experts" (however anyone gets that title) to be one of the ten worst novels ever eritten.
post #55 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by abimommy
I completely disagree...how can you NOT include Joyce as a freak? he was a *HUGE FREAK!!!*
he's not american

i found "reading lolita in tehran" to be tremendously painful to get through.

i agree that "old man and the sea" is macho bs. ugh!
post #56 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildmonkeys
I hated - The Old Man and the Sea - I know people loved it but I hate boats & fishing and it just made me want to scream....
Yup, me too. Amazing how a book that short can feel so long.
post #57 of 202
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mackenzie
I tried to read Something Wicked This Way Comes in highschool and NEVER got through it. I tried again two years ago, thinking I was to young then and still could not get through it.

Honestly? I have never made it through a Ray Bradbury book. People have raved about Fahrenheit 451, but when I tried to read it, I found the characters shallow & the assumptions absurdly sexist.

Quote:
Another that I did not like then was Animal Farm. I probably would have no problem with it now.

I have tried twice recently to read 1984 but have failed. I think that has to do with the type though. I bought one of the cheap copies where the type is about this small and all cramped together so I felt like I was never getting anywhere.
Try the movie with John Hurt. It's pretty faithful to the book -- but the book is way better.
post #58 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by chellemarie
I tried to read that passage, CB. I cannot. "passencore rearrived" makes me want to punch someone in the face.
:

Quote:
Originally Posted by chellemarie
I read a short story by Hemingway once that made me feel violent like this. The story was bland and boring. It contained so few words, I wondered if he read anything beyond Dick and Jane books. I could liken reading the story to eating cardboard, but with the cardboard, there'd be something to chew. Actually, the discussion of the story and the teacher's insistence there was symbolism in there and that this was the work of a brilliant word master made me so mad I broke a pencil at my desk and left the class in tears. I took it personally, I guess. I loved the teacher and was sad she didn't realize how wrong she was about Hemingway.

I eventually forgave her for this, but have never given him a second chance.
I thought I was the only one who actually got this emotional about books! Chewing cardboard...
post #59 of 202
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by abimommy
I completely disagree...how can you NOT include Joyce as a freak? he was a *HUGE FREAK!!!*


:LOL
Because Joyce was an Irish freak, not an American one.
But yeah, bIIIIIIG freak.

Quote:
I am a wee bit embarassed to find many favorites here as well..P&P and Emma? But they are so funny....I love Dune as well (all of them)

I am kind of a nerd though. *L
Dune is one of my favorites too!!!
Quote:

I agree with Aimee21972, I once thought I was "terribly clever" and decided to read the unabridged version of Moby Dick.

I soon learned there are clear reasons why some things are abridged. :LOL I couldn't get through it..I am still covered in shame...only book I gave up on. *L
If you'd like to uncover your shame, my recommendation is that you try this book first because it's AWESOME -- one of the best nonfiction books I've read -- and the inspiration for Moby-Dick:
In the Heart of the Sea
post #60 of 202
I agree with pp about James Joyce. I've tried, in an attempt to be well-read, to read his work and I CAN'T DO IT. Does anyone actually enjoy reading Joyce??? I think I'd rather have a root canal.

Heart of Darkness by Conrad is another book that I can't stand. I'm so glad I'm not in school anymore and forced to read stuff that makes me want to drive nails into my skull.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Books, Music, and Media
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › Books, Music, and Media › Most Boring Book on the Planet?