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Nurses, Student Nurses, Pre-req takers - Page 48

post #941 of 1533

MRSA and Pregnancy

On my floor the charge nurse would try not to assign the really heavy patients or the ones in isolation (MRSA, VRE) to the pregnant nurses if at all possible. But any of us COULD have still cared for those patients. When I was newly pregnant with ds#2 I was in my last semester of nursing school. My clinical instructor found out I was pregnant when I was given a patient with shingles and I asked to be switched. It was no problem. I have since discovered that if you have reasonable acquired immunity to chickenpox then even while pregnant being around someone with shingles doesn't pose an increased risk to the fetus.
Back to the OP. Treat EVERYONE like they have MRSA/VRE/HIV/AIDS and you'll be a lot better off. People at the grocery store are far more worrisome than the ones that are "visibly marked" and contained in isolation. What happens as soon as you discharge someone that was in isolation that is a chronic carrier of MRSA? They ride down on the elevator to the parking lot with a new mom and 48 hour old baby, and then stop at the store on their way home for their prescriptions.
post #942 of 1533
Who else is so glad this semester is over. I just had my last final today. I was ready to run out of the class jumping up and down. I am so glad I am done with patho. I now get to start actual nursing classes in January. So anyone else with me on being relived this semester is done?
post #943 of 1533
I was so happy this semester was over. I need a break.

I'm in Oklahoma City so we have a major ice storm right now. We were without power or heat for 5 days. All the grocery stores were without power and closed, even walmart was closed--so we had nothing to eat for close to 2 days and were living off bread and milk (I put the milk in the ice outside) and diet coke and crackers and cereal and water. It has been awful and scary. There are still 300,000 people here without power so I am blessed to have it. A tree fell on our house in the middle of the night and broke the roof (but didn't come all the way through). And during all that I still had to study for finals by sitting in my car with the heat on and the light.

Hope everyone enjoys their break. We have a snowstorm coming into tonight so I'm gonna go rent some movies for the weekend.
post #944 of 1533
Quote:
Originally Posted by not now View Post
You totally have a right to switch patients because you're worried of exposure, if you didn't wait to the last minute. Also it should be used sparingly. I''m not saying you're using it constantly but just a consideration. No instructor likes a student who seems to be constantly bailing out.

On my floor nurses have no problem switching out with a pregnant nurse to keep her safe.
We get our assignments the night before, so it's not a lot of notice. This time, however, was slightly different because I had microbiology the night before (clinical was on a different day this week) so I had to call my instructor and get the info over the phone (vs. look through the charts myself). So I got the info from her- and she never mentioned MRSA- I think she completely overlooked it. So I didn't know about it until I arrived that morning.
If anything, I caused myself a ton of additional work- there were more meds to look up, conditions to research..
post #945 of 1533
Quote:
Originally Posted by CNM2B View Post
I got pregnant my very last quarter of nursing school. I found out on a Tuesday and went to clinical the next day and was assigned a post-op patient with MRSA. I was worried like you and went to my clinical instructor with my concern--she was great and said that she understood and that although she felt my risk was next to zero, she would assign me a different (non infectious) patient. You are a Mom now and totally responsible for another human being--if taking care of that patient makes you uncomfortable (even though we all agree that the risk is so so low) then I say that you should voice your opinions and get another patient. I'm sure switching you to someone else won't be difficult. One thing that I have learned from being a nurse and a Mom--FOLLOW YOUR INSTINCTS (they rarely lead you astray).
thanks I usually try to follow my instincts as much as possible..
I was just frustrated. There were 3 students and 45 patients to choose from- and she had to give me the only one on contact precautions that day? It wasn't any additional work for her to give me a new patient- I'm the one who had to do additional work
I've been gathering a lot of info to e-mail to her, to show that it's a rather controversial topic and I'm not being a drama queen to be a little apprehensive.
Basically, if I'd had time to research it the night before, I would have been better prepared.
But a lot of the things I'm reading say that I have right to be somewhat concerned and I don't see why you wouldn't avoid exposure during pg, if you have the option to.
Basically, from what I've learned, any other clinical instructor wouldn't have even batted an eye. I'm just lucky and got the one clinical instructor who thrives on making students cry and treating them like crap (and she's made quite a few enemies on the floor as well )- up until now I've flown under the radar and other people have been her targets.
So it's been an interesting semester.
But.. the semester is over and I did well. So I'm pleased. I'm just going to let this whole thing go and pray that I get assigned to a different hospital next time so I don't have to deal with her ever again!
post #946 of 1533
I just have to say how I still thank goodness I'm out of nursing school (it's been 8 years)

Love being a nurse though!
post #947 of 1533
Hey everyone! I haven't posted in this forum in a while, but I need some advice. I just finished my first semester taking pre-reqs for nursing (two classes were pass/fail to take a state test), and received an A in my "regular" class. Of course, yay, but I was a bit shocked when I saw how very little that bumped up my overall GPA, which is now a sad 2.39. I did some calculations and realized it would take me a LONG time to get my GPA up even close to what the average is for those accepted into the nursing program at my school. And that's IF I got all A's. Big if.

So, now I'm discouraged. I was thinking that in three semesters I'd have my pre-reqs taken care of to apply, and would have upped my GPA enough in the process to have a fighting chance, but now that plan seems to be out the window.

Anyone know how much they take into consideration you institutional GPA vs overall GPA?

Should I go to plan B and apply to nursing school at the community college to get my associates?

Also, I've been wondering this for a while now: Does anyone know of any schools with a reputation for having a less medical-model centered master's program for CNM's? For example, somewhere that offered o.o.h clinicals? I've heard Vanderbilt in Tennessee?

Anyone who has read all this, bless you!
post #948 of 1533
Quote:
Originally Posted by gratefulmama2isaac View Post

Also, I've been wondering this for a while now: Does anyone know of any schools with a reputation for having a less medical-model centered master's program for CNM's? For example, somewhere that offered o.o.h clinicals? I've heard Vanderbilt in Tennessee?
Don't know about Vanderbilt, but at my school we have at least one OOH preceptor.
post #949 of 1533
Quote:
Originally Posted by gratefulmama2isaac View Post


Should I go to plan B and apply to nursing school at the community college to get my associates?
I don't know where you are, but I know in NY some of the community colleges "forgive" your past academic experience if you need them to, so that only your current work shows up on your transcript.

I also believe in applying even if you don't think you have what they want- it never hurts to be in the pipeline, and the master's program I want to go into even told me to apply before I had my bachelor's, so that I would be in the system and they could keep an eye on me and advise me. My community college also awards points for the following year if you apply to nursing, meet the requirements, but don't get a seat.

But since all programs are different in what they are looking for/are willing to overlook, your advisor is probably the best person to help you- or call the nursing department at your school directly; often if you make an appointment to discuss how best to become a competetive candidate, they are more than willing to tell you exactly what you need to do.

Good luck!
post #950 of 1533
I'm just starting on the path to FNP. Right now I am at square one. I am weighing out my options for LPN-RN, RN-BSN, etc. It is all very confusing. But I am excited to see all of the rest of you. Wish me luck!
post #951 of 1533
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxmama View Post
Don't know about Vanderbilt, but at my school we have at least one OOH preceptor.
Maxmama, what school are you in?
post #952 of 1533
[QUOTE=gratefulmama2isaac;10080726]Hey everyone! I haven't posted in this forum in a while, but I need some advice. I just finished my first semester taking pre-reqs for nursing (two classes were pass/fail to take a state test), and received an A in my "regular" class. Of course, yay, but I was a bit shocked when I saw how very little that bumped up my overall GPA, which is now a sad 2.39. I did some calculations and realized it would take me a LONG time to get my GPA up even close to what the average is for those accepted into the nursing program at my school. And that's IF I got all A's. Big if.

So, now I'm discouraged. I was thinking that in three semesters I'd have my pre-reqs taken care of to apply, and would have upped my GPA enough in the process to have a fighting chance, but now that plan seems to be out the window.

Anyone know how much they take into consideration you institutional GPA vs overall GPA?

QUOTE]

Nursing schools are generally pretty competitive. It depends on the school though with how they factor in your GPA. My school has a 2.5 minimum, but you actually have to have a lot higher than that because there are so many applicants. BUT, here only your nursing pre reqs count toward the GPA they look at. They also accept academic forgiveness, which basically lets you throw away a semester that you did really badly in. The only thing is you lose the credit for any classes you took that semester and you can only use it once. I had a very bad first semester at college, so I used academic forgiveness for that and had no problems getting in. Every school is different though. I would suggest you look into the schools you want to apply to and talk to someone in the department about admissions and go from there.
post #953 of 1533
gratefulmama2isaac--
Since you want to be a CNM, you might consider getting your ADN and then applying to Frontier School of Midwifery and Family Nursing (www.midwives.org)for their "bridge" program (ADN-MSN). They require a 3.0 from the most RECENT degree, so as long as you get a 3.0 from you ADN you can be considered. Frontier is a GREAT school (ranked #12 in the country) and they are much less "medical model" than many of the other CNM programs. They are a community based program, so you do your academic work online (with 2 short trips to Kentucky) and then you do your clinicals in your own community. In addition to the CNM, they also offer the WHNP and the FNP. I was seriously thinking about going to Frontier, but I was accepted to the CNM program at a university close to home and although I would love to go to Frontier, my husband teaches here and so my tuition would be a lot lower....so for financial reasons, I am not going to Frontier. I start my CNM program (I already have a BSN) in March!
Just as an FYI: Frontier says that you have to have 1 year of experience to apply, but they told me that PCA/CNA experience during nursing school was adequate to apply.
Good luck!
post #954 of 1533
Quote:
Originally Posted by gratefulmama2isaac View Post
Maxmama, what school are you in?
University of Washington
post #955 of 1533
I have a few questions if that is ok! I REALLY want to go back to school. I only went for a year and took general classes. I know that I want to be a nurse but I am nervous about going back to school after so long. So if anyone could answer these questions I would be very thankful!

1. For those of you with kids how many credits are you able to take per semester? Do you find it stressful to balance parenting and going to school?

2. I have heard it can be really competitive and hard to get into nursing programs. Why is that if there is a nursing shortage? Was it hard for you to get into a program?

3. I got good grades in high school and was good at everything except for Math. I have a lot of anxiety associated with it and I don't want it to hold me back. For a nursing degree how many math classes do you have to take?

I just really want to get my degree but don't even know where to start!!! I guess I should start by applying for financial aid and go from there?!
post #956 of 1533
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxton25 View Post
but I am nervous about going back to school after so long.
You can do it!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxton25 View Post
1. For those of you with kids how many credits are you able to take per semester? Do you find it stressful to balance parenting and going to school?
I took 9 last semester, ten this semester, and will probably have 15 next semester; I take some classes online. My school has an excellent preschool/daycare and my older child is old enough to stay home if necessary, or go to a friend's early to get a ride to her school. I am on my own a lot since my spouse travels for work; I don't find it too stressful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxton25 View Post
2. I have heard it can be really competitive and hard to get into nursing programs. Why is that if there is a nursing shortage? Was it hard for you to get into a program?
Along with a nursing shortage, there is a shortage of nursing *instructors,* which leads to limited seats in programs. I hope to get in for next fall; my school has a point system based on classes already taken and the grades for those classes. Whether you get in depends on how many other people are applying that year and what they have taken. Some get in right away; some wait a year or two, but in that case, if you plan to go into a bachelor's program, you can take other courses in the meantime.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxton25 View Post
3. I got good grades in high school and was good at everything except for Math. I have a lot of anxiety associated with it and I don't want it to hold me back. For a nursing degree how many math classes do you have to take?
I really don't think you need to be alarmed about math requirements. From what I've seen, for an associate's degree there is usually only one math class required, either statistics or college algebra (so you might be done already!). If you plan to go into a BSN program, you should check on what they will want; most require Statistics rather than Algebra, IME. Also, if you plan to go into advanced practice nursing, some programs say physics makes one a more competetive candidate; organic chem is required for some master's programs, both of which need or would be helped by algebra/trig/calc. But if you're looking at a basic RN degree to start, you will probably find the math quite manageable (statistics is really easy!).

Good luck!
post #957 of 1533
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxton25 View Post

1. For those of you with kids how many credits are you able to take per semester? Do you find it stressful to balance parenting and going to school?

2. I have heard it can be really competitive and hard to get into nursing programs. Why is that if there is a nursing shortage? Was it hard for you to get into a program?

3. I got good grades in high school and was good at everything except for Math. I have a lot of anxiety associated with it and I don't want it to hold me back. For a nursing degree how many math classes do you have to take?
1) I have always gone full time, around 12-15 credit hours a semester and have done just fine (A's and B's). I don't really find it stressfull overall except around exam times (because I cram...lol). When I was doing my pre-req's I did them both online and in the evenings when my dh was home to watch the kids. That worked out very well for me.

2) Like the above poster said, the nursing shortage affects ALL nurses including those who teach....there isn't enough nursing instructors at all, I know my school struggles to find instructors.

It wasn't hard for me to get accepted because I kept my gpa high, excellent references, etc. It really depends on the school, how they make their selections, how many spots, etc.

I went and talked to my adviser for the nursing department and asked her exactly what I needed to do to get in, she told me, I did it, and got in the first time around. Sooo many people never go to their adviser to find out important information! Make sure you do that NOW.

3) For math I took college algebra and statistics. I too, had a fear of math and started at the bottom with pre-algebra and worked my way up and did very well making A's in both College Algebra and Psych Stat's! In the nursing program the math is not hard....it is just dosage calculations and it just takes time to learn the conversions and just practice. I still wouldn't say I'm good at math and a calculator is my friend Going through college algebra and statistics really built up my confidence. Sometimes it's good to face your fears.

I love nursing school and have been able to do it quite well (all A's and a couple B's) even while homeschooling my 2 girls and working part time. I love that their are so many opportunities in nursing!

Good luck
post #958 of 1533
Thanks so much ladies for all your great info! I REALLY appreciate it! I have been so confused as where to start. So once I apply for financial aid and apply to a school should I talk to an advisor to see what all I need to take for pre-req's and everything?! What classes would you recommend taking online?! All I have under my belt so far is a year of English, a semester of Spanish, a semester of psych, a semester of Sociology, a year of dance/PE, and a few other classes. No math or science though.
post #959 of 1533
1. I had no children in school but I there was a girl in my LVN class who was taking our semester load (14 units) and pre-reqs for the RN program at the same time. She had six children, the youngest being two years. Most of the moms in my LVN and RN program were torn over how little time they spent with their children but they just focused on the fact that (to them) it was well worth it. Many of them were single moms too. I was always in awe of them, I could barely keep my crap together and I had no kids

2. I applied to one LVN school and got in n the first shot. I applied to one LVN-RN bridge program and got in on the first shot. My area has a serious nursing shortage, I don't know how I pulled it off.

3. I took statistics and pre-calc because I was a biology major prior to being a nursing major. I think many programs require algebra or statistics. Then you learn math for drug calculations which really isn't difficult.
post #960 of 1533
I wanted to post this here in hopes that the perfect fit is out there:

Part-time LPN/RN with L&D experience needed for free standing birth center, some nights/weekends included. Resume: 1412 SW 6th, Topeka, KS 66606.

If anyone is interested in this position and has some questions, you can respond here or pm me. I used to work there and can supply you with any information you might need.

Please pass it on to anyone who might be interested! Thanks! Lori
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