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Question Re: Pushing and Hospitals - Page 2

post #21 of 51
With my third baby, I ended up lying on my left side, clinging to the bedrail. One leg was flat on the bed, DH held up the other one. It was a position I did not imagine birthing in :LOL However, my body told me to do it, and it took care of the last bit of cervical lip I had. DD came half an hour later.

I used a squat bar with DS1, but not for the actual birth.
DS2 came so fast all I could do was get on the bed and lay back.
post #22 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsMoe
Because I have no other option but to birth at a hospital...

Why is it every picture, video, documentary etc of women pushing the baby out in hospitals is done flat on her back???

Do hospitals "allow" you other pushing positions?

Does the hospital force you to push in bed?
I think it depends more on your care provider than the hospital. I just had a hospital birth with a midwifery practice. I made it to the hospital with very little time to spare so we didn't have time to discuss whether I could push out of bed or not. It ended up they did want me on the bed (as opposed to the bare floor or toilet) but laying down caused me awful pain and I was screaming that I had to get up so they raised the head of the bed almost vertical for me to hang on and I pushed on my hands and knees. It was MUCH better than pushing lying down. The only bad part about that position is I didn't get to see him come out.
post #23 of 51
My doc let me push however I wanted. I squatted for a while, then was semi-reclining. It just felt good that way, for some reason. They all said, "Just do what you gotta do, Honey!" and it all went really well.
post #24 of 51
My babies have all been c-sections, and I've never pushed so I'm curious...what would they do if someone insisted on pushing in a position they didn't like? Are we talking about a team of nurses holding you down on the bed, or just another stupid fight with "care providers"?
post #25 of 51
I had a CNM help us in the hospital setting. The first baby, I was in the bed with legs only partway open. I refused flat out to be "splayed open" like the nurse wanted. The midwife said as long as she could see, I could do anything I wanted.

The second baby, same midwife, I stood at the end of the bed. She knelt on the floor and caught my ds. He came out in three pushes. Gravity really helps!

Of course, I was not hooked up to anything either time. So there was no need to worry about tubes and wires and such.
post #26 of 51
FWIW, my friend's labor was "augmented" and she had an epidural, yet she used the squat bar successfully. Didn't push the baby out like that, she was semi-sitting with legs held up for that, but she was able to use it.

I don't know how she wasn't scared out of her mind, since the table was about a million feet in the air...
post #27 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by adenlilysmama
The nurses at our hospital are fans of the semi-sitting position... which as Pamamidwife said is not any better than lying flat, and maybe worse since your tailbone can't open. All the hospital beds here have squat bars but I've never seen/heard of anyone actually using one. I know I wanted to use the squat bar with DS but I never thought of it and no one suggested it--it's such an intense time for you and DH, and a nurse may not suggest it if that's not their inclination... yet another reason to have a doula with you! But I do know people who have birthed standing up at our hospital... one doctor saw a midwife catch a baby that way and now she will do it too. I think the nurses/doctors are just scared of the unknown. They are not trained or experienced with anything except flat on back or semi-sitting positions, so they don't feel comfortable with anything else until their eyes are opened!
I used a squat bar to push w/ my first in the hospital. I liked it a lot. The squat bars at the hospital where I had my 2nd were so flimsy and high in the air like PP described, there's no way I'd have ever felt safe using it! My first, though, I ended up pushing the last while in a sitting on the very edge of the bed position. I don't know if that's considered a good position or not, but I was too tired to squat anymore (I pushed for 2.5 hours) and the only other real option was lying down, i guess. My doc had me try all kinds of weird things, btw, from sitting on the toilet to standing holding onto my partner. But I settled on squatting and didn't want to do any of the others for more than 1 push.

Then w/ my 2nd I was on my back w/ an epidural, all the better for the doc to give me an episiotomy.
post #28 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride
My babies have all been c-sections, and I've never pushed so I'm curious...what would they do if someone insisted on pushing in a position they didn't like? Are we talking about a team of nurses holding you down on the bed, or just another stupid fight with "care providers"?
When I had the first 2 in the hospital in 78 and 80 they still used restraints-- I was strapped to the delivery table-- also strapped to the labor bed with the first. although times have changed I think that the new restrains are monitors and epidurals-- sort of the passive restraint system. But I have seen quite a bit of will exerted at some births as well -- so the nurses do gather round and might hold a woman in place and scream in her face and be very harsh and rude and also worrisome -- now push and help your baby, do you want your baby to die then help by doing something-- then they start the 10 count and yell hold it hold it, at this point an aid or nurse may be holding legs or doing fundal pressure or pressing on mom's back-- a while back we had some clients having their 6th and last baby at home(first homebirth) the couple needed interrupters (because they did not speak the same language)for their births-- they asked us to please not yell or hit the mother when she is pushing that everything should be said to the interpreter and then dad would relay the message-- the doctor was screaming in the woman's face and actually hit her on the forehead because she had her eyes closed and she was curled over looking down and the doctor wanted the mom to look at him while she was pushing.
ask questions of your doctor, talk to the nursing staff and remember you can fire a nurse if you need to
post #29 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride
My babies have all been c-sections, and I've never pushed so I'm curious...what would they do if someone insisted on pushing in a position they didn't like? Are we talking about a team of nurses holding you down on the bed, or just another stupid fight with "care providers"?
I think they could physically force you if they felt like it, yes.

My last birth 7 years ago in a small town hospital - I was physically pushed down by a nurse many many times through out my labor. I was sitting up in bed - and she would come and shove me back down. After her doing this many times over and being very nasty - I screamed at her that she was fired and to get the hell out of my room. She left and never came back. God, I was so so upset, and I just know she was a major reason why my BP was skyrocketing.

mwherbs - they strapped you to your bed! OMG!!! Just... WOW!!!! That makes me very very upset to hear that.
post #30 of 51
MrsMoe: The hospital you are gonna birth at "Sais" you can use the squatting bar, or whatever. But trust me, they prefer you in the stranded beetle position.

or at least propped up with your ankles behind your ears.

The nurses there RARELY see an unmendicated labour/birth and dont know how to handle it. Seriously. If you get a clueless nurse, tell her to either get you a nurse that HAS a clue, or just leave.

A friend of mine delivered at that hospital, under the care of the same midwives I saw *same ones that delivered my dd too lol* and the nurse that was on duty that night, broke the bed down, and tried to get my friend to push in the stranded beetle position.

So, just a little FYI, your Doula is gonna have to do some real hard talking to you and your DH for proper pushing positions in that hospital.

*Mom and baby friendly my rear end...*
post #31 of 51
I just wanted you to know that I had a wonderful hospital birth with my DS. I labored at home for a long time and arrived at the hospital at 8 cm. I had a midwife that seemed to instinctively know what I needed or didn't need at the time and was really respectful. I had major concerns about tearing stemming from my first birth, and she did encourage me to push in a variety of positions until we found a few that seemed to work for me and then we switched around between those few. I only had a tear that was slightly more than a skid mark and felt fine a in a week or two. I also didn't have any monitoring other than an occasional stethescope check, and no IV or hep lock. No internal checks except for when I arrived and one that *I* asked for when *I* wanted to know if I was complete. My water broke on its own at about 9.5 cm. I left in 24 hours after birth, and they didn't give me any pitocin after birth. My son was never taken from my room, and I could have refused any of the things I did let happen (ex: vit K drops, bath, etc...). It was fabulous and very empowering.

Yay for crunchy Madison, WI!
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleet76
I just wanted you to know that I had a wonderful hospital birth with my DS.
Mine was pretty good too. It may be a challenge to set up, but it is possible, if you are with the right provider. My provider was a midwifery service that attends you and supervises everything themselves - the labor nurses don't get involved except to support the midwife and follow her directions. I wasn't in the L&D area for long, but the one labor nurse I had was *very* hands off, yielding completely to the midwife. I could tell she didn't like it, but she was following her orders. If you can find a provider like this, I think you can have an empowering hospital birth.

http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=347105
post #33 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pandora114
MrsMoe: The hospital you are gonna birth at "Sais" you can use the squatting bar, or whatever. But trust me, they prefer you in the stranded beetle position.

or at least propped up with your ankles behind your ears.

The nurses there RARELY see an unmendicated labour/birth and dont know how to handle it. Seriously. If you get a clueless nurse, tell her to either get you a nurse that HAS a clue, or just leave.

A friend of mine delivered at that hospital, under the care of the same midwives I saw *same ones that delivered my dd too lol* and the nurse that was on duty that night, broke the bed down, and tried to get my friend to push in the stranded beetle position.

So, just a little FYI, your Doula is gonna have to do some real hard talking to you and your DH for proper pushing positions in that hospital.

*Mom and baby friendly my rear end...*

I've actually heard a lot of really positive feedback in regards to the hospital by not only my doula and my OBGYN, but by 2 other doulas as well! So time will tell.
post #34 of 51
Yeah you're right, I'll ask my friend what the name of the nurse that was there when she delivered *Midwife attended, but she still had a nurse come in and break the bed and told her to lay on her back*

That way if you get her, you know to either edcuate her, or ask for another *if there's another on duty :P Remember where we live here*
post #35 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pandora114
Yeah you're right, I'll ask my friend what the name of the nurse that was there when she delivered *Midwife attended, but she still had a nurse come in and break the bed and told her to lay on her back*

That way if you get her, you know to either edcuate her, or ask for another *if there's another on duty :P Remember where we live here*
Having a baby in the hospital is the entire reason we are hiring a doula. We can't really afford it, but we are finding the money. Between her and my husband, won't have to worry too much.

I know first hand the nurse who is on duty can either be wonderful or make your life miserable. I want to see the nurses as little as possible. :LOL
post #36 of 51
Well I just dropped her an email, and I'll get the nurses name if she remembers, or at least a rough description.

post #37 of 51
This is what my friend said:

Quote:
I haven't a clue, I don't remember being introduced and she was kicked
out the room quite unceremoniously when Andreia finally arrived. I
don't even remember her face, but she was a bottle blond and had red
nail polish (which is really horribly against any hospital policy I've
ever heard of). The nurses on the PP floor were the absolute worst, all
of them, ask her if her OB can let her recover in L&D and be
discharged from there (if she's comfortable with that). If she needs an
LC, Eileen Shay (sp?) is the BEST in the hammer, don't even bother with
the LCs at the Hoe's.

post #38 of 51
So - I take it that L&D nurses operate on the assumption that childbirth sucks, so they should make it as bad as they can? This stuff is horrifying, but I remember one of my sister's nurses being a complete...never mind, I shouldn't say that on MDC. But, our doctor complained afterwards, and she was suspended. She was soooo awful.
post #39 of 51
I think it may be up to the individual doctor. My OB lets women labor and birth in whatever position they want. She said the only caveat is that in a squatting position, she can't control the perineum as well, but if that's how the mom wants to birth, she's all for it. She also likes for the mom to catch their own babies.

I gave birth sitting up (the bed was in the full upright position). The lights were dim, the bed wasn't broken down (ie, no stirrups, etc.) and I directed my own pushing. In fact, I started pushing before the doctor even had her gloves on. She was joking, "Hey, wait for me!" :LOL
post #40 of 51
My doctor said I could give birth standing on my head if I wanted to. Though he did say it probably wouldn't be very productive that way. :LOL I did end up giving birth on my back, and I think it was the bed. Those beds are really high up and it was hard for me to get up and out of it, so I didn't. I wish that I had though.
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