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NT October thread - Page 2

post #21 of 104
Thread Starter 
You can use sour milk in place of buttermilk in any recipe. Also, if you can stomach it, if you drink it plain it has way more beneficial stuff than fresh raw milk - maybe use it to make hot chocolate.
post #22 of 104
I just finished off a very un-NT pumpkin pie. It was delish! I got it from an amish woman over the weekend. I wonder if there is a way to make such a thing more NT friendly.

I tried the Ezekial 4:9 sprouted pasta the other day, and it was not a good thing. My children very politely ate it, and then said "Mama, we really like the other kind of pasta better. Can we have that next time?" It was like eating cardboard! I felt badly for making that for dinner, and told my poor children that we would not have that again! Then I gave the rest of the box to my mom!!
post #23 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by gardenmommy
I just finished off a very un-NT pumpkin pie. It was delish! I got it from an amish woman over the weekend. I wonder if there is a way to make such a thing more NT friendly.
I've made the NT pumpkin pie and it was quite yummy!
post #24 of 104
I thought this was a great little article I just read, and thought I would pass it along! http://www.greenpasture.org/index.php/awe_butter_oil
post #25 of 104
yitlan, I will check out that recipe and see if we like it. I am finally able to get to my books again. I just took down the dropcloths and tape from my latest painting project. my books were stuck underneath all the stuff I removed from that room, but noe I can finally get at it again.

I'm not sure about drinking the sour milk, even with chocolate in it. Interesting side note: I know several dairy farmers who feed their calves soured milk, as they say that the calves do better on it. It always used to turn my stomach when I had to do calf chores, though.
post #26 of 104
tweetybird, I wasn't able to open that page.
post #27 of 104
Sorry, it looks like they changed the site around this morning, it's not working for me either!
post #28 of 104
Thread Starter 
Oh no! I skimmed it last night and found it very intriguing! Hopefully it'll come back or show up somewhere else.

About the sour milk: I forgot to add that you could use it in cooking recipes where you'd normally use milk, like casseroles, soups, etc. Also, I can't hunt it down at the moment, but I think in the last thread there was a link to the WAPF site with an article about what to do with sour milk. There was a recipe for a custard that I made, and it turned out pretty good (except I haven't quite mastered the art of making custard in the oven that doesn't taste like sweetened scrambled eggs :LOL)
post #29 of 104
I made my first pies last Friday for a friends baby welcoming. I made pumpkin and lemon merague (sp?). They turned out awsome. Not NT, but very good. I made a whold spelt pie crust for both and used butter for one and half butter, half tenderflake for the other. I also used half the sugar called for in the pumpkin and added molassas. The pumpkin also had heavy cream instead of evaporated milk. They both were very yummy and I'm making them again to go with our free range turkey for Thanksgiving this weekend.

I just finished a BIG pot of beef stock. YUM! We are having beef barley soup for dinner cause I get so much tender meat from the bones. This time I used organice marrow bones/oxtail/and meaty soup bones. Even after simmer for almost 24 hours the meat is always full of flavor and so tender. Soup after stock making is my favorite dinner. Did I mention I loved my new stock pot? I can make so much at once, it's wonderful.

I'm very impressed with the stock costs too. It costs me around $10 for the organic stock bones and then the vegies. I get enough for a big pot of soup with lots of tender meat, a big pot of chili and 2 more litres for the freezer.
post #30 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by tweetybirds2
Sorry, it looks like they changed the site around this morning, it's not working for me either!
Anyone who wants to read this great article, go to Google, and search for:
"why I'm in awe of butter oil"

Below the first link that pops up is a "Cached" link. Use that link, not the greenpasture.org address. Google has the article for a couple weeks I think.

I saved it, so PM me if you are having trouble finding it.
post #31 of 104
I am going to make stock with some bison bones today, I haven't done this before. I have made chicken stock lots of times.

Should I put in a liver, or some liver if I can cut it frozen?
I haven't with chicken stock because I can't get organic liver yet.

How long should I let it simmer?
I usually put the chicken in the crockpot the night before we eat the soup from the stock. I am sick and didn't feel like going out in the cold last night to get the bones.

What should I put in it along with the bones?
Onion, carrot? Anything else?


Thanks
post #32 of 104
Bison stock is wonderful. Make it like you would the chicken stock with the same vegetables (carrot/onion/celery) and do the same thing to it. I boil my stock in a pot first before transfering it to the crock, that way I can skim all the gunk off of it. Bison stock jells up really well, like jello.

My beef stock turned out sweet. I added the oxtail this time, could that be why? I mean it's a nice sweet.
post #33 of 104
Okay, question.

You know how in the directions for yogurt it says to put it in a dehydrator for the incubation period? I love this idea, it sounds like it would be a reliable heat source. But most of the dehydrators I've seen just have stackable trays, so there is no way you could put a quart jar in there.

So, do any of you know of brands out there that would work to put a jar in it?
I've been wanting a dehydrator anyway.
post #34 of 104

enzyme exhaustion?

I'm re-reading NT, and I'm wondering about enzyme exhaustion. Back in high school biology, IIRC, it said that enzymes were reused -- they were like keys that unlocked or locked together different things. So once they had done their job, they weren't used up, they kept on digesting things. Do they get worn out after a while? Am I misunderstanding?
post #35 of 104
I can do yogurt in my excalibur dehydrator.
post #36 of 104
The Excalibur is supposed to be wonderful and I want one! But it won't happen until we get a bigger kitchen. Try ebay to see if you can get a good deal, as they are quality you must pay for!
post #37 of 104
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brisen
I'm re-reading NT, and I'm wondering about enzyme exhaustion. Back in high school biology, IIRC, it said that enzymes were reused -- they were like keys that unlocked or locked together different things. So once they had done their job, they weren't used up, they kept on digesting things. Do they get worn out after a while? Am I misunderstanding?
enzymes are catalysts in a reaction, and as such are not used up in the reaction, so in that respect you're right. I'll have to check back to see what it says in my texts though. In NT, does it say anything about the enzymes simply getting flushed out of the body or being part of a bacterium rather than the gut itself? Also, cells die all the time, so if the enzyme is in that cell I'm thinking it would go too - I'm totally going off the top of my head here, I'll look into it a little more. I really want to get the book they refer to wrt enzymes and digestion at some point.

Speaking of new books, I finally got my copy of Garden of Eating and LOVE it! Thanks for recommending it so highly toraji! For the Canadians on the list, I would really suggest trying to get someone you know in the US to pick it up for you and send it though. UPS are a bunch of highway robbers - it cost me half as much as the price of the book just for duty and all that other crap! And I'd already prepaid shipping! It's always good to have a reminder of why I don't order from the States - way too friggin' expensive.
post #38 of 104
HerthElde, I haven't noticed any references to enzymes being flushed out with food or being part of the bacteria (though that makes sense, but then I thought the references to enzyme exhaustion was to enzymes that our bodies produced) -- it just said that food that was cooked drew heavily on the body's enzymes and if you ate too much cooked food, your resources could be depleted. I should go back and look at it again.

And about ordering from the States -- I have been trying to find a place to buy a grain mill from Canada, and it just isn't happening. There is a town nearby that has a store with such things, but they are so pricey, and not really what I'm looking for anyway. What I really want is a Bosch mixer with Family Grain Mill attachments, but I don't think it will happen any time soon.
post #39 of 104
I asked a question (I think in last month's thread) about some butter that I made that didn't work out... I make it in the blender, and it seemed to separate, but not really completely -- the grains looked smaller than usual, and they didn't hold together. I have made butter successfully a couple of times since then, and I think I figured out the problem -- I overblended it. At first, I wasn't leaving the cream out at room temp to culture, and it took a while in the blender for the butter to separate. The time that didn't work, I had left the cream out and it smelled cultured. This time again I left the cream out for about 7 hours, and the butter separated really quickly. I turned on the blender for the first batch and went to scrub out a pot; when I checked on it, it had already separated and was on the way to being overblended. The buttermilk didn't separate really well and the butter was light and whipped in texture. On the second batch, I stood right there and it separated really quickly, and the butter was nice and firm and separated easily. So, I think that was the problem. It is nice that leaving it out and culturing it makes the butter making even easier. I also find that when I don't leave the cream out, the cream will "whip" in the blender and sit stiff up above the blades, so I have to keep stopping it, stirring it down, starting it up... etc. or shake the blender around to try and knock it down. That doesn't seem to happen with the cultured cream.
post #40 of 104
yeah!!! I love making butter. Sometimes I culture and sometimes I don't. It does definitely whip up better at room temperature and not cold. I do mine in the blender too.

As for a mill..this isn't in Canada but you might be able to email the gal and see if she can suggest anything. www.urbanhomemaker.com
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