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Sodium Ascorbate - Page 24

post #461 of 564
I guess any ascorbate you can get your hands on for now , while you order Sodium ascorbate. I usually get from Bronson labs, maybe they could espress ship or something.
My dh also had chicken pox as an adult, got it from dd, he was 30 yrs old and was really sick for a while there. wish I'd known about SA back then.
wishing you dh well and soon!!!!!
have you looked into homeopathics?
post #462 of 564
Thanks Tanya! yes, I just need to stick with what works for my family for right now, too. It is overwhelming at times.

I have used calcium ascorbate, labeled as buffered vitamin C also, before I knew about sodium ascorbate. I would just use whatever you have on hand, until you can get the other.

Hope he feels better soon!
post #463 of 564
Ex Libris -
I am sorry to hear about your oxalate sensitivity! I take regular SA, close to 4g/day, generally to just under bowel tolerance because it seems to keep me so healthy! I had cut back, but then I was reading Levy's book and I got into it again. I would like to follow up on the oxalate risk to myself, do you have some literature recommendations?
post #464 of 564
Hi wallacesmum,
I suggest that you read around on the Trying Low Oxalates Yahoo group. Susan Owen started the discussion, and she's a researcher with the Autism Research Institute and has been working on oxalates for many years now. You can search the forum for Susan's posts on the vitamin C issue; she posts relevant articles from PubMed to support what she's saying. Or, you could search PubMed yourself for how oxalates can convert to Vitamin C.

Good luck!

Kelly

Quote:
Originally Posted by wallacesmum View Post
Ex Libris -
I am sorry to hear about your oxalate sensitivity! I take regular SA, close to 4g/day, generally to just under bowel tolerance because it seems to keep me so healthy! I had cut back, but then I was reading Levy's book and I got into it again. I would like to follow up on the oxalate risk to myself, do you have some literature recommendations?
post #465 of 564
Levy says the data is up in the air - vit. c seems to help with kidney stones in some situations, but when it is in combination with other factors that cause a propensity for calcium oxalates to form, then it is an issue.

The calcium forms are more likely to cause this trouble, as well as a high-oxalate intake.

It sounds like your body was a bit of a perfect storm for oxalate damage - that really sucks! I hope you find it to be reversible.

I am going to continue to look into this.
post #466 of 564
Please post back if you find anything, if you have time to share. I am interested to know also. Thanks!
post #467 of 564
Here are some articles on the Vitamin C / Oxalate connection. You can find them in PubMed using the reference numbers. You can find a lot more information at this Yahoo group. Join the group and then do an advanced search of "Susan Owens" as the author (she runs the forum) and "Vitamin C" in the subject.

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group..._Low_Oxalates/


1. Chest. 2000 Aug;118(2):561-3.[] Links

Acute renal failure, oxalosis, and vitamin C supplementation: a case report and review of the literature.

Mashour S,
Turner JF Jr,
Merrell R.

PMID: 10936161 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


2. J Am Soc Nephrol. 1996 Nov;7(11):2320-6. Links

Secondary oxalosis: a cause of delayed recovery of renal function in the
setting of acute renal failure.

Alkhunaizi AM,
Chan L.

PMID: 8959621 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


3. Kidney Int. 2006 Nov;70(10):1672.[] Links

Secondary oxalosis due to excess vitamin C intake.

Nasr SH,
Kashtanova Y,
Levchuk V,
Markowitz GS.

PMID: 17080154 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


4. Eur J Clin Invest. 1998 Sep;28(9):695-700.[] Links

Relative hyperoxaluria, crystalluria and haematuria after megadose
ingestion of vitamin C.

Auer BL,
Auer D,
Rodgers AL.

PMID: 9767367 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


5. Nephron. 1989;51(4):536-9. Related Articles, Links

Effect of vitamin C supplementation on renal oxalate deposits in
five-sixths nephrectomized rats.

Ono K, Ono H, Ono T, Kikawa K, Oh Y.

Ono Geka Clinic, Fukuoka, Japan.

PMID: 2739830 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



6. Am J Kidney Dis. 1986 Dec;8(6):450-4. Related Articles, Links

Bone oxalate in a long-term hemodialysis patient who ingested high
doses of vitamin C.

Ott SM, Andress DL, Sherrard DJ.

PMID: 3812476 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



7. Klin Wochenschr. 1987 Jan 15;65(2):97-100. Related Articles, Links

Excessive myocardial calcinosis in a chronic hemodialyzed patient.

Zazgornik J, Balcke P, Rokitansky A, Schmidt P, Kopsa H, Minar E,
Graninger W.

PMID: 3560789 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



8. Clin Nephrol. 1986 Nov;26(5):239-43. Related Articles, Links

Secondary hyperoxalemia caused by vitamin C supplementation in regular
hemodialysis patients.

Ono K.

PMID: 3802587 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
post #468 of 564
subbing
post #469 of 564
Subbing too, I will TRY my hardest to read this.whole.thread.
post #470 of 564
How much emergen-C should I give my 3 1/2 year old & my 2 year old?? Half a packet? One?
post #471 of 564
I read most of the thread (skimmed a lot honestly). I was sort of surprised to read that sodium ascorbate is difficult for many of you to find. The vitamin C tablets my grocery store sells (Publix Chewable) are sodium ascorbate as the first (and main) ingredient. They are very inexpensive too. Sure, they have a couple fillers (like sugar for instance so it is chewable and tastes decent) but I can live with it since it is such a small amount.
post #472 of 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momtezuma Tuatara View Post
If I said that, put a link up please, because that is not what I meant to say, or meant to have it interpretted.

The iron balance is something that's a very fine balance. If you do a google search using Iron + infection, you will see that not enough iron, and you are susceptible to infection, and too much, and as you say, bacteria can have a field day.

Except diphtheria. Diptheria toxin cannot make mayhem until the iron is depleted, so there are "exceptions" to the rule. I suspect the same may also apply to other bacteria which are "operated" by a virus called bacteriophages, which switch on toxin producing genes as well, but I can't find much on the others.


I guess it depends on the person. This year is the first year I've missed three periods, so had the gaps stretch out, and its the first year where I've finally lost the tag of chronic anaemia.

If there is anything bacterial around, I'm a moving target, but then, with my immune system, that's probably not surprising.

Yes, I agree with that. And another reason not to use formula which has a much higher protein index than breastmilk, and that feeds the badies too.

Do you have an updated map of selenium deficiency in USA? This is the only one I could find, and its out of date. If you know where there is a newer one, can you post it?

http://www.saanendoah.com/map1.html

Yeah, but I couldn't eat enough mustard to do me much good.

All our soils are deficient so I take 150 mcgs a day, when I can't get brazil nuts. Ones that are designed for our soil deficiencies, not yours...If you've read the nutrition/immunology thread, you will know that I hammer minerals

Yes, but it might not just be yeast, but also some of the other anaerobes, and lack of sulphur...
Where does that come from? It took my midwife three contractions with a brand new pair of scissor, which were blunted to cut through the leather than was my amniotic sac with the last labour? Yes, I bled more, but that was from the damage they did in my uterus in the first birth.

That is pretty stupid really, because vitamin C is the base foundation of glucosamine absorption and collagen, and skin protection. Without vitamin C, none of those three things will have good strength. Therefore, for the natural birth people to suggest that, flies in the face of all the known biochemistry that goes along with vitamin C.

:
I have ascorbic acid which is yucky to taste. So have added the same amount of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) as vitamin c & when the water stops fizzing, drink it down easily. Thanks to everyone for this thread!
post #473 of 564
I haven't been able to find anything to figure out how to know whether one is susceptible to oxalate build-up, except that anyone with renal problems should probably avoid SA or find a medical professional to work with. I do notice that a lot of the literature pointing to oxalate damage from Vit. C references ascorbic acid, not SA, and there is always some background that is not complete (how could one possibly assess a comprehensive background in the ER with a new admit who is under stress?).

So, one thing I have been looking at is the way SA works in the body. One of it's most powerful characteristics is that it is an antioxidant, so adding lots of antioxidant whole foods and reducing SA intake might be one way of reducing exposure for those concerned.
post #474 of 564
I don't think they distinguish between SA and ascorbic acid in the medical literature -- ascorbic acid just means vitamin C. I have heard that people with yeast overgrowth are susceptible to oxalate buildup.
post #475 of 564
I agree that they don't distinguish, and I have heard that even Klenner was sloppy about this in his writing. However, many people that I know who take vit. c don't know about SA, and many hfs don't carry it. Therefore, I don't think it is safe to assume that an admit was taking one or the other, if the lit doesn't specify. I don't know that it would be a factor either way with oxalates, though.
post #476 of 564
Awesome thread I have read every page!
MT are you still around??

I have a couple questions if anyone is still following this thread...

*When I go to buy some SA, will it have citrus bioflavonoids in it already, or do I need to buy those seperate aswell?

*Which form of SA is best, tablet, liquid or powder?

*Should we be taking SA throughout the day, or just once in the morning and once at night is ok? -Because it becomes inactive in the body after 30 minutes, so it won't all get absorbed if you take a large amount all in one go?

*Does heat really damage SA? This thread said it does, but then the person who made that claim went on to say they mix it with HOT WATER...so Im unsure?
post #477 of 564
MT was banned.

I don't know of any SA brands that have bioflavonoids added, so yes, those would be a separate supplement.

There are only powder or capsule versions of SA, and all are equal as far as I know.

I would take throughout the day in times of illness to reach bowel tolerance, otherwise if you have a health issue that SA keeps at bay 2-3x day is sufficient. You are right all one dosage will not get absorbed (thus the bowel reactions from unabsorbed SA).

Yes heat damages vitamin C.
post #478 of 564
Ahhh this thread is like a walk down memory lane.... I remember when I still felt it was safe to consume heaps of vitamin supplements made in China....

Those were the days.
post #479 of 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post
MT was banned.

I don't know of any SA brands that have bioflavonoids added, so yes, those would be a separate supplement.

There are only powder or capsule versions of SA, and all are equal as far as I know.

I would take throughout the day in times of illness to reach bowel tolerance, otherwise if you have a health issue that SA keeps at bay 2-3x day is sufficient. You are right all one dosage will not get absorbed (thus the bowel reactions from unabsorbed SA).

Yes heat damages vitamin C.
Why was MT banned?
post #480 of 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post
MT was banned.

I don't know of any SA brands that have bioflavonoids added, so yes, those would be a separate supplement.

There are only powder or capsule versions of SA, and all are equal as far as I know.

I would take throughout the day in times of illness to reach bowel tolerance, otherwise if you have a health issue that SA keeps at bay 2-3x day is sufficient. You are right all one dosage will not get absorbed (thus the bowel reactions from unabsorbed SA).

Yes heat damages vitamin C.
Oh ok, thanks for replying. When people say about "bowel tolerance", what's the symptom of this, diarhea?

I'm a bit concerned about what a previous poster said about Vitamin C turning into "oxolates"? in the body, which are toxic or something? I will try to look into this further before taking it as a supplement I think. IF anyone knows anything please advise.
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