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Anyone unschooling? - Page 3

post #41 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jen123
We unschooled for a year. Gave it a shot. I thought it led to permissive parenting and my kids asked every day "what are we going to do today ?".
My kid asks that many days, too, although it's all on the calendar and she could just check... but she's not so with-it in the mornings. I don't object to the question, though, and when my daughter was little it was definitely good to give her an overview of all of the things we had scheduled. I'm just curious as to why it was a problem for you...

Dar
post #42 of 164
I was wondering that too Dar. My kids definately asked that when they were little. I would just answer them. "We are going to visit Shawn this afternoon." or "We can go to the store and the park." or "We can watch movies" whatever. Sometimes the answer was "I don't know. What do you want to do?"
post #43 of 164
I don't mind the asking either My 3 y/o never asks, he just does what he wants :LOL My 7 y/o asks sometimes. Or more to the point she asks if we're going somewhere today. The answer often dictates whether she bothers to get dressed
post #44 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShannonCC
Or more to the point she asks if we're going somewhere today. The answer often dictates whether she bothers to get dressed

That's a girl I could get along with I am just the same way!
post #45 of 164
Sometimes, about 30 minutes before bedtime, usually after having a really busy day, my 4yo asks, "So, what are we going to do today?" :LOL

But seriously, when he asks, I often find that he already has an ideal answer formed in his head. It's almost like he wants me to ask him what HE wants to do. If it's just one of those blah days, I might strew a little. Maybe I'll leave the tub of pattern blocks out or get out some puzzle he hasn't seen in a long time. Or maybe we'll just go outside. Today, when we were outside, they were bugging me to basically entertain them, which is not usual, but it happens. I quietly got out a few hula hoops and just tossed them in the grass. Then, I tiptoed around the corner. They did all kinds of weird things with the hoops.

Also, sometimes if we've done lots of structured things, it seems like they forget how to amuse themselves so much. That sort of self-corrects itself over time, especially if I do the quiet strewing.
post #46 of 164
Another unschooling family here! I have 4 kids ds 13, ds 9, ds 6, and dd 2. I'll post more about their interests when I have more time!

Katie
post #47 of 164
It wasn't the asking of the question "what are we going to do today ?" it was the lack of answer on my part. My kids were constantly bored. I'd suggest , I'd offer , I'd 'strew' their path..... It just wasn't working for us. We had a lot of dischord as a family.

Things work better for us when I say "we're doing math today. How do you want to do it ?" Then the kids choose multiplication , chalk , flash cards , work books , computer games , etc.... With the main goal being exploring math concepts , we don't necessarily have to retain anything. No pressure. No tests.

Somehow , despite all I learned about unschooling , somewhere down the line when it came to application , I had confused unschooling with laziness and permissiveness.

I 'see' other moms unschooling (online) and I think "that is soooo cool if it works for you and yours".
post #48 of 164
Me, too.
post #49 of 164
Thread Starter 
It's really fun to see so many other unschooling families here

Where I live, we are seen as very weird for home educating, never mind unschooling. :LOL
post #50 of 164
We're an unschooling family with a 6 3/4 year old and a 4 1/4 year old. (they insist on having those "quarters" being noted, LOL) I proudly and strongly claim the title "unschoolers" despite the fact that I don't let them watch TOO much TV or play on the computer TOO much and we have a number of classes (sports, mostly) & events that we go to each week and I buy TONS of books, activities, games and even workbooks and small amounts of curriculum (used and new) for our bookshelves. No learning is forced whatsoever but it's available everywhere in our lives.
post #51 of 164
We are Waldorf inspired unschoolers. Leaning more toward the unschooler approach as I so strongly believe in child lead learning. The more I learn about unschooling the more I claim the title. While it seems we have been living the philosophy we are new to learning about unschooling and are currently reading everything by Holt. That said, we embrace many of the Waldorf ideals (natural toys, limitted/no TV, reverence for nature) - and we reject some of Waldorf ideas too . I just don't like rules.

Anyway, I have a 5 yr old ds who loves:
Carpentry
Baking
Crafts
Working outdoors
Rocks
Books of all kinds (read to him and to look at)
Geography - looking at maps and asking about a country, city, ocean of his choice
Playing guitar
Climbing trees
Drawing
Sports - especially soccer, baseball and basketball

and I have a 6 month old dd who loves:
Squealing at her brother, naps, and suckling nippy upon request
post #52 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by eternal_grace
This thread is not about labels but about finding other unschoolers (=anyone who can identify with the principles).
I'm calling myself an unschooler in training. My dd is only 4.5 but we have always planned to homeschool and now I'm seeing unschooling as the way we'll go.

What I have read about unschooling has already changed my life and helped me to guide my Dd. I mean, in the past I would have put reading materials in front of her. Now I'm just paying attention to her interests and helping her follow up on them, like she's very into orgami right now.
post #53 of 164
Mom to unschooling girl here. Sophia is nearly 7. She has many interests, some full-fledged immersions and some just skimming the surface. Here are a few:

-Africa (especially jungles and animals in jungle habitats), including language, food and music

-Pokemon (this is a new one and she is fully immersed! She has created her own Pokemon cards and characters, including Energy cards to match the abilities she assigns to them. We're looking for more movies and games and of course, her card collection is growing! We play the card game nearly every evening.)

-piano (We are looking at brochures right now and interviewing teachers/tutors)

-Polly Pocket and Playmobil are always all over our apartment. They have little villages set up so they can travel and visit each other in different rooms

-winter sports (patiently awaiting snow so we can start learning how to ski and snowboard)

-parties (she likes to plan them and create games and themes and of course, the menu)

-Garfield (we finally got the old cartoon series on DVD! She adores the corny jokes!)

She is a confident, interesting and interested person. Unschooling definitely works for us!

Edited to add: Forgot to mention another.
-construction. She has been asking a lot of in-depth questions about how buildings are constructed and how cities are planned.
post #54 of 164
What exactly do you mean by unschooling. I am not familiar with this.
Would someone be so kind as to tell me about it please?
post #55 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by frowningfrog
What exactly do you mean by unschooling. I am not familiar with this.
Would someone be so kind as to tell me about it please?

Up at the top of the screen here you will see a search button. If you search "unschooling" you will get several threads on the subject.

Unschooling can be defined differently by different people, but it's generally understood as a living is learning lifestyle and approach to education. Unschooling families do not have mandatory lessons, assignments, grades, or a "school" schedule. The children are in control of their own learning, and they decide what they want to be learning about or not. They are free to read a book or not read it, they are free to color or build with Legos or play a game or bake a cake or whatever.

Unschoolers see life as educational without forcing a child to do xyz. Many people worry about college or the workforce later for unschoolers, but it isn't a problem. Unschoolers go on to college and employment just fine.
post #56 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolnMa

Many people worry about college or the workforce later for unschoolers, but it isn't a problem. Unschoolers go on to college and employment just fine.
Do you have any research to support this? I would like to know how this is possible without any instruction in math, science, social studies, etc. It sounds like you would be at an extreme disadvantage.

Children do not always make the best decisions for themselves. Some, esp. those who struggle in reading, would choose never to read. This to me, is not helping a child have all doors open to them later.

XOXO
Beth
post #57 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolnMa

Unschooling can be defined differently by different people, but...
Thanks for that definition. It helps even some of us who have been studying it.

I still am contemplating certain issues related to unschooling such as the fact that I'm unwilling to buy a TV. I gave up that addiction years ago and won't invite it back into my life. Also, sugar is an addiction in my extended family the way heroin would be for some people. It killed my dad and has made nearly everyone obese and put me on medication to control my insulin, so I gave that up and can't have it in the house. These aren't things I'm going to bring back into my life with or without kids, so I guess I won't be a radical homeschooler because of that, which I don't mind, but I like to know that I do have some things in common with a particular group so that I can share and learn.
post #58 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by BethSLP
Children do not always make the best decisions for themselves. Some, esp. those who struggle in reading, would choose never to read. This to me, is not helping a child have all doors open to them later.
I think those children wouldn't choose to learn to read in the difficult school setting that has been provided to them. But, I highly doubt that a person, given relaxed opportunties, is going to go into adulthood refusing to learn to read. If they did, then why would they need it at all? My feeling is that if they need it, they'll be motivated to learn it, given the right atmosphere.
post #59 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubyWild
I think those children wouldn't choose to learn to read in the difficult school setting that has been provided to them. But, I highly doubt that a person, given relaxed opportunties, is going to go into adulthood refusing to learn to read. If they did, then why would they need it at all? My feeling is that if they need it, they'll be motivated to learn it, given the right atmosphere.
Are you actually insinuating that some people don't need to learn to read?

I have no words to answer.

XOXO
Beth
post #60 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by BethSLP
Do you have any research to support this?
Research? No. Enough info to believe it's accurate? Yes. You might want to check out Peter Kowalke's website a bit. He is a grown up unschooler and college student (perhaps he has graduated now? I dunno.) Sandra Dodd's website, www.sandradodd.com I think, might be helpful too. I believe her children have been employed without issue. (Her older boys at least.) I have personally had many discussions with people on line about unschoolers heading off to college (often much earlier than schooled children) and work. My own unschoolers will be going to college around 16 or so.

Quote:
I would like to know how this is possible without any instruction in math, science, social studies, etc. It sounds like you would be at an extreme disadvantage.
Unschooling doesn't mean there is no instruction. It just means that the instruction is wanted and sought out by the child rather than forced and decided for the child. No disadvantage whatsoever. Unschoolers enjoy learning and seek out the info they want and need.

Quote:
Children do not always make the best decisions for themselves.
Right. Adults don't always make the best decisions for themselves either. Unschoolers are not left alone in the world to fend entirely for themselves without any parental anything. They have involved parents who are there to help them. Mistakes are a glorious opportunity to learn new things. I tend to embrace them.
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