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Classical Moms...watcha up to? - Page 3

post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
Unabridged?!? What version is it? I haven't been able to find *any* of the Narnia books unabridged at the library or in the library's database...
My local library doesn't have the unbridged version that I've seen, but when I was at Borders last night, they had unabridged The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe ($28), and I think the boxed set ($75) was unabridged as well. I don't remember which, if any, of the other ones they had on CD or if they were abridged or not.
post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by UlrikeDG
My local library doesn't have the unbridged version that I've seen, but when I was at Borders last night, they had unabridged The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe ($28), and I think the boxed set ($75) was unabridged as well. I don't remember which, if any, of the other ones they had on CD or if they were abridged or not.
Yeah, I never buy those things they're *sooo* expensive!
post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
Yeah, I never buy those things they're *sooo* expensive!
It depends on which ones. Some, like Narnia & Harry Potter, I know my son would listen to over and over. He's checked out Harry Potter from the library multiple times, limited only by the fact that sometimes other people have them out. He's got the Narnia radio dramas on CD, and listened to those until he had them practically memorized. They're not in our budget right now, but I wouldn't hesitate to buy either of them if we had the money.
post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by UlrikeDG
It depends on which ones. Some, like Narnia & Harry Potter, I know my son would listen to over and over. He's checked out Harry Potter from the library multiple times, limited only by the fact that sometimes other people have them out. He's got the Narnia radio dramas on CD, and listened to those until he had them practically memorized. They're not in our budget right now, but I wouldn't hesitate to buy either of them if we had the money.
Oh, don't get me wrong, if I had the cash I wouldn't hesitate to purchase all kinds of audiobooks... but I don't, so I don't even look through them unless they're on a clearance rack somewhere. I did get several audiobooks last year at one of those "Fill-A-Bag" booksales. None of them were kid's books, and only two of them are likely to be listened to more than once (Shadow of the Giant and The Crystal City by Orson Scott Card), but they were there and practically free! I mean, fill a bag with anything under the pavillion for $5, how could I possibly have let those go?!
post #45 of 48
We are not hard and fast classical hsers, but we are currently listening to Catherine, Called Birdy on tape while we knit. It's by Karen Cushman, and is about a young noble British girl in the middle ages. We've done Matilda Bone and The Midwife's Apprentice as well. All borrowed through inter-library loan.

We also had a movie marathon of fiction set in this period. After my 13 yr old had oral surgery recently, we set up camp in my bed with Princess Bride, Robin Hood (the Kevin Costner one- and we roared together when Costner, a Christian returned from the Crusades, asked whether he had wronged someone in a 'former life'. Yeah, reincarnation was a major Christian belief. lol I am so glad she got it), & Monty Python and The Holy Grail.

Would Susan Wise Bauer pull her hair out over this curriculum?

Bwahahahahaha.
post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Baudelaire
Well, lemme see...

As part of our Ancient Greece study right now, we're reading Rosemary Sutcliffe's Black Ships Before Troy and are going to be watching a video of Oedipus Rex this week sometime.

Your kids are young, but my 13 (then 12) yr old daughter and I watched the Katherin Hepburn Women of Troy movie after we read it, and my god, what a powerful movie. It's 'slow' for younger kids, but for tender young teens, it shows what war did to these women.

When you get further along, do not miss Sutcliffe's book The Bronze Bow (Ancient Romans in Jerusalem in the time of Jesus). Wonderful, imo.
post #47 of 48


Just thought I'd revive this thread. What's new?
post #48 of 48
I've been reading about Latin Classical Ed, including the first 3 chapters of Mungo's how-to book. I've been thinking about Multum non Multa (not many things, but much) quite a bit. I've also been reading about Marva Collins. And Waldorf. Weird combo.

I decided to add in Minimus Latin, except that someone bought all the cheap, used copies on Amazon in the 3 days from the time I started thinking about it until I was ready to buy. Some other people must be reading the same stuff I am. I also got a book on teaching English grammar through Latin.

I have actually found most of our curriculum (we moved this past fall). So we can start French for younger dd, as she requested.

We have fought the war of 1812. We are discussing Simon Bolivar, and about to start learning about the Cry of Dolores in SOTW.

For math I've been throwing Singapore at older dd, as well as issues of Gnarly math. I'd like to get back to doing Challenge Math, but that's something we have to work through together, and I haven't had time lately (today the plumber's coming, tomorrow a carpenter, etc. etc.).

We've been doing Tuesday Teatimes as per Bravewriter.

And I've obviously developed a passion for including links in my posts, but that's another topic....
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