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Tetanus? - Page 2

post #21 of 47
From my files... March 26, 2004:

http://interestalert.com/brand/sitei...ter=Healthcare


Don't know if the link is still valid though...
Quote:
Many Unprotected Against Tetanus Risks From Home, Garden and Yard Activities
- 80% of Gardeners Receive Tetanus-prone Injuries Each Year, 40% Report Being Unimmunized - WASHINGTON - PRNewswire - March 26
WASHINGTON, March 26 /PRNewswire/ -- As the arrival of spring ushers in this year's gardening season, a new survey shows that many gardeners are unaware of their increased risk for tetanus, a potentially fatal infectious disease caused by bacteria found in dirt, potting soil and manure. The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID)/National Coalition for Adult Immunization (NCAI) and the National Gardening Association (NGA) are working together to spread the news about outdoor tetanus risks and encourage routine tetanus and diphtheria (Td) immunization during the NGA's National Garden Month in April.

Results of a national consumer survey conducted by the NGA point to a general lack of preparedness among people working around their home, garden or yard, with at least 40% of respondents reporting that they are unprotected against tetanus. This is despite the fact that more than twice as many respondents admit receiving injuries in the last year that put them at direct risk for contracting the disease.

"The bacteria that cause tetanus are widespread in the environment and can potentially prove fatal," says home improvement expert Bob Vila, who has joined NFID/NCAI to encourage routine tetanus immunization. "Even I run the risk of tetanus exposure from everyday gardening and landscaping activities, just like the folks in 84 million households across America who participate in do-it-yourself lawn and garden activities. Fortunately, I've had my Td booster shot, which protects against two diseases, tetanus and diphtheria."

According to NFID/NCAI, many people may not realize that their childhood vaccine series for tetanus and diphtheria doesn't protect them throughout their entire life. For adolescents and adults, one vaccine protects against both infections since both require a booster every 10 years. Tetanus is widely present in the environment and can enter the body through any simple wound -- not just from stepping on a rusty nail. Diphtheria is a contagious disease that is still common in 87 countries and can have a devastating effect if it were to spread among a population with a waning level of immunity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that all adults and adolescents protect themselves before exposure occurs by keeping their tetanus and diphtheria immunization up to date.

"Tetanus is rare in the U.S. today, but it's difficult to tell when you may be exposed and the potential consequences can be devastating," says NFID President Susan Rehm, MD. "Because you can never tell when you might be exposed to tetanus, it is important for all healthy adolescents and adults to protect themselves against the disease with a booster shot, every 10 years."

Other key findings about the public's knowledge of risk and protection against tetanus raised by the 2004 National Gardening Association survey include:

Most respondents don't know where tetanus comes from: * 57% of respondents did not know tetanus bacteria are commonly found in soil, dirt and manure. According to the CDC, 31% of tetanus injuries occur in the yard/garden/farm and an additional 23% occur around other outdoor locations.(1) * Only 35% of respondents recognize that wounds caused by animal or insect bites are potential sources of tetanus infection, despite the commonality of these injuries. A majority of gardeners report tetanus-prone injuries: * 80% of survey respondents reported some type of tetanus-prone injury while working around the home, garden or yard; but 40% report they have not had a tetanus shot in the last 10 years. Few recognize increased tetanus risk for those over 60 years of age: * 86% of respondents did not know that seniors are at an increased risk for tetanus infection compared to children. According to the CDC, 70% of adults 70 years of age and older lack protection against tetanus and diphtheria. Further, at least 40% of those aged 60 years or older remain unprotected against both diseases,(2) and many may never have received a childhood vaccination, which was introduced in the late 1940s.

In the survey, gardening fans report somewhat higher tetanus immunization rates (60%) than the general public; CDC's analysis of more than 18,000 blood samples from the U.S. public show that 53% of people aged 20 years and older are not adequately protected against tetanus and diphtheria.
So that means .. what.. about 150 million USA people are not immune.

So where are all the tetanus cases then?
Quote:

Now in its second year, the NFID/NCAI's public education campaign about tetanus and diphtheria risks and prevention uses the theme Power of 10(SM) to focus on the importance of staying up to date with the booster immunization for both diseases required every 10 years. This year's efforts include TV and radio public service announcements featuring campaign spokesperson Bob Vila, information on gardening-related tetanus risks, a self-quiz on the NFID Web site and a pamphlet to help people assess their own risk and immunization status. For more information about the Power of 10 campaign, tetanus and diphtheria, or to take the Power of 10 quiz, visit the NFID Web site at http://www.nfid.org/.

Tetanus and Diphtheria Prevention

Both tetanus and diphtheria can be very difficult to diagnose, are especially complicated to treat and can be fatal. Contracting a tetanus or diphtheria infection does not provide immunity against future infections, underscoring the importance of routine boosters.

The CDC recommends that everyone have a primary vaccination series against tetanus and diphtheria, and maintain life-long protection. Vaccine protection for tetanus and diphtheria must be "boosted" every 10 years, which is done with a combined vaccine known as "Td." Since the late 1940s, U.S. children have received initial protection with a combined vaccine against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Some adults over 60 years of age may never have had this series. In such cases, the Td vaccine can also be used to provide primary immunization as a three-shot series for adults. Maintaining up-to-date immunity with a Td booster keeps the disease from recurring among the general domestic population and protects people who travel to countries where the risk of tetanus and diphtheria exposure can be high.

NFID/NCAI

Founded in 1973, NFID is a non-profit organization dedicated to public and professional educational programs about and in support of research into the causes, treatment and prevention of infectious diseases. NCAI is a network of more than 140 organizations dedicated to promoting adult immunization primarily through educational and motivational activities. The coalition was formed in 1988 to make the most efficient use of public and private resources to achieve national goals in adult immunization. The Power of 10 campaign was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant to NFID from Aventis Pasteur.

(1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tetanus Surveillance, United States, 1998-2000. MMWR; 2003:52 (No. SS-3): 1-12 (2) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis: Recommendations for Vaccine Use and Other Preventive Measures: Recommendations of the Immunizations Practices Advisory Committee (ACIP). MMWR; 1991:40 (No. RR-10): 1-28. Contacts: Ian Leggat, ileggat@cooneywaters.com Ulysee Huling, uhuling@cooneywaters.com

National Coalition for Adult Immunization

National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID);

Web site: http://www.nfid.org/

I have a pile more, but its 1.30 a.m....
post #22 of 47
The first is that Australia recently did a study the results of which were published in the New Zealand Doctor 18, March 1993, pg 23. This was the first time a study like this had ever been done..., to see what the antibody levels were in people 10 years after their last booster. Here is what the medical article said:
Quote:
Too many tetanus shots

Some people having tetanus boosters already have antibody levels more than 8,000 times (eight thousand) the protective leven needed, suggesting Australia's regime of a booster every 10 years is in need of a change. Community physicians say Australia should adopt the UK regime which advises after five doses, further boosters are unnecessary.
So lets look at this titre thing. Way back in the 80's there was a study done in the Scandinavian J Infect Dis 1983: 15;303 -306, which looked at soldiers who had been given heaps of tetanus vaccine. Their antibody levels were way too high as well, and what they discovered was that "repeated exposure to an antigen, or an overdose of antigen, will not continually enhance the immune response and may lead to inhibition or tolerance at either T or B cells level.. in addition, a possible feedback effect stimulated by the high level of toxoid antibodies may suppress, as Stevens and Saxon have illustrated, the production of more antibodies at a later date"

What are the implications of this?

It came out loud and clear in The Journal of Family Practice, 1997, Vol 44, No 3, pg 299 - 303 when a 29 year old man was admitted with severe generalised tetanus despite having had a primary series and two booster injections. And his levels were only 100 times that considered protective, not 8,000 times as per the Australian study!!!.

Now, if you look at the New Zealand scene, where it was pointed out in the New Zealand Medical Journal (24th November 1994)that most people over 35 are unlikely to have had a vaccine, since it was only inroduced in 1960, then you have to ask yourself why every over-40 year old, isn't dropping dead with tetanus. In 1987 a serum survey showed that just over 50% of the 60-65 group had immunity to tetanus. 83% of the 20-29 year olds, 64% of the 30 -35 year olds. And the stats aren't that much better today. I understand they are even lower for the USA than for here. So where did the people with immunity get it from? Many were not vaccinated...see later...

Now, if you have a look at Tetanus in America, one of the most interesting articles is a 1969 one from the New England Medical Journal, Volume 280, Number 11, March 13. And on pages 570 there is a really interesting decline graph for mortality rates, which shows that the mortality (death) rate plummetted dramatically from 64/100,000 in 1900to 8/100,000. in 1940. By 1950, with most mothers still unvaccinated, it was 4.5/100,000.

Not that Tetanus was ever a very common cause of death before hand anyway, in relation to all the other things that historically could do you in. Marasmus was a much more common killer of children than neonatal tetanus ever was... for instance.

They say that it may have been the use of anti-toxin from 1923, but I know far too much about antitoxin to believe that!!! Antitoxin can kill all by itself, primarily because it is made in horses, and has horrendous side-effects in its own right. And some people treated with anti-tetanus toxoid, will die of the toxoid side-effects, but that is the risk you take, if you think you have a chance of dying from tetanus anyway.....

But the article also recognises that the anti-toxin is not the only reason, because they cover their bums by also talking about improved obstetric techniques and neonatal care. And I would have to say wound care also. But the graph is pretty amazing.

In interesting study in the American Journal of Public Health, August 1984, Vol 74, No 8, showed that in 1,900 adults over 20 years of age, the overall percentage immunised was 38.6%. Now if, in 1979, in american, only 38.6% of adults were immunised, what are the factors which operated then to prevent hundreds of thousands of these unimmunised adults dying from tetanus every day?

And obviously there are people still around in USA who still have never been vaccinated to this day, including all the Amish, who all work with horses and haven't died out yet as a community.

But let's look at something else as well. As to why tetanus has always been a rare disease in civilian communities in places like America.

The medical profession has always stated that a person does not acquire natural immunity to tetanus. But the funny thing is that in 1975 in Dakar, in the proceeding of the 4th international symposium on tetanus, they talked about "latent" natural immunity causing reactions to primary immunisation.

Then there was the study in JAMA Nov 19, 1982, Volume 248, No 19, in which a large number of the unvaccinated Amish showed serological evidence of immunity to both diphtheria and tetanus.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Off to bed...

post #23 of 47
To me the tetanus case is the perfect example of the ridiculous scare tactics practiced by the ones interested in selling their vaxes. The bacteria, Clostridium tetanii, are not even pathogens! Having this desease is something very weird, like being struck by lightning or a falling brick, and is probably the result of a strange chain of events. A simple wound, even if it is deep, etc, should not lead to this desease in an organism that has some sort of immunity.

When I was researching tetanus I stumbled upon botulism. This is caused by Clostridium botulinum. See, the same genus of bacteria, just a different species. Also not a pathogen, but can cause even death in weird situations. Now, where is all the propaganda for this desease being so dangerous? There is no vax to sell, otherwise mothers would be convinced by doctors that if they don't vax their kids can die of it. The same goes for the other bacteria of the genus that can cause other unpleasant things. Who knows, maybe they are working on these vaxes (as they seem to want to expand all the time), so then we will suddenly hear of all the horrible deaths caused by these mean bacteria.

After deciding not to vax my ds I was scared to death during the first year. I read a lot though and slowly realised how criminal this propaganda is. Instead of encouraging mothers to learn how they should promote their kids health and safety, it pushes an injection as the solution to all concerns. Parents are then just trusting their doctors for every situation, instead of trying to understand themselves what is going on with their kids.
post #24 of 47
Wow. Thanks, Planta. I never really thought about that at all. Botulinum spores are everywhere, just like tetanus. Hey, now they're even investigating it as a cause of SIDS. They've found that the botulinum in the intestines of some babies who died of SIDS is pretty much identical to the botulinum in the household dust of those children, meaning that it had somehow found its way into the babies' intestines, causing a condition that was labeled "SIDS". The fatality rate for botulism and tetanus are about the same nowadays - 10% or so - but there were only about 3 cases of wound botulism every year in the entire US until 1992. Since then, there have been maybe 20 a year, I think. So apparently it is more uncommon to get botulism from a contaminated wound, but if you do get it, your chance of recovery is about the same.
post #25 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Planta
When I was researching tetanus I stumbled upon botulism. This is caused by Clostridium botulinum. See, the same genus of bacteria, just a different species. Also not a pathogen, but can cause even death in weird situations. Now, where is all the propaganda for this desease being so dangerous?
dont people pay good money to have that injected into thier faces?
post #26 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquaduct View Post
Look in archives for more information...excellent stuff there.

I might add that tetanus is so rare that they have worked out you have 45 times more chance in the US of being killed by lightening than of dying from tetanus. Of the 50 to 70 cases a year nearly all of them are elderly or injecting drug users. Both groups are well known to have higher rates of malnourishment in them. some studies implicate low levels of vit. C in the susceptibility to tetanus.

Another thing: There were over half a million wounded US soldiers during WW1, but only 70 ever developed tetanus. And none of those wounded soldiers who didnt get tetanus had been vaccinated. The vaccine wasn't around in those days. And that was one of the muddiest, bloodiest wars ever. Many had shrapnel wounds which are deeply penetrating and potentially anaerobic....the supposed ideal wounds to develop tetanus.

I know this post is so old but I wanted to point out that in my vaccination book by avia jill romm she states that out of 500k wounded soldiers from ww1, 700 of them got tetanus.. not 70. when the vaccine was introduced by ww2, only 12 per 2 million wounded got tetanus. she does say proper wound care/better hygiene reduces the chances etc. and that could have had something to do with the decline. but out of all the diseases, tetanus is the only one that really scares me! i am only half way thru this book, but it sounds like even this author is nervous about tetanus. one day my hubby and i would like to raise chickens and goats so i am even concerned about myself getting tetanus!

are the rates of tetanus so low b/c of the vaccine? or had they been low in children before the vaccine was introduced?
post #27 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsbrunette View Post

are the rates of tetanus so low b/c of the vaccine? or had they been low in children before the vaccine was introduced?
They've ALWAYS been low.

They even admit that they just "assume" that the vaccine works. They don't have any proof.

-Angela
post #28 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsbrunette View Post
but out of all the diseases, tetanus is the only one that really scares me! i am only half way thru this book, but it sounds like even this author is nervous about tetanus. one day my hubby and i would like to raise chickens and goats so i am even concerned about myself getting tetanus!

are the rates of tetanus so low b/c of the vaccine? or had they been low in children before the vaccine was introduced?
I recommend reading "How to Raise a Healthy Child in Spite of Your Dr"; this ped said Tetanus was the last he "let go" but he did let it go.

Forget about WWI, let's look at today. In the US average of 43 people per year get Tetanus and there are 0-2 deaths per year out of a population of 303,208,708 million. For a child to get Tetanus is exceedingly rare, and death is even more rare. Tetanus is primarily a disease of the elderly and others with poor circulation, like diabetics. Proper wound care is the best prevention of Tetanus.
post #29 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmeline II View Post
I recommend reading "How to Raise a Healthy Child in Spite of Your Dr"; this ped said Tetanus was the last he "let go" but he did let it go.

Forget about WWI, let's look at today. In the US average of 43 people per year get Tetanus and there are 0-2 deaths per year out of a population of 303,208,708 million. For a child to get Tetanus is exceedingly rare, and death is even more rare. Tetanus is primarily a disease of the elderly and others with poor circulation, like diabetics. Proper wound care is the best prevention of Tetanus.
i see what you are saying. but is it rare b/c of the vaccine? im not trying to cause problems. i am really just curious.
post #30 of 47
Not only is tetanus incredibly rare (contraction that is, not existance) but the tetanus vaccine hasn't even been tested for efficacy.

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pin...ds/tetanus.pdf

Quote:
Efficacy of the toxoid has never been studied in a vaccine
trial. It can be inferred from protective antitoxin levels that
a complete tetanus toxoid series has a clinical efficacy of
virtually 100%; cases of tetanus occurring in fully immunized
persons whose last dose was within the last 10 years are
extremely rare.
You tell me. With all the claims made regarding vaccines...they can't even say this works "for sure"? It's never even been studied?!?! But they want to claim credit for low tetanus incidence. It's a joke. You're asking for something that can't POSSIBLY be qualified. Even the people SELLING the vax can't say it works!

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5203a1.htm

Quote:
During 1998--2000, an average of 43 cases of tetanus was reported annually; the average annual incidence was 0.16 cases/million population. The highest average annual incidence of reported tetanus was among persons aged >60 years (0.35 cases/million population), persons of Hispanic ethnicity (0.37 cases/million population), and older adults known to have diabetes (0.70 cases/million population). Fifteen percent of the cases were among injection-drug users. The case-fatality ratio was 18% among 113 patients with known outcome; 75% of the deaths were among patients aged >60 years.
Sooo...unless you/your child are over 60, diabetic and an injection-drug addict, you're not a high-risk.
post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by attachedmamaof3 View Post
Not only is tetanus incredibly rare (contraction that is, not existance) but the tetanus vaccine hasn't even been tested for efficacy.

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pin...ds/tetanus.pdf



You tell me. With all the claims made regarding vaccines...they can't even say this works "for sure"? It's never even been studied?!?! But they want to claim credit for low tetanus incidence. It's a joke. You're asking for something that can't POSSIBLY be qualified. Even the people SELLING the vax can't say it works!

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5203a1.htm



Sooo...unless you/your child are over 60, diabetic and an injection-drug addict, you're not a high-risk.

ok, got it! thanks.
post #32 of 47
Yah, it's hard to explain without the links!!

Once you read those it kind of clicks.

OH, so they don't know if it works, but they claim it does because tetanus is so rare. Maybe the vax doesn't work at all and tetanus is just rare! There's nothing that says otherwise, because they haven't looked. (which IMO is very, very telling)

So, I could say (for example):

A: If you want to stop a leak in your roof, when you're in your house and think it's going to rain, just point your finger in the air and say "NO!" It works, I'm telling you!

B: How do you know it works? Have you tested it anywhere? Have you tried other things? Tell me more!

A: No, I haven't tested it, but I know it works because I don't get rained on.

To me, the tetanus shot is just as ridiculous.
post #33 of 47
I would like to add to this discussion, I am glad it was brought out from the dusty shelves!

Please respond to any of my statements, which are my opinions about info I have read (meaning not necessarily fact).

To me, discussing mortality/morbidity from tetanus doesn't matter - it is a horrible illness that I don't want my child to get.

Although the vaccine was never studied, it seems clear to me, that the vaccine does work for most of the population: Population = vaxed status > non-vaxed status / cases in non-vaxed > vaxed.
Added to that there is (some) evidence that the illness is milder in people who have been vaxed.

This short, interesting report: http://pediatrics.aappublications.or.../full/109/1/e2
In an 8 year period, 13 cases of tetanus in AGEs 3-15 years old; 8 from pedal puncture wound, 3 from other puncture, 2 from blunt trauma.
Only 2 had been fully vaccinated (the others were not vaccinated).
I would be kicking myself in the butt if one of them were my kids... Foot injuries tend to bleed a lot on their own...

I find the MT quote above stating that repeated vaccinations may have the effect of tolerance very interesting.

Planta/Plummeting, I love the botulism spore comparison, but I still can't put it into perspective with the majority of the population being vaccinated. (again, I don't care about morbidity). AND the fact that botulism doesn't enter through a wound - it is ingested - and has to be ingested in the state that it is already toxic (unoxigenated food source). Tetanus isn't a threat to us if we ingest it.

I would love to look at a country that does not vaccinate children against tetanus' rates (It wouldn't matter to me if they were a barefoot 3rd world country - my kids are barefoot and getting cuts in the dirt on their feet all the time! well, summertime). DOes one exist?

What is another method of prevention besides the vaccination?

My current 'recommendation' for tetanus vaccination is maybe around 6 years old to get 2-3 doses of INDIVIDUAL tetanus vaccination. I just wish I could prove to myself that until they get those vax's, they will be ok. But for me the risk of a multisubstance vaccination on an immature immune system is not worth the risk.

Oh yes, I also believe in Vit c to bowel tolerance to treat it.
post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by krizzanne View Post

This short, interesting report: http://pediatrics.aappublications.or.../full/109/1/e2
In an 8 year period, 13 cases of tetanus in AGEs 3-15 years old; 8 from pedal puncture wound, 3 from other puncture, 2 from blunt trauma.
Only 2 had been fully vaccinated (the others were not vaccinated).
I would be kicking myself in the butt if one of them were my kids... Foot injuries tend to bleed a lot on their own...
it looks like a bigger risk factor than not being vaccinated for tetanus is being caucasian, and being male is almost as big of a risk factor. 6 of the cases were in the amish community.

THIS is the "science" and "proof" that vaccines work?
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Our cases likely constitute an underestimate of the actual number of tetanus cases in children during the study period. Although tetanus is a reportable disease in all states, not all cases are recognized or reported.21 National surveillance for tetanus, which is a passive reporting system, depends on voluntary reporting from clinicians through state and local health departments. If all tetanus cases had been reported, then the proportion of cases in vaccine objectors might be different
I think this says it all. Even the "exemptors" get mild, unrecognizable tetanus. It's the few, the miniscule few, who show symptoms and become ill, whether they're vaxxed or not. (in this particular study, less than 3% of cases during an 8 yr period) Again, people at high-risk for tetanus are not children. (although the study you cite makes it look like just being a male or Amish is high risk!) Did you read the full text or just the abstract?

Disregard if you will, but a company who sells a product usually puts its selling points right out front. If the tetanus shot was the "miracle" it's purported to be, they'd have done study after study showing it's effectiveness.

To do no studies whatsoever even attempting to demonstrate its efficacy is lacksaidasical at best. To then sell it based on inference is negligent.
post #36 of 47
Oh, sorry kidspiration!! I typed my reply and walked away to deal with the kids...didn't even see you posted!!

Hahhaa you stated it much more succinctly than I did!
post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by attachedmamaof3 View Post
Oh, sorry kidspiration!! I typed my reply and walked away to deal with the kids...didn't even see you posted!!

Hahhaa you stated it much more succinctly than I did!


i was just about to post a : to yours.

especially agree with this part, which bears repeating.

Quote:
To do no studies whatsoever even attempting to demonstrate its efficacy is lacksaidasical at best. To then sell it based on inference is negligent.
in addition, as you pointed out, the study mentions that not all cases of tetanus are reported. i hadn't even thought of the possibility of "mild" or subclinical tetanus. i always thought of tetanus as being one of those black-and-white diseases, where you get it and you know it and it's bad. guess i was wrong. imagine that...learn something new every day.
post #38 of 47
Attachedmamof3, and Kidspiration, I appreciate your responses!

When I made the statement of population = vax>nonvax / non-vax tetanus cases> vax tetanus cases, I was more referring to this article and table: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/320/7231/383 and http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/320/7231/383/Fu1

Just curious: are you both under the assumption that the tetanus vax does not work at all? or just saying they way it has been touted is unethical/wrong?

In the article you responded about: Don't you suspect that the subclinical cases of unreported tetanus are probably attributed to vaccinated individuals (so when they said the proportions would be different , they meant more in favor of vaccination). Even in this article, the 2 kids that were vaccinated had hospital stays of 2 and 3 days, where the unvaccinated had stays of 10,12,16,19 and upward days. (it looks like TIG made a big difference in that as well)

Also, the fact that they were mostly Amish, white, and male is just a reflection of the majority of at-risk non-vaccinated population. Most in the US are probably Amish, the males are the ones working outside, and Amish are generally white. I don't think the kids running around suburbia in their tennis shoes are at quite the same risk.
post #39 of 47
Quote:
the fact that they were mostly Amish, white, and male is just a reflection of the majority of at-risk non-vaccinated population. Most in the US are probably Amish, the males are the ones working outside, and Amish are generally white. I don't think the kids running around suburbia in their tennis shoes are at quite the same risk.
Actually, the CDC disagrees with you. I posted a link/synopsis earlier in this thread which clearly shows the at-risk population. White/Amish/Males are not on the list. I will quote myself:

Quote:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5203a1.htm


Quote:
Quote:
During 1998--2000, an average of 43 cases of tetanus was reported annually; the average annual incidence was 0.16 cases/million population. The highest average annual incidence of reported tetanus was among persons aged >60 years (0.35 cases/million population), persons of Hispanic ethnicity (0.37 cases/million population), and older adults known to have diabetes (0.70 cases/million population). Fifteen percent of the cases were among injection-drug users. The case-fatality ratio was 18% among 113 patients with known outcome; 75% of the deaths were among patients aged >60 years.
Sooo...unless you/your child are over 60, diabetic and an injection-drug addict, you're not a high-risk.
Quote:
Just curious: are you both under the assumption that the tetanus vax does not work at all? or just saying they way it has been touted is unethical/wrong
Both. I don't assume. The people selling the shot assume it works. I know for a fact it hasn't been proven; therefore I object to its use as well as the way people have been misled into believing the vax is necessary and works. I couldn't sell a radio on Ebay without stating whether or not it works!

Quote:
Don't you suspect that the subclinical cases of unreported tetanus are probably attributed to vaccinated individuals (so when they said the proportions would be different , they meant more in favor of vaccination).
No, I don't. I suspect that there are subclinical tetanus in both vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. I also don't believe that more subclinical NON-vaxed individuals would necessarily support tetanus vaccination. Quite the opposite. People vax for tetanus out of fear. Subclinical tetanus doesn't inspire the same fear as lock-jaw scaremongering.

In fact, I've read this study before, but take it with a grain of salt. 13 children isn't enough to base anything on, IMO.
post #40 of 47
Thread Starter 
Wow. So cool to see this thread again. Tetanus was the hardest vax to let go of. I strarted this thread 3 years ago. I remember being unsure. 3 years later, I've never been so sure of anything. There is no way I would ever inject that stuff into my kid.
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