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Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy (MSP)?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Geez...I read something somewhere else that suggested mothers who expose their children to chickenpox, measles, mumps, other illnesses suffer from MSP...:Puke

But seriously--what do you think of this allegation?

I mean if this were true--every parent who KNOWLING exposed their child to ANY illness would suffer from MSP--wouldn't they??? Gosh...I intentionally exposed my son to a COLD over the Thanksgiving holiday (cause I wanted to see family)--OMG!!!

Anyone been accused in real life? Thoughts?
post #2 of 15
:By that 'logic', no more than one that sticks their child with needles on a regular basis. This was on another board, I take it? Sounds like someone is thinking with head firmly planted in
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsfatty
Geez...I read something somewhere else that suggested mothers who expose their children to chickenpox, measles, mumps, other illnesses suffer from MSP...
But I thought MSP was about getting attention (from medical professionals), and I'm guessing most people who take their kids to pox parties probably don't rush to the ped when the kid gets sick. So they couldn't possibly meet the definition, right?
post #4 of 15
Quote:
But I thought MSP was about getting attention (from medical professionals), and I'm guessing most people who take their kids to pox parties probably don't rush to the ped when the kid gets sick. So they couldn't possibly meet the definition, right?
That's what I was thinking too.
post #5 of 15
We vax our kids, but I think that allegation is just stupid. It just comes from people who don't understand the ideas behind not vaxing. I don't agree with the ideas, but I do understand them.
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mavery
But I thought MSP was about getting attention (from medical professionals), and I'm guessing most people who take their kids to pox parties probably don't rush to the ped when the kid gets sick. So they couldn't possibly meet the definition, right?
Yeah...that's what I thought!
post #7 of 15
post #8 of 15
Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy is an extremely controversial "diagnosis." I, and many others, believe it is bogus. Unfortunately, it has been used to take children away from their parents. If you read the description, it can apply to pretty much any parent at any time.
post #9 of 15
Heaven help a normal parent in the presence of a Munchausen-diagnosis-happy professional. I mean, if there is proof that a parent is harming a child, call the police. But this "diagnosis" based on normal, noncriminal behavior, and illnesses that doctors can't figure out is in itself criminal.

"Guidelines for suspecting and identifying Munchausen by Proxy"
http://www.munchausen.com/

A child who has one or more medical problems that do not respond to treatment or that follow an unusual course that is persistent, puzzling and unexplained.

Physical or laboratory findings that are highly unusual, discrepant with history, or physically or clinically impossible.

A parent, usually the mother, who appears to be medically knowledgeable and/or fascinated with medical details and hospital gossip, appears to enjoy the hospital environment, and expresses interest in the details of other patients’ problems.

A highly attentive parent who is reluctant to leave her child’s side and who herself seems to require constant attention.

A parent who appears to be unusually calm in the face of serious difficulties in her child’s medical course while being highly supportive and encouraging of the physician, or one who is angry, devalues staff, and demands further intervention, more procedures, second opinions, and transfers to other more sophisticated facilities.

The suspected parent may work in the health care field herself or profess interest in a health-related job.

The signs and symptoms of a child’s illness do not occur in the parent’s absence (hospitalization and careful monitoring may be necessary to establish this casual relationship).

A family history of similar sibling illness or unexplained sibling illness or death.

A parent with symptoms similar to her child’s own medical problems or an illness history that itself is puzzling and unusual.

A suspected parent with an emotionally distant relationship with her spouse; the spouse often fails to visit the patient and has little contact with physicians even when the child is hospitalized with serious illness.

A parent who reports dramatic, negative events, such as house fires, burglaries, car accidents, that affect her and her family while her child is undergoing treatment.

A parent who seems to have an insatiable need for adulation or who makes self-serving efforts at public aknowledgement of her abilities.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by janellesmommy
A child who has one or more medical problems that do not respond to treatment or that follow an unusual course that is persistent, puzzling and unexplained.
Oh, you mean like when the lovely doctors load up our kids with drugs to make them "better", only for the illness to get worse?

Yeah, many things can be twisted into Munchausen by Proxy. :
post #11 of 15
Quote:
"Guidelines for suspecting and identifying Munchausen by Proxy"
http://www.munchausen.com/

A parent, usually the mother, who appears to be medically knowledgeable and/or fascinated with medical details ...
Lika a doula? Or a veterinary technician?

Quote:
A highly attentive parent who is reluctant to leave her child’s side
Like all AP parents?

Quote:
and who herself seems to require constant attention.
Like a parent worried about her child and needing reassurance and support?

Quote:
A parent who appears to be unusually calm in the face of serious difficulties in her child’s medical course while being highly supportive and encouraging of the physician,
What if they have a deep faith that God will bring their child through this?

Quote:
or one who is angry, devalues staff, and demands further intervention, more procedures, second opinions, and transfers to other more sophisticated facilities.
Those darn pesky patients needing second opinions...

Quote:
The suspected parent may work in the health care field herself or profess interest in a health-related job.
Like a doula? Or a veterinary technician?

Quote:
A family history of similar sibling illness or unexplained sibling illness or death.

A parent with symptoms similar to her child’s own medical problems or an illness history that itself is puzzling and unusual.
Uhhhh ... genetics?

[QUOTE]A parent who reports dramatic, negative events, such as house fires, burglaries, car accidents, that affect her and her family while her child is undergoing treatment. [QUOTE]

wierd

Quote:
A parent who seems to have an insatiable need for adulation or who makes self-serving efforts at public aknowledgement of her abilities.
Well that's me... Just kidding!


I totally believe Munchausen Syndrome affects people, just felt like debating.
post #12 of 15
Man, that's some really scary criteria! I try to stay far, far away from unknown doctors for that reason (among others). One of the doctors my dh works with insinuated once that we might be abusive parents or need counseling because the records showed that our kids had been to the ER a few times over the last year or so. Yeah... I guess if your kid jumps off the couch into the coffee table and needs a couple of stitches, you should just stay home because someone at some point is going to cry abuse of some sort. One time I slipped on the stairs and spained my ANKLE. They were trewating my dh like he beat me or something because I slipped on the stairs. They kept asking me if that was what really happened! I was thinking I should say "No. I lied. My husband beats my ankle all the time!" LOL!

ETA - I do firmly believe that MBP exists, but not commonly. Those are people that have their kid drinking a bit of drain cleaner each day or something crazy like that to make them appear to have a pathological illness.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by craftykitty
Man, that's some really scary criteria! I try to stay far, far away from unknown doctors for that reason (among others). One of the doctors my dh works with insinuated once that we might be abusive parents or need counseling because the records showed that our kids had been to the ER a few times over the last year or so.
I guess this takes the thread a bit far away from MPS, but I've been concerned about this for the first time lately. My 2 yr old broke his collarbone a few weeks ago, and though there was no hint from anyone that we might have done anything wrong, I was just surprised by the number of times I was asked how it happened. Like there might be some inconsistency in my story or something.

I was also cringing a bit when asked in the ER if his vaxes are up to date. He's actually had most of them, but I don't want any more. So what happens if you say no?
post #14 of 15
made me think- if any mother got caught injecting sputem into her child, she'd be in jail. i suppose anyone aquiescing to same is also guilty under those criteria. :P
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mavery
But I thought MSP was about getting attention (from medical professionals), and I'm guessing most people who take their kids to pox parties probably don't rush to the ped when the kid gets sick. So they couldn't possibly meet the definition, right?
that is exactly why i don't think that claim holds any water - you have to consider the motivation.
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