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NT December Thread - Page 6

post #101 of 156
With my sourdough, I used to keep the culture in the fridge. Once a week, in the evening, I would get it out & put it in a pot with more flour & water. I'd leave it overnight till it got all bubbly. I would then take some out to use as the next culture & put that back in the fridge. I'd then out the rest of the culture in my bread maker with some flour, more water & salt. Enuf to make a dough the consistency of my earlobe. I'd run the breadmaker thru its dough cycle & then leave it to sit for a few hours or overnight again until the dough had doubled in size. THen I'd either take it out & bake it in the oven or put the bread maker on the bake cycle.

The reason I lost it is I was getting some very nice organic sourdough rye bread so I neglected it : In hindsight, what I would do to keep it alive is take the sourdough culture out of the fridge & feed it once a week. ie do the sponge stage. & then just not make any bread with it.

What about beet kvass ? I tried making some of this once & it was really ropey. Any tips ?
post #102 of 156
I jsut got wild fermentation...looks good so far..I am excited to start trying stuff....I have yet to venture into the sour/fermented stuff....lol
post #103 of 156
I am about 3/4 of the way through WF and am loving it! I am in the bread section and I can't wait to get a sourdough starter going in early Jan.

Anyone know if you can just put a rounded mass of dough in the oven (in large cast iron pan???) as opposed to using loaf pans? I love round loaves and I hate buying uneeded kitchen equipment (the loaf pans).

On a sad note: we are almost out of the massive load of raw dairy my parents gave us last month!!!! A whole month with raw milk, cream, butter, kefir.... and now.... nothing!!! We are planning on putting in an order to Organic Pastures in January. But you know, their milk seemed awfully thin and white. We got one gallon of milk from a small farm in PA as part of the load from parents and it was way creamier and had a beautiful creamy yellow color (I've read this equals high vitamin content) Anyone noticed thinness or too-whiteness with OP milk???
post #104 of 156
I think I have done bread that way...on a stone probably and not my cast iron but I don't see why it wouldn't work so long as you could get it out of the pan....
post #105 of 156
Holiztic,

I don't know about the OP milk, but I bought their butter at Whole Foods last year when I lived in California and it was nice and yellow. I believe it was in the springtime when the cows are supposed to be eating newly growing grass so it was more yellow than in the wintertime. Maybe the milk is just seasonally that way and yellower in the springtime....

-Kelly
post #106 of 156
I've often baked bread in a round mass on a plain baking sheet. In earth ovens, you just usually bake the bread on the hot floor of the oven.

I have a bread question. I can get this really yummy dense black german sourdough bread. The ingredients just say rye flour, water, salt & sourdough culture. it seems to have grains in it so I am not sure where they come from. Also the black colouring. It's not sweet so it isn't molasses. I would love to be able to make some at home as the kids love it. I've googled for a roggenbrot recipe. The ingredients seem to match but I can't see how the colour or texture would be there. Anyone ever make this ?
post #107 of 156
So, can I get a really small amount premade? I'd like to try some kimchee, but would hate to have a bunch that I hated, kwim? I will try the ginger carrots or salsa in January (I, too, will be back in Jan, meek and penitent!).

I appreciate your comments. It seems that there is always something new to learn and try.

As far as the difference in color of the milk. The color can change as a result of the feed the animals are eating (early grass/high moisture content vs. dry hay/silage matter in the fall). It may also be a factor of where the cow is in her lactation cycle. Cows who have just calved will have a more yellow butter. Generally, the farther away from calving a cow gets, the lighter her milk becomes. So, it is probably a combination of feed, time of lactation, and type of grass/hay, etc.
post #108 of 156
Thanks for the links, cobluegirl and Bia (I hope I'm getting the names right, lol). There just seems to be volumes of info about pasteurization, and just a very little bit about homogenization.

gardenmommy, I have been meaning to post about my cortido and I think it might help you. I made saurkraut (not according to her recipe) and I didn't mind it, but it wasn't delicious. Mine has been pretty mild, though. Then I tried the cortido in NT, modified to use the saurkraut method I like. The basic saurkraut recipe I like is I head of cabbage, 4 tsp. salt. Chop or shred cabbage, salt it, and let it sit for an hour. Then stuff it into a sterilized (or very clean) quart sized mason jar. You have to work at it, but it should all fit. I find that using an empty spice jar (like you get at a bulk store) to pound it down one scoop at a time right from the beginning really helps in getting it to fit. Then for cortido, I add a few shredded carrots (I like my cole slaw heavy on carrots), and for each jar, I add 2-3 garlic cloves and a pinch of red pepper flakes. I think when I did one batch, it filled a quart sized jar and either a half quart or a pint sized jar too. I found it easier to just double it, then it fit better into my jars. And of course, I increased the salt proportionately. I made this up in the fall (September?), left it in a warm cupboard for two weeks (in a tray, it did drip) and then put it in my cool basement pantry until a week or two ago. It had a stronger flavour, but it was nicely spicey too. I actually found it a bit too spicey for me (but I'm a wimp with that), but it is great with some mayo added, or I eat it plain with an omlette. That's all I've tried so far.

For sour dairy, I don't see a problem with, say, having your kefir in a smoothie. When I have cream that has started to get old, I find putting it in soup, sauce, or making something like scalloped potatoes or an omlette or French toast with it works well. I wouldn't use it as a topping like I would commercial sour cream, unless perhaps I actually make cultured sour cream... hmmm.

But, I am another one who likes the "rank" flavour of a lot of these foods -- strong cheeses were about the only thing I ate before that had it, and I loved the ones I tried. I like the cheesiness of cultured butter.
post #109 of 156
Brisen, I will try your method in January, when I am doing penance for all my food transgressions (I just indulged in some very yummy cinnamon rolls this morning!). See, I don't even like really strong cheese. I never have. I can tell this is going to be quite a challenge.
post #110 of 156
Thread Starter 
So far so good on holiday food. I had apple crisp last night and this morning and some dark chocolate on Monday. That's a huge splurge for a no-sugar person. I'm headed to Bucks County PA for Christmas and we'll see how the travel goes.

Holiztic -- I'm not sure about the OP milk either. It seems very rich to me, but I haven't had another source of grassfed (or raw) cow's milk.
post #111 of 156
This is my little holiday eating secret: I've found that drinking a glass of beet kvass helps to make me feel not as horrible as I normally would after eating not so healthy things.
post #112 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brisen
Thanks for the links, cobluegirl and Bia (I hope I'm getting the names right, lol). There just seems to be volumes of info about pasteurization, and just a very little bit about homogenization.

gardenmommy, I have been meaning to post about my cortido and I think it might help you. I made saurkraut (not according to her recipe) and I didn't mind it, but it wasn't delicious. Mine has been pretty mild, though. Then I tried the cortido in NT, modified to use the saurkraut method I like. The basic saurkraut recipe I like is I head of cabbage, 4 tsp. salt. Chop or shred cabbage, salt it, and let it sit for an hour. Then stuff it into a sterilized (or very clean) quart sized mason jar. You have to work at it, but it should all fit. I find that using an empty spice jar (like you get at a bulk store) to pound it down one scoop at a time right from the beginning really helps in getting it to fit. Then for cortido, I add a few shredded carrots (I like my cole slaw heavy on carrots), and for each jar, I add 2-3 garlic cloves and a pinch of red pepper flakes. I think when I did one batch, it filled a quart sized jar and either a half quart or a pint sized jar too. I found it easier to just double it, then it fit better into my jars. And of course, I increased the salt proportionately. I made this up in the fall (September?), left it in a warm cupboard for two weeks (in a tray, it did drip) and then put it in my cool basement pantry until a week or two ago. It had a stronger flavour, but it was nicely spicey too. I actually found it a bit too spicey for me (but I'm a wimp with that), but it is great with some mayo added, or I eat it plain with an omlette. That's all I've tried so far.

For sour dairy, I don't see a problem with, say, having your kefir in a smoothie. When I have cream that has started to get old, I find putting it in soup, sauce, or making something like scalloped potatoes or an omlette or French toast with it works well. I wouldn't use it as a topping like I would commercial sour cream, unless perhaps I actually make cultured sour cream... hmmm.

But, I am another one who likes the "rank" flavour of a lot of these foods -- strong cheeses were about the only thing I ate before that had it, and I loved the ones I tried. I like the cheesiness of cultured butter.

just be careful with that notmilk site...the guy is extreme....and I just read a few articles(by him) about the ecoli found in a WA farm (same farm I got my holiday turkey) and I am really irked at him...grrr...
post #113 of 156

Cream cheese question...

HI guys! While I have had the NT book for over a year and a half, I am finally jumping in! So far, things are going well. I just have one question though. I am in the process of making cream cheese from yougurt and I am wondering how long it will/could take for all the whey to strain out of it. I've had that towel tied to the wooden spoon since 1 am (bad timing ) and it's still dripping.
post #114 of 156
for your cream cheese, it depends on how dry you want it. 12 hours should be plenty (usually overnight is good).

I finally made my kimchi and ginger carrots. The baby was so excited to see kimchi again, he was eating it out of the bowl as I was making it, then he helped pack it into the jars with his little hands, licking his fingers the whole time. He can see the big jar on the cupboard, he keeps coming up to me with his little spoon and pointing at the jar.
post #115 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hibou
for your cream cheese, it depends on how dry you want it. 12 hours should be plenty (usually overnight is good).
Thanks so much for your reply. Perfect timing, I think too. It looks (and tastes) great. I plan to use it for the salmon spread.
post #116 of 156
Re: OP milk- Organic Pastures uses Holstein cows, which is lower in fat content than other cows milk like Jerseys or Guernseys. So that could explain the difference if the farm that you'd gotten the dairy products from had a herd of non-Holstein cows.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cobluegirl
just be careful with that notmilk site...the guy is extreme....and I just read a few articles(by him) about the ecoli found in a WA farm (same farm I got my holiday turkey) and I am really irked at him...grrr...
I have been following the e.coli stories too, though I have not read the articles by the not milk guy. So sad.
post #117 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by toraji
I have been following the e.coli stories too, though I have not read the articles by the not milk guy. So sad.
Could someone link to what's going on please? I haven't heard anything about this.
post #118 of 156
well...I dont have a link but get daily updates from the farm. I don't think I can post the last update on here but one girl is home and the other two kids are getting better slowly and of all the people tested for ecoli only seven have been confirmed I believe. The farm is cooperating as much as possible and doing everything in their power to help the families in teh hosp.
The media is blowing it out of proportion as usual and giving incorrect information.
post #119 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by cobluegirl
well...I dont have a link but get daily updates from the farm. I don't think I can post the last update on here but one girl is home and the other two kids are getting better slowly and of all the people tested for ecoli only seven have been confirmed I believe. The farm is cooperating as much as possible and doing everything in their power to help the families in teh hosp.
The media is blowing it out of proportion as usual and giving incorrect information.
Oh, how terrible for all of them.
post #120 of 156
I am cooking a pastured turkey for Christmas dinner on Sunday. Do I need to do anything different with it? Will it be good if I cook it like I normally do? It's thawing in the sink at the moment, so I should be able to do something with it by tomorrow night, if need be.

What is the story with the e. coli in WA?

I think that we are nearing the end of our Christmas treats and goodies. We've finally made it through all our parties. We just have our family gathering and one more birthday party over the next week. Then we are going to change our ways.

Hibou, I think that is really cute about your little one and the kimchee! My children are that way when we shop in the store. They get all excited in the produce section, and couldn't care less about anything packaged!
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