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How did you 'come' to natural birth? - Page 2

post #21 of 49
It never occurred to me to birth any other way. My mom and sister and other family members birth naturally. I had a friend in school who had a baby her sophmore year, born naturally (gave him up for adoption though) I watched her birth video and cried at it. Another friend had a baby her senior year, naturally. These were teens, you know, people who society pins as weak and vulnerable and they have a high rate of drugged births. I'd never given more than one second of thought to a non-natural birth until I took a childbirth calss during my first pregnancy. There I was, 18 (looked 13), and of the 12 couples in the room, I was the most adament about wanting a natural birth. These women, twice my age, frowned at me and looked at me like I was stupid and gave me the "wait til you get there!" looks. Even after hearing the teacher's schpiel about drugs, I still never wanted any part of that. Babies were meant to come out of our yonis without any help from anybody! My husband? He never imagined babies coming out of drugged mothers either. I really lucked out with him because it wasn't something we talked about and the pregnancy was a surprise (you can't plan miracles, right!?!!) To him, babies are born naturally and put to breast. I felt the same way. I just never thought there was any other way. Now I've had two beautiful natural births and will have another one here in about 4.5 weeks (Yikes!). I'm looking forward to it

Namaste, Tara
post #22 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperStar
How did you 'come' to natural birth?

Through my mother's vagina of course!


Like many of the other posters, I had a natural birthing, babywearing, breastfeeding mother, so it just seemed obvious. I'm so lucky!

Love you mom!
post #23 of 49
My mum's advice was "Take all the drugs and do what the nice doctor says." It can only be upwards from there

I read about home birth in a Sheila Kitzinger book in my early 20s and thought, "Hey! That makes sense!" Once pregnant (at 34) I started researching again and things have only gotten worse so I knew for sure it was the right decision. Naively, I thought everyone researched major life decisions like that... I've seen women put more effort into researching a pram than a birth. Makes me very sad for those babies. Having known the trauma of hospital "birth" now I'm only more cemented in my view - oddly enough the research backs me LOL.
post #24 of 49
When I got pregnant with my first baby I had never given the subject of childbirth much thought. I wanted to read up about it and by coincidence I borrowed the book "Birth Reborn" by Dr. Michel Odent from the library.
Reading the book I realised how it all rang so very true to me, and I knew right away that that was the kind of birth I wanted.

So I had a go with my son, but eventually ended up with an epidural anyway - though after a very long (44 hours) labor that stalled completely around 8 cms dilation. I got pitocin and an epi.
This experience more than anything confirmed to me that I wanted my next birth to be natural and it also showed me how that was clearly unlikely in a hospital setting - even though my midwife was "pro-natural". I simply could not birth in an unfamiliar setting. And that lead me on to a homebirth as the next obvious step.
My daughter was born at home four months ago after a 90 minute labor!

Inca
post #25 of 49
In a very non-traditional, roundabout way.

5 years ago - High-pressure job, didn't want kids, thought breastfeeding was gross, never heard of unmedicated delivery.

3 years ago - got a different job, bored one day joined a very mainstream newlywed message board. A couple of "rebel" mamas posted about cloth diapering. I was intrigued. I knew I wanted to CD, then started to read about breastfeeding, non-vaxing, unmedicated childbirth, etc.

Almost 2 years ago - Gave birth to my daughter, in a hospital, naturally. No interventions.

Next babe will be born in a free standing birth center or at home, attended by a midwife.

So really, getting hooked on CDing lead me to other natural ways of parenting, and the rest is history!
post #26 of 49
I actually credit my horrible OB who helped totally uneducated me have a c/s. The only reason I planned on not having an epidural was b/c "I could tough it out" or something like that. "Epidurals are for sissies" was my thinking back then. I'm much less judgmental now. I did end up w/ an epi after they turn my pit all the way up.

I was determined - no, dead set - on having a VBAC w/ my 2nd baby. I read The Birth Book and realized I would have to go au naturel to give me the best chance of acheiving my VBAC. I almost gave in to the epi, but thankfully I was in transition by the time they got around to it. I was elated to have my VBAC, but I didn't like how it was so managed at 2nd stage. My baby wanted out, but the Dr wasn't there. They wanted me to hold her in. She finally powered her way out, leaving me w/ a pretty bad tear.

I had planned to have my 3rd baby at a BC after my successful VBAC. I actually would have had my 2nd in a BC, but I was soooo affraid that my body wouldn't work, so I wanted to be where I could just get another c/s. After checking out a Homebirth book from the library on a whim - I had to know what the big deal was - I decided that I didn't need to go anywhere during labor. Home would be just as safe, but more comfortable, than a BC. The decision was made.

I almost had my 1st baby in the BC b/c I almost didn't have insurance and it would have been more affordable to use the BC out-of-pocket. If I would have had my baby there, I probably would have had a nice, natural birth, but I feel I wouldn't have poured my heart and soul into natural birth, VBAC, etc and wouldn't be aspiring to make it my life's work. I have come to terms w/ my c/s. It is what has gotten me to this point.

ETA: My aunt went trough cancer and used every Homeopathic remedy available. She kept us very involved in all of it, and I was totally captivated by it all. I became much more interested in how all the body systems work together and in true health and diet, in general. It has filtered into my parenting and how I view life. I am much more naturally minded in everything, now. It's been a challenge putting all of it into practice, but I'm trying.
post #27 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamatarax
Another friend had a baby her senior year, naturally. These were teens, you know, people who society pins as weak and vulnerable and they have a high rate of drugged births.
Crunchy, homebirthin' teen mama here! Woot!

Quote:
Originally Posted by newtonscricket
Through my mother's vagina of course!
: truetrue.

Kewpie, very inspiring story
post #28 of 49
My mom had my two sisters and I naturally, and had my middle sister at home with a midwife. So I kind of grew up thinking all of that was normal. In high school, I wrote a paper about the hippie movement, and I had to reserach communes. I learned about The Farm, and of course, about Ina May Gaskin, and thought that was way cool, even though at that time I planned to not ever have children.

In college, I had some older, crunchy friends that started having children, and they used midwives, breastfed, and all of that. I thought that if I ever did have children, that's how I want to do it. And here I am, planning my first birth with midwives at their beautiful, homey bith center, and reading Mothering .
post #29 of 49
I'd always assumed I'd have a natural birth. With ds1, my FP was quite "hands off", and I was considered a very low risk pregnancy. I was planning to go to the hospital once contractions were 5 minutes apart, but I wasn't planning any pain relief or anything. Everything went great, until ds1 flipped during labour. When I arrived at the hospital, I was almost fully dilated, and wound up having an "emergency" c-section for breech.

That put me in the "high risk" category, which involved a referral to an OB. My FP took care of most of my prenatal care, and I intended to VBAC at home, with my OB's full support. DD also flipped towards the end (single footling...she looked like she was dancing a jig), and I ended up with another section.

My VBA2C didn't pan out, either...ds2 stayed head down, but I was "overdue" (41w, 5d) and the OB threatened to withdraw and I panicked and caved.

So....I've always been pro natural birth, but haven't had one. If I have my last baby (always wanted four), it's going to be a HBA3C. I've had enough of needles in my spine and scalpels.
post #30 of 49
I have loved babies since I was a little girl and I always loved to read baby magazines. When I was in high school I came across an issue of Mothering at the bookstore and it totally changed the way I thought about everything birth and baby. I decided I wanted a homebirth with a midwife for my future babies then. I got my hands on a copy of Spiritual Midwifery after that and it only made up my mind further!
post #31 of 49
For me it was b/c I met someone planning a homebirth, went to a prenatal appt. with her, then immediately decided I wanted that level of care when my time came (and this was waaaaaaaaay before I was pregnant for the first time). So it wasn't so much an initial decision to have a natural birth as it was to have a homebirth (and of course, those 2 go hand in hand). So my knowledge of why I wouldn't want a medicated birth came sometime after - I honestly don't even remember when (perhaps when I was taking Bradley classes???).
post #32 of 49
I'm a natural birth convert. My whole life my mom has told me that giving birth was excruciating and it was the worst pain ever. (Though she acknowledges that my younger brother's non-induced non drugged birth was much easier)

When I first got pregnant I figured I'd just get an epidural. Even though I despise needles I figured I'd get over it.

Like every thing else in my life whenever I start something new I study it to death. I bought lots of books about pregnancy. I read Husband coached childbirth. That changed my opinions about birth. I didn't like that Dr. Bradley did a lot of episiotomies but I was able to see past that.

When my dh and I signed up for Bradley classes I didn't care whether or not I had drugs in labor or not. I just wanted a positive experience.

I had an amazing and empowering natural hospital birth and plan to have the next one at home.
post #33 of 49
At nineteen, I found myself in a many-days-late-no-period-in-sight situation. I can still remember so clearly, the feeling of possibly being a mother, realizing what a child I still was, how selfish I could still be. I knew that I wanted to be a different parent than either of mine were, I knew that I wanted to be devoted to my child first and foremost.

Somehow, I figured that if I [biggest avoider of pain, ever!] could commit myself to not blotting out the pain just because I could, that it would be a big first step towards being the selfless and giving parent/person that I desired to be. So I googled it and found my way to MDC, and the rest is history.

I've been an avid lurker since, and have become an irreparable birth/kid/ap/nfl enthusiast.

Oh yeah, I wasn't pregnant back when I was nineteen, but I am now! Somehow, I've been able to get over my posting shyness to participate, now that I'm an official [kind of] mama.

That moment so long ago was so surreally illuminating. I feel so grateful for that pregnancy 'scare,' it led me to so much learning and really, an enormous shift of my worldview.
post #34 of 49

my story wants to be heard, too

Hi,

My reasoning is probably going to sound strange but it's 100% true

As a little kid, I used to lie in the floor and watch National Geographic at my Mamaw's house. The animals would stand around looking bored as their young dropped from their bodies. Then they'd lick off the afterbirth and go back to their business. Apparently, it wasn't very painful to them.

So, I hollered at the adults, "Hey, why does giving birth hurt people so much, but these animals don't feel a thing?" I got back the typical answer many adults use to explain things, "It's in the Bible"--translation: We haven't a clue. Even as a child, I wasn't a religious person, so the fact that something was written in the Bible meant nothing to me. I decided that if the zebra's and antelope could have a non-painful birth, then so could I.

That's what put the idea of a gentle birth into my head. At that age, however, I had no idea that women were given drugs or even surgery to have babies. So, a couple years went by, I was probably 11 or 12 by then, I read through a medical text my other grandparents had. One section was information about the epidural, which the book made sound like was practically mandatory. It scared the out of me. No way would I have something inserted in my back. Uh-uh no way. At this point, I still didn't realize there were other drugs, surgery, etc. I just thought giving birth had two choices, either no drugs at all, or a tube in your back. Ouch.

Fast forward to my pregnancy with Ds (15 months). I sat thinking about all this, and decided to start reading everything pregnancy related I could find. Found so many great books and articles about natural pain relief. I told myself that I could birth naturally, that it had been done for millions of years, and (my personal favorite mantra): "Giving birth is a natural bodily process".



~Nay
post #35 of 49
I'm a control freak. I didn't want doctors and nurses managing my birth. I thought my body would know just what to do. It did.
post #36 of 49
Another one here who was afraid of the idea of getting a needle in my spine. I started reading up on alternatives to epidurals. The more I read about unmedicated births, the more I felt is was the best thing for me and, more importantly, for my baby.
post #37 of 49
I didn't have an epiphany

As a teenager I met lots of my mum's friends (mostly at church) who were crunchy although I didn't really realise it at the time. I didn't know the details of their births but they bf fearlessly and were very ap.

When I became pregnant at 19 - far from home in Mexico I wasn't really aware of any choices. I went to a very expensive OB in Cancun who immediately told me I would need a cs as I was so petite (5' 0") which freaked me out; both the thought of it and the price US$5000 at the time and waaay more than I could imagine. I knew that my mum had had me and my sister without any trouble so I believed that I could do it. I didn't have any books and there was no internet and I shut my ears to the rich europeans around me who had 'had' to have cs.

Then we moved back to Mexico City and some artesan friends recommended a little clinic in the south of the city which was cheap and run by nuns. We went there and I loved it! There were no men there at all. No-one ever messed with me or poked about and I became good friends with the women who ran the pre-birth classes. She acted as my doula when I was in labour and I had a beautiful experience. I carried my babe because I couldn't afford a pushchair and I breastfed because I knew that we would be going places where clean water would be difficult to guarantee and formula would be too expensive. We co-slept because we didn't have 2 beds - or even one bed sometimes.

When I came back to the UK I met other crunchy mamas in Oxford (lots of middle class hippies and green/natural living folk here!) and concieved ds2 I knew I wanted a homebirth but I was forced into a hospital birth because I had been diagnosed with a blood clotting disorder and needed meds after the birth which the OB said could not be administered at home. Now I know that was a load of tosh and it makes me cross....

So here I am still doing the simple thing and encouraging other mums when I can.
post #38 of 49
I attended a homebirth as the youngest child's' support person when I was 19. My mother also nursed all of us, even though it wasn't fashionable in her circle. She didn't breastfeed very long, but she always talked to us about how much she enjoyed it and how important she thought it was.

I think from my mother's attitude I was open to attend the homebirth. After that, nothing else made sense to me for a normal healthy woman.
post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by secretresistance
At nineteen, I found myself in a many-days-late-no-period-in-sight situation. I can still remember so clearly, the feeling of possibly being a mother, realizing what a child I still was, how selfish I could still be. I knew that I wanted to be a different parent than either of mine were, I knew that I wanted to be devoted to my child first and foremost.

Somehow, I figured that if I [biggest avoider of pain, ever!] could commit myself to not blotting out the pain just because I could, that it would be a big first step towards being the selfless and giving parent/person that I desired to be. So I googled it and found my way to MDC, and the rest is history.

I've been an avid lurker since, and have become an irreparable birth/kid/ap/nfl enthusiast.

Oh yeah, I wasn't pregnant back when I was nineteen, but I am now! Somehow, I've been able to get over my posting shyness to participate, now that I'm an official [kind of] mama.

That moment so long ago was so surreally illuminating. I feel so grateful for that pregnancy 'scare,' it led me to so much learning and really, an enormous shift of my worldview.

Awesome story!
post #40 of 49
Aww, thanks!
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