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my dog bit my 19m old son (pics) - Page 2

post #21 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by its_our_family
I hope you can place him.

Removing his canine teeth will only give him a reason to show aggression in a different way.
And what way would that be? Spreading rumors? Excluding me from his social life?
post #22 of 106
Well, scratching is one way.

ETA: I also don't find this very funny. Your dog pierced your baby's nose. That's very very scary.
post #23 of 106
Yeah, I'm actually shocked by the damage the dog did. And very surprised the dog hasn't already been put down.

ETA - This doesn't sound like something that would be solved by removal of some teeth. It sounds like what you said it was, dominance and/or possession aggression. Which is not a physical issue. Something is seriously wrong with the dog's temperment and/or the dynamic in the house between the dog and the people. It sounds like you have been aware of and working on this, and still this has happened.

I don't think there is any going back from this incident. At least, no way would there be for me.
post #24 of 106
Well, I'm not sure how it will make him show aggresion in other ways, but I can tell you it won't solve the problem. I've worked more than a few protection dogs who had no canines-Bedlam has no canines but she can do some serious damage to the things she chews on constantly.
In small dogs it's actualy thought that most of the damage comes from their front teeth, they are small so they are razor sharp, even into adulthood.
On removing the canines causing different kinds of aggresion--Bedlam has now had all of her canines removed. She broke 3 of them, when we removed the third we saw that the last remaining one was worn thin so we pulled it too--it didn't change her personality though--she was a big fat wuss and she still is.
But like I said, a dog can still do tons of damage even without canines--how much less isn't a chance I'd be willing to bet my kid's face on.
post #25 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenOfThePride
And what way would that be? Spreading rumors? Excluding me from his social life?

Well, there is the obvious peeing and pooping. WOuldn't that be a pleasant smelling home...ick!

There is head butting. (I had a friend who had a dog that did that...it was not fun)

There is still biting. No canine teeth doesn't mean no biting, just without piercing.

Growling

Snipping

Teeth exposing (snarling)

Scratching...which could be jsut as hazardous as biting.

The point is that a dog that shows agression isn't a good combo for a young child even if you keep them away from each other. An animal can still attack no matter what you do.

Removing a dog's teeth will make him more aggressive, jsut in different ways.
post #26 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathryn
Well, scratching is one way.

ETA: I also don't find this very funny. Your dog pierced your baby's nose. That's very very scary.
Some people make jokes when they are stressed, we all deal with stress differently. I've been known to crack some pretty good ones at funerals, while I bled out after a d&c, and during the demise of a number of my beloved pets--it doesn't mean I don't care, I just deal with it differently.
post #27 of 106
Megan, I see what you're trying to get at--but dog behavior doesn't work that way--taking away one an aspect of aggresion does not cause a different aspect to appear. If he was a biter before, he will likely still show aggresion that way--just like I said above--perhaps with less damage--the question is would the 'less damage' be worth the risk--in my opinion, no.
post #28 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by shannon0218
Some people make jokes when they are stressed, we all deal with stress differently. I've been known to crack some pretty good ones at funerals, while I bled out after a d&c, and during the demise of a number of my beloved pets--it doesn't mean I don't care, I just deal with it differently.
All fine and dandy, but I don't believe that the situation is being taken in the serious manner it should be.
post #29 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by shannon0218
Megan, I see what you're trying to get at--but dog behavior doesn't work that way--taking away one an aspect of aggresion does not cause a different aspect to appear. If he was a biter before, he will likely still show aggresion that way--just like I said above--perhaps with less damage--the question is would the 'less damage' be worth the risk--in my opinion, no.
I've had dogs do just what Megan is talking about. I worked with animals too.
post #30 of 106
Dogs do not react out of spite, you will not find any certified behaviorist tell you they think things out like this. It's been researched to the end of the world, when you break the issue down, you can always find another reason.
Dogs are not capable of deciding "well I'm mad at you because you removed my teeth so I'm gonna head but you instead" to say they are would lend creadence to the old male argument against neutering " he'll get mad at me" if a dog can loose his testicles or even a leg without deciding to become aggresive, why would removing his teeth be any different--and if it is different--why do we not suddenly see other aggresion issues in dogs post dentistry when teeth have been removed? Havoc lost 6 teeth and half of his lower jaw due to an infection, it didn't change his personality, he was stable then, he's stable now. This dog is unstable and will likely still be unstable after having his teeth removed.
post #31 of 106
Thread Starter 
Only the dog's canine teeth caused puncture wounds. The incisors only left scratches.

>>Well, there is the obvious peeing and pooping. WOuldn't that be a pleasant smelling home...ick!

Dogs do not pee and poop out of aggression!

>>There is head butting. (I had a friend who had a dog that did that...it was not fun)

I don't think my dog would suddenly think of this.

>>There is still biting. No canine teeth doesn't mean no biting, just without piercing.

Right.

>>Growling

Did I say "I want to cure my dog's growling by removing his canine teeth." ?

>>Snipping

Biting?

>>Teeth exposing (snarling)

Goodnes, I wish he would do that instead of just biting!

>>Scratching...which could be jsut as hazardous as biting.

I don't think he would suddenly think of this now.

>>Removing a dog's teeth will make him more aggressive, jsut in different ways.

Please state your proven resources for this assertion.

I am nowhere near foolish enough to believe that aggression can be cured with tooth removal. But my DH was totally serious about divorcing me if I get the dog euthanized.
post #32 of 106
I think there is less disagreement here than there seems to be. I haven't heard anyone say the dog will get "mad" and strategize another plan of attack. What I'm hearing everyone say is that an aggressive dog will continue to be an aggressive dog, with or without canine teeth.
post #33 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathryn
All fine and dandy, but I don't believe that the situation is being taken in the serious manner it should be.
The op is obviously very upset. In most states and provinces this dog can not be legally put down until he's done the quarentine (7 or 10 days depending on locale) What more would you have her do?? The dog is out of the house, away from her son and she cracked a joke--this means she's not taking things seriously???
None of us is currently in the OP's shoes and it's unlikely that shitting on her for cracking a joke in a time of stress is going to help anyone.

As I said, in most states and provinces the OP would not LEGALLY be allowed to do anything more yet.
post #34 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenOfThePride

I am nowhere near foolish enough to believe that aggression can be cured with tooth removal. But my DH was totally serious about divorcing me if I get the dog euthanized.
It seems to me that your dh values his nekkid flirtatious friend over his wife and his dog over his child. Something is not right with his priorities. I hope you will be assertive enough to protect your child.
post #35 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenOfThePride

Dogs do not pee and poop out of aggression!

You are kidding right??

You obviously didn't know Leroy. But he didn't pee out of aggression. He peed out of revenge. Mock me if you wish. He was my dog. I laid in his piss. I put on clothes covered in piss.

That dog hated me

---------------------------------

Of course your dog nearly mutilated your sons nose... you would know more about a dog's agression than .
post #36 of 106
I snipped this post of yours, QOTP, because I wanted to address these points.

Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenOfThePride
Dogs do not pee and poop out of aggression!

>>Removing a dog's teeth will make him more aggressive, jsut in different ways.

Please state your proven resources for this assertion.

I am nowhere near foolish enough to believe that aggression can be cured with tooth removal. But my DH was totally serious about divorcing me if I get the dog euthanized.
My sister very definitely had a dog that peed & pooped out of aggression. He was a dachsund & thought he was the alpha male. When my sister would take him outside he would not pee, then when she would finally bring him back in, he'd pee on their good couch, while my sister stood right there.

I do not have any proven resources that a dog will be more aggressive if you remove his teeth, but it makes so much sense. He will not be able to pierce the skin, but he could still get a heck of a grip on a little arm or leg. NOT something to risk in my opinion.

You said your DH would divorce you if you get the dog euthanisized? I hope you tell him not to let the door hit him in the butt on his way out. What foolishness.
post #37 of 106
Quote:
You obviously didn't know Leroy. But he didn't pee out of aggression. He peed out of revenge. Mock me if you wish. He was my dog. I laid in his piss. I put on clothes covered in piss.

That dog hated me
IOF!!
post #38 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenOfThePride
I am nowhere near foolish enough to believe that aggression can be cured with tooth removal. But my DH was totally serious about divorcing me if I get the dog euthanized.

See, I was under the impression that I was my child's advocate. If that meant a spouse that cared more for a dog than my child....
post #39 of 106
Thread Starter 
Yeah, the dog is under quarantine at the animal shelter where I just got hired today. I got to go see him and he sat on my lap for half an hour while I talked to the manager about scheduling me in and what my jobs will be. We are so broke that she is letting me work off the costs of his quarantine, and then hiring me on for pay. Some of my previous suggestions to her about the cats with the URIs are actually working out pretty good.
post #40 of 106
Yeah, I was gonna say it before--but your dh is hardly in the position right now to be throwing threats around.
Not that I would normally advocate lying to a spouse, but can you tell him you placed the dog and put him down? In all seriousness, I would be concerned about this dog in a rescue situation--you can place him without children, but it's pretty hard to guarentee the dog will never come in contact with a child--new owners tend to be lulled into a false sense of security--especially if much of the aggresion was towards a child, when children are out of the picture they figure they "fixed" the unfixable dog adn then let their guard down.
Ask your dh how he will feel if he picks up the paper to see a kid with a badly injured face and it was this dog who did the damage?
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