or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bratz Dolls? - Page 2

post #21 of 149
I am no fan of Bratz dolls either. I would ask the parents first because you don't want to waste your money for one thing! My daughter got a few when she turned 5 from one of my aunts and they went straight to Goodwill.
I really have a problem supporting the company because I find it disturbing that the Baby Bratz are so sexualized. It creeps me out and I don't like adding to any problem of girls being sexualized at younger and younger ages...kind of goes with my dislike for The Limited Too selling thongs in my 6 year olds size.
I am not a big fan of Barbie either because of the unrealistic portrayal to young girls....no girl could ever look like Barbie...but I think they are a bit better...though not by much...We were able to find a Barbie with a bit smaller chest than she once had...I think I read something awhile back about Barbie having a breast reduction!
My daughter LOVES the Groovy Girls as well, and they are pretty inexpensive. I think they are a bit too focused on changing clothes and going to parties, giggling etc...but they seem to be a bit more tame...and "wholesome".

Anyway, I would definately check with the parents, or just pick up something else if you want to be safe.



Just thought I would add to the opinion poll.
post #22 of 149
I personally can't stand Bratz dolls. They represent a life-style that we don't think is worth modeling, especially by little girls. My girls don't watch TV and they don't have friends that have Bratz, so they haven't asked for them. I would never buy one and if we got one as a gift I would throw it away. DH and I work very hard to surround our girls with positive role models, and I don't think that my 4 year old is going to benefit by playing with a teenager-looking doll that is all about sex appeal. No thanks.

There are other dolls that are more appropriate for little girls, I think. I don't really like Barbie, but I saw that Barbie has a new like of cute dolls out called Wee Three Friends (or something like that) that seemed more oriented toward younger girls. Groovy girls are nice because they are widely available and are one less piece of plastic coming into your home.

Just some ideas.
post #23 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolnMa
I don't have a problem with them at all. My daughter has two. There is no way that a doll could make my daughter do anything or act in any particular way. She makes the choices about who she wants to be, not her toys.
Don't you think, though, that the toys you give your child send messages about cultural norms? That a child could get ideas about what is expected of women and girls in our cultural from the toys she plays with? I don't think that a doll has some magical ability to turn a girl into something she's not. But I think it's part of the package of media messages about femininity. She is sure to get exposed to these messages eventually living in this country, but I feel a big responsibility to be the bearer of alternative messages. And Bratz dolls, to me, send a pretty obnoxiously mainstream message about femininity (and, as pp have mentioned, it is a message that is waaaay older than the 5-6 year old girls who are nuts about these dolls).

I hate these dolls and would never buy them for anyone. Ny niece is really into them and wanted them for her birthday, and we got her this set of cool paper dolls instead (well, they weren't paper exactly.... it's hard to explain, they are thick cardboard and come with scraps of fabric, bricabrac, glitter and whatnot to make clothes). She loves the gift, and I felt like we were able to find a happy medium. I like Groovy Girls, too.
post #24 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndiG

Little girls do like to model after things. Giving a Bratz doll to a really young child encourages age inappropriate behaviour modelling in my opinon.

And you are definately entitled to your opinion, but obviously not every girl is being encouraged to do anything inappropriate from a Bratz doll. My own daughter and her friend have felt no pressure or influence to be like a Bratz doll. I think it can go both ways, and depends on how a girl has been raised up to getting the doll.
post #25 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by tara
Don't you think, though, that the toys you give your child send messages about cultural norms? That a child could get ideas about what is expected of women and girls in our cultural from the toys she plays with?
Well, yea she could get a lot of ideas but that's not a concern. Ideas are a good thing. We discuss stuff. Everything from clothing, to how we define real beauty, to expressing ourselves through our clothes, make-up, self-esteem, media depictions of women (and men), sexuality, and so on.

My Dd (12) would actually wear some of the clothes that Bratz dolls wear. She would also wear a sweatshirt and jeans and no make-up. She likes to knit, sew, skateboard, cook, and play the drums. I think she is a lovely, strong, charming, intelligent female not afraid to be who she is. Bratz dolls are a toy she enjoys playing with, not the only image of womanhood she thinks there can ever be.

post #26 of 149
Hey, Unschool - your daughter is a bit older than the other girls mentioned in this thread, no? I think it makes a difference if we're talking about a 5 year old girl or a 11 or 12 year old who has more years of deconstructing social messages behind her...
post #27 of 149
Cross post!
post #28 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolnMa
I don't have a problem with them at all. My daughter has two. There is no way that a doll could make my daughter do anything or act in any particular way. She makes the choices about who she wants to be, not her toys.
Whether the dolls are good or bad is irrelevant, IMO. The OP is asking if this is a controversial gift and if her niece's parents might not appreciate it. I think you know that many parents object to these dolls. Are you recommending that she disregard this and just risk giving an inappropriate gift? I mean, I know your personal stand on this as you follow TLC, but what is your opinion about whether she should give this gift or not?
post #29 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by tara
Hey, Unschool - your daughter is a bit older than the other girls mentioned in this thread, no? I think it makes a difference if we're talking about a 5 year old girl or a 11 or 12 year old who has more years of deconstructing social messages behind her...
My daughter had her first Bratz doll at 6, and she has NEVER expressed a desire to wear make-up or be a prostitute. Furthermore, the dolls we have gotten her are dressed really cute, nothing that I wouldn't let her wear. One has an evening gown type dress which is quite long, another a ski outfit which is really cute and another one a blue jeans outfit. All of which are modest AND trendy/fashionable. But yet, my daughter doesn't dress like them, and the clothes she picks out are nothing like what her Bratz dolls have.

Honestly, I think some of you guys read waaaay too much into things that are a lot more simple than you make it out to be.
post #30 of 149
I'll say it again: I don't think a doll has some magical ability to make a child be something she is not. I think it is part of a package of cultural messages and I choose to provide alternative messages (seeing as the mainstream message bombards you from everywhere else). That's all.
post #31 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by tara
Hey, Unschool - your daughter is a bit older than the other girls mentioned in this thread, no? I think it makes a difference if we're talking about a 5 year old girl or a 11 or 12 year old who has more years of deconstructing social messages behind her...

That's true she is a bit older now, but she got her first Bratz doll at 9. Even at age 6 we could have talked about all that. It's probably important for me to note that we don't "forbid" any certain brand or kind of toy in our family. So that means if we can financially do it, and they want it, so be it. I realize that not every family works that way though, and I can respect that.
post #32 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubyWild
Whether the dolls are good or bad is irrelevant, IMO. The OP is asking if this is a controversial gift and if her niece's parents might not appreciate it. I think you know that many parents object to these dolls. Are you recommending that she disregard this and just risk giving an inappropriate gift? I mean, I know your personal stand on this as you follow TLC, but what is your opinion about whether she should give this gift or not?
You are right! My apologies to the OP for misunderstanding the original question. Listen to me just all lol.

Personally? Unless I had some sort of hint or idea that it would be a problem I wouldn't think twice about buying a girl a Bratz doll. I have bought a few for some girls in my life. If the OP has any concerns though, I would just ask the child's mother before hand as a courtesy.
post #33 of 149
Quote:
I think they are not nice over all. For one they are called 'Bratz', not really something I want my daughter aspiring to become , they wear clothes made for club-hopping and prostitutes and makeup. The "Baby Bratz" wear bottles which is majorly offensive to me overall. I think they promote a lot of nasty stuff I wouldn't want my daughter knowing or seeing.
post #34 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolnMa
I don't have a problem with them at all. My daughter has two. There is no way that a doll could make my daughter do anything or act in any particular way. She makes the choices about who she wants to be, not her toys.
This is how I tend to feel. Granted, my dd isn't yet two, so we haven't gotten to these yet, but I agree with the general sentiment expressed here.
post #35 of 149
Quote:
My Dd (12) would actually wear some of the clothes that Bratz dolls wear. She would also wear a sweatshirt and jeans and no make-up. She likes to knit, sew, skateboard, cook, and play the drums. I think she is a lovely, strong, charming, intelligent female not afraid to be who she is. Bratz dolls are a toy she enjoys playing with, not the only image of womanhood she thinks there can ever be.
Right on. Dolls are for imaginative play and pretend. Don't little girls play and pretend with any doll they have? Isn't playing dress up the same thing? Come on don't you remember being a little girl and playing in mom's makeup...Putting on her pearls....Heels...and clothes? It's no difference. DH and I were just discussing recently that when DD gets old enough to go shopping with he didn't care if we tried on "Clothes you would absolutely NEVER wear and laugh". My mom and I did this. Spandex tube dresses, trampy schoolgirl outfits, raunchy looking thing bikinis. It was fun. Did I ever go out like that HE** NO. Was it fun pretending? Yes and bonding with my mom. A doll is a doll..Barbie..Bratz..or Strawberry Shortcake. They play pretend with them no matter what age they are. Does it define who they are or who they will be when they get older. NO!!! As I stated earlier regarding the OP. It is contraversial enough that I would leave it up to the parents to buy a doll like that. I also liked others that responded by saying to get the parents permission. We tell our DC not to get wrapped up in stuff yet we are doing it here..HUMMMMMM.
post #36 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zombiewaif
Right on. Dolls are for imaginative play and pretend. Don't little girls play and pretend with any doll they have? Isn't playing dress up the same thing? Come on don't you remember being a little girl and playing in mom's makeup...Putting on her pearls....Heels...and clothes? It's no difference. DH and I were just discussing recently that when DD gets old enough to go shopping with he didn't care if we tried on "Clothes you would absolutely NEVER wear and laugh". My mom and I did this. Spandex tube dresses, trampy schoolgirl outfits, raunchy looking thing bikinis. It was fun. Did I ever go out like that HE** NO. Was it fun pretending? Yes and bonding with my mom. A doll is a doll..Barbie..Bratz..or Strawberry Shortcake. They play pretend with them no matter what age they are. Does it define who they are or who they will be when they get older. NO!!! As I stated earlier regarding the OP. It is contraversial enough that I would leave it up to the parents to buy a doll like that. I also liked others that responded by saying to get the parents permission. We tell our DC not to get wrapped up in stuff yet we are doing it here..HUMMMMMM.

Well spoken.
post #37 of 149
Hate 'em

They send the absolute wrong message to all girls. IMHO

The cool thing is, my dd hates them too. She says they scare her with their heads! She's 10.5

Here is a brat doll. Just love the Oh La La name!!?!?!


Here is a My Scene Barbie. Check out the halter top. Unbelievable.

Click on the My scene doll and really check out that outfit.

To the OP - I wouldn't get it.
post #38 of 149
I took a really good look at a Bratz doll in a store after reading another thread that was bashing them. I decided that I think they're kinda cute, in a big head, big eyed sort of way.

I'm the type who thinks it's ridiculous to assume a little girl who plays with dolls such as those is internalizing negative ideas about herself. She's playing with a doll. Besides, most kids I've known strip off their dolls clothes first thing. Secondly, so many teenaged and adult women wear make-up that the little girls would probably not even think about it.

That's about it. I don't even know why I posted. I don't really have much opinion on this.

to the op, I'd ask the mom first before giving it as a gift. No point in being forever shunned if the parents are opposed to them.

~Nay
post #39 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by tara
Don't you think, though, that the toys you give your child send messages about cultural norms?

No, I honestly don't. Since most people don't dress like a Bratz doll I'm sure my son (no girls yet) would be able to figure out that the doll is the exception to the norm, not the norm.

~Nay
post #40 of 149
While our toys do not define our children...

* I don't need one more influence on my kids telling them to be more grown up than they already are.

* I don't need one more influence on my children emphasizing female sexuality as a power to be sought after and exploited

* I don't need anything else emphasizing the sexualization of children

It's on TV, it's in magazines, billboards, now there are books written for young tweens/teens that discuss sex graphically!

Why would I encourage my 6yo cousin to consider seeing herself or any other girl her age as sexual. She already covets make up, which her mother won't even let her PRETEND to wear, like it is the holy freaking grail- and yet she is a huge fan and owner of many Bratz paraphrenalia. Confusing? I think so.

I think these dolls emphasize traits in women that are not positive, and they expose girls to aspects of womanhood they do not have the framework for, they are not mature enough to integrate or be responsible for.

And I'm sorry... the babies have *french cut panties*.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Childhood Years