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The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe (The Movie) - Page 2

post #21 of 50
umbrella - have you read the book. I really think the down played the battle scenes.
post #22 of 50
Dd (almost 9) and I were both disappointed.

I have tried to raise dd without the push for violence on everything these days. I want her to see violence as it truly is, not entertainment. This movie, imo, ranked very near the same violence level as Lord of the Rings. During the violent scenes, all dd could do was frown and say a worried "ohhhh". I told her she didn't have to watch it, we could leave, but she decided to stay. Her friend was with us and was enjoying it so she didn't want to spoil it for her. Afterwards, her friend LOVED it, but dd was just quiet. I wished I didn't take them.

For me, it was not only too violent and intense, it had some bad messages imo.... for example, it's okay to trap and poison a child as long as "the devil/witch made you do it". Then, to top it off, the child will quickly forgive you, feel sorry for you, become your loyal friend for it and you will then be one of the favored characters/heros. I just couldn't believe that they got away with that victim-scenario in a children's movie, and played by a child no less! Scary.
post #23 of 50
Quote:
For me, it was not only too violent and intense, it had some bad messages imo.... for example, it's okay to trap and poison a child as long as "the devil/witch made you do it". Then, to top it off, the child will quickly forgive you, feel sorry for you, become your loyal friend for it and you will then be one of the favored characters/heros. I just couldn't believe that they got away with that victim-scenario in a children's movie, and played by a child no less! Scary.
That's where the Christian allegory part plays in. Grace , mercy and forgiveness.

I actually got all teary eyed at that part. That a small child who has been nearly kidnapped would be so forgiving and tender and show mercy and grace.
post #24 of 50
Quote:
I just couldn't believe that they got away with that victim-scenario in a children's movie, and played by a child no less! Scary.
vs.

Quote:
That's where the Christian allegory part plays in. Grace , mercy and forgiveness.

I actually got all teary eyed at that part. That a small child who has been nearly kidnapped would be so forgiving and tender and show mercy and grace.
Wow - both good points! The really hard part in life is to be able to tell what is appropriate when. - Lillian
post #25 of 50
I took my son to see this (4 yrs) on Christmas Eve. I have mixed feelings. I enjoyed so many of the special effects and it really captured his attention almost the whole time but I feel that it was very intense with lots of violence in it.
I would not recommend taking children to see this until they are a bit older (9 or 10). Just my humble opinion.
post #26 of 50
I was disturbed just that she went off to his home so willingly. what was she thinking .. . did her mother teach her nothing?

but also he didn't kidnap her. he redeemed himself by sending her home and telling her not to come back. h confessed and refused to be a part of the witches scheme. and paid a high price for it.

and remember, this is sorta a fairy tale . . .
post #27 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyka
I was disturbed just that she went off to his home so willingly. what was she thinking .. . did her mother teach her nothing?

but also he didn't kidnap her. he redeemed himself by sending her home and telling her not to come back. h confessed and refused to be a part of the witches scheme. and paid a high price for it.

and remember, this is sorta a fairy tale . . .
I agree. I confess, I only read the book because we are homeschoolers, it's not normally my cup of tea, classics and all that However, we thoroughly enjoyed the book this past summer and the movie. And, it is a fantasy.

It is disturbing that so much literature contains such violence, but history was quite a violent place. We try to keep it in perspective and also do a lot of talking.
post #28 of 50
We saw the movie. I thought it was incredibly violent for a child's movie! My 9 and a half year old was fine with it, but I would not show a movie with this much violence to a 4,5,or 6 year old. My three year old slept. We planned to go during his nap time.

With all that being said I really liked the movie but didn't love it. 4 out of 5 stars.
post #29 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jen123
I've seen it twice. Loved it. Most of my church family has seen it also.

Allow me to ask a question.....

CSLewis wrote the series as an allegory to Christianity. I went last night to see the movie again with a lady who is not a Christian. She really wanted to see the movie. When it was over I asked her " do you think that was a Christian movie?" and she said she didn't think it was , but it could be if you looked for it.

Thoughts?
To me the parallel between Aslan and Christ is obvious (most people at least know the basics of the story of Jesus's crucifixion and resurection.) But the rest of it seemed like just a good story that anyone with generally accepted values could have written -- being true to one's destiny, being brave, caring for others, good vs. evil, etc. I grew up in a strongly Christian, Bible-centered home, and I still couldn't see much in the way of allegory beyond the concept of Aslan taking the place of Edmund who for some reason (based on the "deep magic") "deserved" to be killed. Actually, I think this could be a turn-off for non-Christians who are looking for the allegory. If the creator of the deep magic is supposed to be God, then it seems pretty harsh of this God to have such a rule in place. But I have to admit, it fits as an allegory. The God of the Bible can seem to be harsh sometimes too.
post #30 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by mother_sunshine
Dd (almost 9) and I were both disappointed.

I have tried to raise dd without the push for violence on everything these days. I want her to see violence as it truly is, not entertainment. This movie, imo, ranked very near the same violence level as Lord of the Rings. During the violent scenes, all dd could do was frown and say a worried "ohhhh". I told her she didn't have to watch it, we could leave, but she decided to stay. Her friend was with us and was enjoying it so she didn't want to spoil it for her. Afterwards, her friend LOVED it, but dd was just quiet. I wished I didn't take them.

For me, it was not only too violent and intense, it had some bad messages imo.... for example, it's okay to trap and poison a child as long as "the devil/witch made you do it". Then, to top it off, the child will quickly forgive you, feel sorry for you, become your loyal friend for it and you will then be one of the favored characters/heros. I just couldn't believe that they got away with that victim-scenario in a children's movie, and played by a child no less! Scary.

Yes, Lucy going with Mr. Tumnus so quickly was, uh, interesting...faun or not

My dd is still talking about it and how scary it was. She has read Harry Potter and even seen some of the films...but she felt 'Narnia' was scarier. I think some of it went over Ben's head, but I regret taking him and hope some of those images have left him.
post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jen123
That's where the Christian allegory part plays in. Grace , mercy and forgiveness.
I haven't seen this movie, but these values are not uniquely Christian.
post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by benjalo
I haven't seen this movie, but these values are not uniquely Christian.
Oh! I know that! I hope I didn't imply that they were. CSLewis was a christian and wrote it from that point of view. It was written as a Christian allegory. That's why I brought it up.

The scene with Lucy forgiving Mr.Tomnus was supposed to show mercy grace and forgiveness. ( that's what my Christian friend told me)
post #33 of 50
Actually Lewis was very clear that this was not an allagory. It is a suposition. as in suppose a place like narnia existed and suppose it needed redeeming. how do you suppose it would it look in that world. It was never intended to be an allagory. but he did intend for Aslan to be the Christ figure and the Emoror across the Sea is God.

carry on . . . .
post #34 of 50
Quote:
My 5 y/o liked it, but my 10 y/o and I left the theater for the Aslan scene. It was terribly sad and frightening!! I still can't believe that was in a (marketed) children's movie.
That scene was important to the book, many events in the book led up to it.
post #35 of 50
My apologies. I stand corrected.

I just found this: Did C.S. Lewis Create Narnia as an Allegory?

http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/Dumm...e/id-3206.html

Fascinating. And a bit odd.
post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by phathui5
That scene was important to the book, many events in the book led up to it.
plathius~ I realize that. Visually, my dd and I found it quite terrifying. I was sad, but also angry at the White Witch. I could never watch Passion of the Christ, either. We read the books awhile ago and weren't prepared for the scene being big screened. The movie also moved quite a bit faster than the books, making the jumps more abrupt for us. Dd is quite sensitive (as is Ben) and I feel I should have viewed the movie first or just not taken them. My poor judgement.
post #37 of 50
There are a lot of movies that we watch before we let ds see them, for the reasons you mentioned.
post #38 of 50
jen - sorry if I sounded snarky. that was not my intention. people get mad because as an allagory it is not a very good one. also I think it is cool as a jenre? to have supposition. It would be a fun way to write that I never learned about in school. So I think it is cool.
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom4tot
Yes, Lucy going with Mr. Tumnus so quickly was, uh, interesting...faun or not

My dd is still talking about it and how scary it was. She has read Harry Potter and even seen some of the films...but she felt 'Narnia' was scarier. I think some of it went over Ben's head, but I regret taking him and hope some of those images have left him.
I can't resist saying....
Hi Joan!!

FWIW, dd and I LOVE Harry Potter. (We didn't read any of the books, she's not there yet , but we both loved the movies.) Though there is violence, it didn't compare to the violence/torture and intensity of Narnia. It wasn't killing for the sake of killing and hating for the sake of hating.
post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by mother_sunshine
I can't resist saying....
Hi Joan!!

FWIW, dd and I LOVE Harry Potter. (We didn't read any of the books, she's not there yet , but we both loved the movies.) Though there is violence, it didn't compare to the violence/torture and intensity of Narnia. It wasn't killing for the sake of killing and hating for the sake of hating.
Michelle

Yes, that's exactly it.

As far as not seeing it before we took the kids, I think we got a little over exicted with it being the holiday (we saw it the week before Christmas). The kids saw the trailer and Ben was eager to see it.
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