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Family Cloth...what nobody ever told you - Page 16

post #301 of 440
We've been using FC for about a year now. Well, dd and I do anyway, dh still uses tp. Dd and I love it though. It feels so much nicer than sand paper feeling scotts which is the only thing that works with our septic tank.

I keep a honey bear bottle of wipes solution next to our wipes so we can wet the wipes as needed.

This site has tons of wipes recipes to choose from. I just use the dr. bronners one myself.
http://www.zany-zebra.com/cloth-wipe-solution.shtml
post #302 of 440
Oh, and for the person who mentioned that their cloths have rolled up .... mine did too, I simply turned them up in a basket so now we grab a "tube" and unroll it before we use it. Saved me the hassle of fighting with it and I think it actually looks neat in the basket like that.
post #303 of 440
Just bumping this thread back into life with an update. I had switched over to Family Cloth in the fall/winter. DH & Ds very unsure and didn't seem to like the idea of mommy's poo cloths :eyeroll

BUT just last week, DH announced he is on board with family cloth and loves it!!! DS came over to cloth earlier in spring because that's was the only thing I stocked in our upstairs bathroom and then he loved it too. We are now a family cloth family!!! WOOhOOO!!!!!
post #304 of 440
Congrats, yay for converts!
post #305 of 440

We love cloth

We switched over to cloth last fall, initially inspired by the wonderful women at lunapads. We've cut apart some old flannel sheets into squares and have them in a small basket by the toilet. Next to it is a cute wooden jar with a lid that we line with a plastic bread bag for used wipes. We squirt the used wipe pile with vinegar/water in a spray bottle after each 'deposit'.

yes, some -ok, many - friends think we've tipped into wacko-land. but really - what could be better than soft flannel? it feels divine y'all.

I love the idea of using a wipes solution - thank you!

and yes, we wash them on hot in a separate load. And we now have enough wipes that this only needs to happen twice a month...

glad to know we're in some very good company
post #306 of 440
wow!! this is an awesome idea. pee is sterile so no problem putting that in the laundry. i think i'll skip the #2 for now, but try using cloth for #1. we have piles of flannel receiving blankets that we are not using any more. I have used cloth for menstrual pads for 15 years and i would never do it any other way. we are down to our last roll of tp, so i guess this is the day to start! LOL
post #307 of 440
I love this idea! Since I started cloth diapering my daughter, this seems like such an obvious and easy thing to do. Our diapering set up is in the bathroom, so it's super convenient to just toss the wipes in with the diapers. I've done it when short on tp (just like you CalmCenter, good time to start indeed! ). This thread is inspiring me to do it more often and more intentionally. I'm glad to have seen this thread in the recent newsletter. Very inspiring. Thanks!
post #308 of 440
I am SOO happy I found this post... I started doing this about 2 years ago and people thought I was weird. My boyfriend was so bothered that I quit doing it for awhile but I'm totally whipping them out again! I like using really old flannel its SO soft.. great for blowing yer nose as well.
post #309 of 440
Totally did not read this whole post but, how about it was DH that let the cat out of the bag with our friends on what the purpose of all the cloth wipes next to the toilet is! He was initally so reluctant...but he got hooked on the wet wipes and it was only a matter of time before he made the switch. We do get teased quite a bit though.

My family still has no idea. They will once my kids start asking questions about where the real TP is!
post #310 of 440
yeah, it is the big secret around here. LOL
post #311 of 440
We're switching to family cloth very soon. My dh doesn't know it but we are running out of toilet paper so...

He's gotten used to cloth wipes and me using a cloth pad once in awhile, I'm sure he'll adjust. Helps that he's not squemish
post #312 of 440
We just got a diaper sprayer that attaches to the toilet water line and DH and I LOVE it. I got behind on the laundry this week and we had to use toilet paper. YUCK!
post #313 of 440

Is it really more environmentally friendly?

Hi there, sorry if this has already been covered, but it's such a long thread....

I think this is a really interesting idea, and I like to waste as little as I possibly can. But my one concern is all the electricity and water used to wash the cloths. After all, TP is infinitely more biodegradable than a diaper, even better if its non-bleached, recycled TP. And we are talking high temperature washes here.

Any ideas on this?

Thanks!
post #314 of 440
Martin18 - I think its how you are washing them and if you are combining loads.

For my house - we still have 1 kiddo in cloth diapers, so often we are washing our 1 load a week of CD with any cloth wipes from the bathrooms. For us - its significantly less impact. Once we have the kid out of CDs I anticipate they will just get tossed in with our towels and such since there is very little to none fecal matter ever on them, or just held until enough justify a load of wash.

We have lots of cloth wipes (we use and seek out old flannel sheets and such) so within a week I think we might use maybe 1/3 of our supply of cloths (its a bonus of living with all boys in a house).
post #315 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by martin18 View Post
Hi there, sorry if this has already been covered, but it's such a long thread....

I think this is a really interesting idea, and I like to waste as little as I possibly can. But my one concern is all the electricity and water used to wash the cloths. After all, TP is infinitely more biodegradable than a diaper, even better if its non-bleached, recycled TP. And we are talking high temperature washes here.

Any ideas on this?

Thanks!
Manufacturing toilet paper is far from a water- and electricity-free process. Consider all the fuel required to log a forest, transport it to the sawyer (often hundreds or more miles away), do the sawyering, transport it again (hundreds or thousands of miles) to a facility which does I don't even know what to make toilet paper.

And consider throwing a few extra cloths into your towel load, probably not even generating an extra load. (It doesn't for me).

You don't have to throw it in the dryer either, feel free to hang to dry.

I also have a high efficiency washing machine. The materials it came with said it uses about the same amount of water as washing your hands. Well, even if they are exaggerating, family cloth is hardly a large volume of things to wash, it certainly does not increase my laundy load at all. You would be better served to save two bath towels a week, and I don't hear anybody jumping up and down about that.

As for biodegradability, I don't follow that argument either. Yes, TP will degrade quicker than a piece of cotton, so what? The cotton wipe will degrade pretty fast. But, more, the cotton wipe did not require any extra manufacturing. You make them from what you were going to throw away. How could you make it more environmental than that? Old sheets, t-shirts, etc. (one of ours was an old washcloth with a hole in it, we cut it in half). And we will reuse and reuse and reuse.

Anyway, I think that people just don't think about what the real environmental issues are - they only see the end product and count from there, they don't give any thought to where that product came from and what it took to make it into the finished product, with all its packaging, bleach, waste, fuel, machinery, etc. - not to mention the ancient forests that are being lost every hour (google that for more information - yes, the tissue makers are razing the ancient forests at alarming speeds so we can wipe our tushes). Yes, if you ignore that totally, it's easy to feel fine about throwing away a little piece of tissue that won't be there (except for its chemical residue) in 6 months.
post #316 of 440
Seashells, you're absolutely right about the manufacturing processes.

Laundry - well, I never wash less than a full load (I'm more guilty of over-loading), so for me it would generate extra laundry, be it more, be it less.

Biodegradability - I was just comparing TP to a diaper, which is what we most frequently substitute for cloth, because diapers take years to degrade. I wasn't saying that cloth was less degradable than TP, absolutely not.

It's purely manufacturing vs extra washing and drying, energy plus chemicals. Assuming one uses unbleached TP from recycled sources - anything else is absurd!
post #317 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by martin18 View Post
It's purely manufacturing vs extra washing and drying, energy plus chemicals. Assuming one uses unbleached TP from recycled sources - anything else is absurd!
I'm a big fan of recycling but there's a reason it's the 3rd "R" and not the 1st or 2nd.

Family cloth falls under Reuse, the 2nd "R." Depending on one's wiping habits, one may be able to Reduce as well. (We've had a thread discussing the habits of some people who use a third of a roll of toilet paper for a single poop).

I would rather people use recycled, unbleached TP than the alternative paper TP. But cloth is still better than that. The recycling process is still less earth-friendly than running your (hopefully high-efficiency) washing machine an extra load a week. But I agree that it really shouldn't even be an extra load, the volume of cloth we use is not anywhere close to a load, it's more like throwing in a few extra pairs of socks than anything else. I also am guilty of overloading, but if you were able to actually calculate the extra washing cycles, I believe it would be like an extra load every few months. Nothing compared to even the recycling process, much less the manufacturing process of the conventional TP.

ETA: I forgot to say about energy and chemicals. Energy can be vastly reduced by line drying. Chemicals can also be vastly reduced, and maybe eliminated. I currently only use cloth for pee, and while I do usually use my homemade laundry soap, I'm considering running the wash without it in the future. Even Reader's Digest, hardly a bastion of greeness, was just saying in their latest article that apparently clothes can be washed just fine without any detergent. I make my own soap from pure soap, washing soda and borax. Obviously that has some impact but it's not anywhere near what's in a box of Tide. My point being is that you can control your choices on the family cloth end, but not so much on the toilet paper end. You can't choose to have them spend extra time or cost and cut chemicals or energy (like you can choose to hang your cloth to dry or to wash with your own soap).
post #318 of 440

TP is not biodegradable

as you think if you put it in a plastic trash bag that is closed. That pretty much takes away the 'biodegradability' of anything.

I just started cding and will family and lady cloth as soon as everything is used up. I use receiving blankets, baby wash cloths, old clothing for baby now. I can't wait. The TPers can find their own TP ;o)
post #319 of 440
laohaire (is there a "g" missing?!), you have convinced me!
post #320 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by martin18 View Post
laohaire (is there a "g" missing?!), you have convinced me!
Oh wow! I feel kind of stunned in a happy way

Yes, there is a "g" missing, you are absolutely right. I typed my username in too fast, missed the g, didn't notice it, registered for the site, and now 4 years later I am still g-less.

- Dun Laoghaire, Ireland (pronounced Leery, if I recall correctly - it's been many many years since I was there)
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