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Family Cloth...what nobody ever told you - Page 18

post #341 of 440
I can't believe this thread!!! I haven't read through it all, but I am glad there is so much interest. I wish this would become more common, so I wouldn't feel so weird! A friend told me that her daughter's friend was "so poor, they didn't have toilet paper...they used rags". Now I know that there are more reasons beyond frugality to use "cloth".

I have had a "mini-shower" (I have also seen them called "muslim shower" or "diaper sprayer") attached to my sink (so I can use tepid water) and have used it as a "poor woman's bidet" for years, but I still used toilet paper or disposeable "feminine cloths" to wipe. After finding this thread, I have kept a dry washcloth on a hook beside my toilet and am using it to dry. Easy.

I think using water at the toilet is very common among Muslims. I had an Egyptian boyfriend who always kept a water bottle in the bathroom, and when my baby's father's Turkish mother visited, there was always a water bottle there too. I never inquired about the use of the bottles, but I was curious. I did ask my baby's father about his bathroom in Turkey--but before I got all the answers (do you wash yourself with water and do you drip dry or towel dry), he told me, "You're asking too many questions" so I dropped it.

I LOVE my sprayer!!! I also use it as a diaper sprayer and also to "pressure wash" ground in stains on clothes.

I am so addicted to the water, that using toilet paper when I'm "out and about" seems "icky".

Now, if I can only get my kids on board....
post #342 of 440
"Diaper sprayers" are generally re-purposed hand-held bidets in the first place ... they've just been given a more market-targeted new name. And yes, use among Muslims is nearly universal -- there's a well-known religious recommendation to clean with water, and people have tended to take it pretty seriously. At any rate, for anyone getting by with a peri bottle it really is a worthwhile investment. The Mini-Shower brand is perfectly good; for a little more money you can get ones from Sanicare with metal construction which are less likely to eventually crack. (For a lot more money you can get ones that are gold plated. ) Basically you just want any with a flow regulator valve where it connects to the water line. (I know way too much about this stuff. ) For the money the plastic ones are fine ... the only one I've ever had break personally had a little help from a two year old.
post #343 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquesce View Post
" you just want any with a flow regulator valve where it connects to the water line. (I know way too much about this stuff. ) For the money the plastic ones are fine.
I imagine the flow regulator is important. Our diaper sprayer is a DIY, a kitchen sprayer attached to the toilet water line. The water comes out fast! It's great for spraying diapers but rather more pressure than I'd want on my body.
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post #344 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquesce View Post
"Diaper sprayers" are generally re-purposed hand-held bidets in the first place ... they've just been given a more market-targeted new name. And yes, use among Muslims is nearly universal -- there's a well-known religious recommendation to clean with water, and people have tended to take it pretty seriously. At any rate, for anyone getting by with a peri bottle it really is a worthwhile investment. The Mini-Shower brand is perfectly good; for a little more money you can get ones from Sanicare with metal construction which are less likely to eventually crack. (For a lot more money you can get ones that are gold plated. ) Basically you just want any with a flow regulator valve where it connects to the water line. (I know way too much about this stuff. ) For the money the plastic ones are fine ... the only one I've ever had break personally had a little help from a two year old.
My plastic mini-shower I got about 7 years ago was great. I think I dropped the hand-held part on my tile floor one too many times and about a year ago the button quit working and I re-ordered that piece. After ordering, I wrote the company and told them how happy I was and they told me that the button could have been replaced without me having to get a whole thing. I also had the hose (like aquarium tubing) blow off one time---it is important to release the pressure and they tell you that. They have a new design for the faucet adapter, but my old one is still working fine.

It isn't too much in the way of using my sink faucet, but sometimes it diverts the water when someone turns the water on and I have to show them how to pull the diverter knob out and push it in to get the water coming from where they want. I think everyone should have one. I used the peri-bottle before I got the mini-shower. I LOVE being able to wash during my period at every toilet visit most of all.
post #345 of 440
I'm thinking of getting a mini-shower, but I have a question: how do you get used to the cold? Our house is always cold, and especially in winter I think it could take a lot of nerve to spray myself with ice-cold water. Do you get used to it? Do you still have to work up your nerve?
post #346 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by insahmniak View Post
I'm thinking of getting a mini-shower, but I have a question: how do you get used to the cold? Our house is always cold, and especially in winter I think it could take a lot of nerve to spray myself with ice-cold water. Do you get used to it? Do you still have to work up your nerve?
sometimes the tap cold water is TOOOO COOOOLLLLDDDD. Mine is hooked up to the bathroom faucet not the toilet water supply line, so I usually have it slightly warm--a little cooler than body temp. Too hot is also a very bad thing. I imagine people get used to the cold, as I think that is the more typical way of using it? I know a "real" self-standing bidet has hot and cold water.
post #347 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by insahmniak View Post
I'm thinking of getting a mini-shower, but I have a question: how do you get used to the cold? Our house is always cold, and especially in winter I think it could take a lot of nerve to spray myself with ice-cold water. Do you get used to it? Do you still have to work up your nerve?
Regular cold is in the range of comfortable, IMO. Winter cold pipes kind of cold can be a bit much, but you can let it run a bit just into the toilet (or tub or sink or whatever) until the super chilled water is out of the way.

Not where I'm living now, but my other house has a hot water supply run to the bidet fixture. It can be nice, but believe me, too cold is waaaaay better than accidentally setting it too hot.
post #348 of 440
I can't believe I read the whole thing!
I'm convinced. I'm going to switch. Can somebody talk to me about quantity for getting started? Not sure if I'll get flannel sheets from a thrift store or simply buy some.
I don't have anybody in cloth dipes right now - should I wash the cloth by itself?
post #349 of 440
I'd say the quantity depends on how many are using them, how many you'd use in a day and how often you want to wash them. Maybe start with a dozen a day for yourself? I wash mine with whatever load I'm doing at the time and have no problems with it.
post #350 of 440

Shalom!

 

A few years ago, after hearing about a mission trip to India where the native women don't use toilet paper, but "splash some water on themselves" afterwards to be clean... and after being trained to use a peri-bottle post partum, it occured to me to use a squeeze bottle full of warm water ALL the time, not just during my period to be cleaner. Like a portable bidet. At home I use a cleaned out 24 oz Gatorade bottle that is squishable, with the drinking lid spout that twists open/shut. This gives a nice amount of water pressure, spraying from the front, through the middle. One bottle can last 2-3 months before it start cracking and leaking. Then I just get another Gatorade.

 

My sink is right by the toilet, so I sit down, prop the bottle under the faucet in the sink, turn the water on and it's usally ready about the same time I am. Too hot is definatley bad. I have to remember the water is already too hot when I turn it on if I'm doing laundry.

 

Then I dry with a wash cloth.  Just like getting out of the shower and using a towel to dry off everywhere else, too.

 

I wash those wash clothes with the towels in HOT water. Much nicer than tree pulp.  When I'm not at home, I take a smaller (16-20oz) water bottle with a drinking spout type lid that pops open/shut, fits better under the faucet in the sinks of most public bathrooms. Even when I don't have wash cloths to use, it's so much nicer to be washed clean before using the toilet paper. [I am home most of the time].  I leave the lids off the bottles when I'm home to air out between uses, and let the water drain out of them.

 

I've been doing this for years, but just today heard about "family cloths".  Now I don't feel so alone and weird. Thanks. I'm now also wondering why I never thought of bringing along one to dry myself with when I am out and about. NO tp, no matter where I am.

 

I like to use the CHEAP pack of 12 washclothes that I picked up at Wal-Mart. They aren't too thick. And I don't have to do anything to them. Because I am rinsed clean, I am just using the cloth for dryness. Mine also hangs on a hook in the bathroom. I might need to have a couple out at a time, for a chance for them to dry out (same thing as the handtowels after everybody washes their hands and drys them off, the towels eventually don't absorb much and need time to dry out.) When I'm not niddah (AF) 1-2 wash clothes a week is plenty, since I only have been using them for drying off after rinsing clean from  #1.

 

But after reading through nearly every post on this thread, I'm seriously considering giving up the box of baby wipes and using a damp washcloth for #2. Mutli packs of cheap 12 washcothes or 30 dishclothes are easily picked up.

 

Am also looking to switch to cloth pads for my niddah time. And I'm wondering, how much wiping is actually necessary when I use the restroom for #1 then, since I rinse off well, and am going to still be "wet" from my flow, Will it make that much difference to the absorbancy and amount of time before I have to change the pad again?

 

please, what do the letters "AF" actually stand for? I am guessing from reading this thread it means "during my period" / niddah.

 

Thanks.

post #351 of 440

I've been using a cloth for way over a year. I have a small container with a lid next to the toilet where I put the used cloths. On the other side of the toilet I have a pretty wicker rectangle basket where I keep folded family clothes and also cloth menstrual rags.

 

My question is this..

- how do you store the rags until you wash them? Do you put them in a solution? Or store them dry?

- How many days do you go before you wash them?

 

I fill the container with water and less than a tablespoon of bleach... just like I did with diapers. Do you think the bleach is harmful to my skin? I dump the entire contents into the washer and use the prewash cycle. After they have been prewashed I then dump in my towels to wash them. I felt like the bleach also helps with bacteria.

 

I wondered what you gals thought.

 

Also... did I understand you right.. do some of you use a spray bottle to clean yourself? Do you just use water? Do you have a particular way you spray.. I'm thinking front to back?

post #352 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgene View Post
My question is this..

- how do you store the rags until you wash them? Do you put them in a solution? Or store them dry?

- How many days do you go before you wash them?

 

I store the rags (and used menstrual cloth) in a small wet bag or diaper pail. I store them dry and wash every 2-3 days. I'm still washing diapers, so I just throw them all together. Before my son was born I put used menstrual cloth in a bucket with water and a drop of soap, then washed once a week, but I was prone to forgetting them and they got really nasty. The dry storage in a wet bag is far more pleasant.
 

post #353 of 440


 

 

please, what do the letters "AF" actually stand for? I am guessing from reading this thread it means "during my period" / niddah.

 

Thanks.


Yes.  AF stands for "Aunt Flo", as in, Aunt Flo is visiting.  It's a silly lighthearted way of saying that you have your period.

post #354 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgene View Post

I've been using a cloth for way over a year. I have a small container with a lid next to the toilet where I put the used cloths. On the other side of the toilet I have a pretty wicker rectangle basket where I keep folded family clothes and also cloth menstrual rags.

 

My question is this..

- how do you store the rags until you wash them? Do you put them in a solution? Or store them dry?

- How many days do you go before you wash them?

 

I fill the container with water and less than a tablespoon of bleach... just like I did with diapers. Do you think the bleach is harmful to my skin? I dump the entire contents into the washer and use the prewash cycle. After they have been prewashed I then dump in my towels to wash them. I felt like the bleach also helps with bacteria.

 

I wondered what you gals thought.

 

Also... did I understand you right.. do some of you use a spray bottle to clean yourself? Do you just use water? Do you have a particular way you spray.. I'm thinking front to back?



For a moment I thought you were saying that you had like a peri bottle with water and bleach that you used.  yikes.gif  But I think I get that you put the bleach in the washer, right? 

Our cloth is used for #1/#2 and I have separate cloth pads which I keep elsewhere as I have a house full of boys (they try to make them fly like birds!).  When we wash them -we don't use bleach per se, just some oxiclean, laundry detergent & vinegar (in lieu of fabric softener).   I don't do a pre-wash as I use a diper sprayer for any #2 - so really very little is ever on the cloth.  How often we wash them - well when ever the can gets full, so usually 1xweek.  I'm about to make a larger stash since everyone in the family is now using them more often!

post #355 of 440

The hubby, DS and I all use family cloth.  With all 3 of us using it, it's way more cost effective and a lot easier to use retired or buy cheap t-shirts.  I just cut them up, no worries with hemming them since t-shirt material won't fray and they're easy to replace when needed.

post #356 of 440

I'm going to subscribe to this thread. Have been thinking about trying this for a long time and just couldn't bring myself to invest a bunch of $$$. Just don't have it right now. But we have TONS of extra tshirts that I can cut up! thanks :) I am so going to try it!

post #357 of 440

I haven't read this whole thread but here are my two cents thus far:

For number 2 I fill a peri bottle with warm water and 'wash' off afterwards. So I only use one small square of cloth to pat dry. Unless I am in public then I try to find a restroom with a sink instead of a stall so I can use a moist wipe first.

I just keep everrything in the diaper pail which is a large metal step lever trash can, it's full of dipes, cloth wipes, mama cloth, family cloth and when a house guest mistakes it for the garbage whatever disposable product they bring into my home:P

When out and about I keep it all in a wetbag until I get home and toss it in my 'trash'...

I technically don't have any 'family cloth' and just use the cloth wipes i got for my daughter four years ago, and about a dozen wash cloths...

Is it possible to purchase family cloth for less than a dollar a square?

I think the only non crunchy thing about me is that I don't know how to sew...

post #358 of 440
old t shirts (any kind of jersey knit, there are some sheets made of it too) are a great no-sew, cheap option for family cloth!! You can certainly do those for less than $1, probably free!
post #359 of 440

I just bought a curved squirt bottle from Sally Beauty -- the kind meant for hair color. It works great! But I do have a question... do you squirt from the front or the back?

post #360 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by pastrygirl View Post

I just bought a curved squirt bottle from Sally Beauty -- the kind meant for hair color. It works great! But I do have a question... do you squirt from the front or the back?

Curved? Can't picture that... Anyways - I was told ALWAYS front to back to keep solids away from your lady bits, if you KWIM. Unless maybe you have really good aim/control with your fancy bottle ;0)
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