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anyone try lazure painting themselves?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I really really want to pain ds's room and and the living room where he plays.
I have been looking at photos of lazure painting, and of course my waldorf school that i wen to was painted like that. I am just wondering if anyone tried doing it themselves...
I have some regular latex paint in nice colors. And i thought it would be nice to dilute it and use it.
Are there any resources explaining the technique in more details? I really want instructions more than just site with photos, etc.
If you tried doing it, I would appresiate any tips!
TIA
post #2 of 8
Ya' know what I was thinking is that you could go to Lowe's or Home Depot, etc., and get info on a technique that is similar, (glazing, layering using plastic bags or a dry brush for texture, etc.) and do something that has virtually the same light and "glow" effects. My mom just did her bathroom with two layers of paint, one just a hint lighter than the other, and it looks beautiful!

She's never even heard of Lazure but it looked the same to me and I used to be a Waldorf teacher!!!
post #3 of 8

lazure

I lazured my dd's room in a rainbow and it came out pretty nice. A little brighter than at school, but I think I put too much color in. She loves it, so that's what matters!
I used Behr deep base. I cup to 10 cups water-mix well. Divide up into seperate paper or plastic buckets and add high quality acrylic paint (in the tube from Art store) Start with just a little. It will be thin. You build up the layers on the wall to make the colors darker. You need 3 brushes with a fairly soft nap. One puts on the color (in a figure 8 pattern) the next brush blends and the 3rd dry brushes.
Feel free to pm me if you have more questions, I might be able to help
post #4 of 8
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post #5 of 8
For the last two years I volunteered at our school to help with the lazure painting. While I love the effect, and done well it is beautiful, It is a great deal of work which can be accomplished with latex at a quarter of the investment of time (and $ probably). The school used the beeswax and cassein of traditional lazure. The cassein "primer" being the biggest pain, as it's like plaster instead of paint. That's one of the effects, in my opinion, that you can't replicate with other materials. The pigment is absorbed into the cassein, and creates depth, like a fresco. Very pretty.

StarChild's suggestions sound like what I would do if I were trying to recreate it in my own home.

ozhenya buy small quantities and practive on a garage wall, to find the technique which will work for you.

~edit (didn't notice the thread was from '05
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarChild View Post
I lazured my dd's room in a rainbow and it came out pretty nice. A little brighter than at school, but I think I put too much color in. She loves it, so that's what matters!
I used Behr deep base. I cup to 10 cups water-mix well. Divide up into seperate paper or plastic buckets and add high quality acrylic paint (in the tube from Art store) Start with just a little. It will be thin. You build up the layers on the wall to make the colors darker. You need 3 brushes with a fairly soft nap. One puts on the color (in a figure 8 pattern) the next brush blends and the 3rd dry brushes.
Feel free to pm me if you have more questions, I might be able to help
Thanks for posting this! We just moved into a huge old house, and want to Lazure paint our girls' bedrooms at least. I will definitely try this way and see how it goes. I was thinking we were going to have to buy gallons of half a dozen colours to do it properly. What finish paint did you use- flat, eggshell?

I found a neat article in a back issue of Martha Stewart Living about making your own custom coloured chalkboard paint;

Custom Colors How-To

Start with flat-finish latex paint in any shade. For small areas, such as a door panel, mix 1 cup at a time.1. Pour 1 cup of paint into a container. Add 2 tablespoons of unsanded tile grout. Mix with a paint stirrer, carefully breaking up clumps.

2. Apply paint with a roller or a sponge paintbrush to a primed or painted surface. Work in small sections, going over the same spot several times to ensure full, even coverage. Let dry.

3. Smooth area with 150-grit sandpaper, and wipe off dust.

4. To condition: Rub the side of a piece of chalk over entire surface. Wipe away residue with a barely damp sponge.


I think it would be neat to do that below the chair rail in the rooms, and then lazure above.
post #7 of 8
:

I'm thinking about lazure painting, but have no idea where to start. Too bad there isn't a book on it! Any good resources?
post #8 of 8
I have done several rooms at our school and this is how we get it done over here

we use the famous Lazure paint brushes
then we use primer and the water colors from Mercurius as the pigment (that's it, that's the whole supply list) Oh and you need the wall to be white before you start

we mix it in a bucket with our hands. it is the consistency of watered down milk.


http://www.mercurius-usa.com/index.p...45ccdf43d10bd1

http://www.johnstolfo.com/upgrade/workshops2.html

Dip the paint brush in the bucket and start to paint in a figure 8 motion. from top to bottom of the wall, have a second person go over your painting with a dry Lazure brush, this is how the drips are taken away and the paint is smoothed out.

it takes a lot of are muscle.
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