or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at Home and Beyond › Common Misconceptions about Homeschooling
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Common Misconceptions about Homeschooling - Page 3

post #41 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedWine
Ahhh, thank you Lillian. Now my life is complete.
Good. And now you can put together some worksheets so that you can teach this to your children. This is much too important to the definition of whether they're well educated to take lightly. Maybe one of their assignments should be to write a letter to E.D. Hirsh to let him know he should include it in his books. - Lillian
post #42 of 107
Stacy- sure I LOVE being a mom, love being a SAHM, love being a HS mom... but I still do this sometimes and I remember my SAHM/HS mom doing the same thing...

and then afterwards

LOL
post #43 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleet76
I guess it is just hard to picture things being more manageable than they are now with a challenging toddler, and sometimes I feel crazy for looking forward to signing myself up for years and years of struggles. Any reassurance? I know this is a misconception, and I do think we would do well homeschooling together, but still...
Well, for one thing, they get older pretty darned fast, so you won't have a toddler much longer, and then you'll be able to handle things in much more reasonable conversations. If you put of formal studies till later rather than earlier, that's all the better. If you try to formal studies with little ones who don't really have any need of it, it can be pretty trying for all concerned (not that I'm a proponent of "formal studies" at later ages, so I guess that's easy for me to say, huh? ). You and they can have a lot of fun just playing for a long time to come, and the rest will fall into place as it comes along. I think it's often easier to raise children when you don't have to deal with some of the things that can be picked up at school - or at least it was for me. They could have perfectly fine school experiences - or not - but school is something you need to be involved with in lots of ways, and it can be stressful too. Lillian
post #44 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillian J


Well, for one thing, they get older pretty darned fast, so you won't have a toddler much longer, and then you'll be able to handle things in much more reasonable conversations. If you put of formal studies till later rather than earlier, that's all the better. If you try to formal studies with little ones who don't really have any need of it, it can be pretty trying for all concerned (not that I'm a proponent of "formal studies" at later ages, so I guess that's easy for me to say, huh? ). You and they can have a lot of fun just playing for a long time to come, and the rest will fall into place as it comes along. I think it's often easier to raise children when you don't have to deal with some of the things that can be picked up at school - or at least it was for me. They could have perfectly fine school experiences - or not - but school is something you need to be involved with in lots of ways, and it can be stressful too. Lillian
:

I second everything in Lillian's post and especially want to comment on the second part. DD went to school until 5th grade and I'll be honest and say I didn't want to HS, I just felt I had to because of all the $*%& she was going through in school. I was sure I would never be able to handle being around her all day with no breaks and I'd never get her to do any work. I mean homework was such a huge struggle that surely hs would be a nightmere, right? Wrong. Once she was out of school her attitude improved a lot for not having to deal with all that. Plus not having to get her up early and out the door and then trying to finish the homework in the 2hr slot we had before bedtime...well you get the picture.
post #45 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3momkmb
I mean homework was such a huge struggle that surely hs would be a nightmere, right? Wrong. Once she was out of school her attitude improved a lot for not having to deal with all that.
:


The "homework" thing is one of the biggest reasons people fear homeschooling - been there/done that. It's understandably hard to make people understand that there's no comparisong between what goes on when you're trying to get your child through homework and what goes on once that's all a thing of the past. - Lillian
post #46 of 107
Yhanks, guys! Your responses make sense (and I think I know those things), but I just haven't been there yet. Kind of like when someone tells you that having a baby changes everything, and you think, "duh"--but then you have the baby and you really *know* what they meant. Except for homeschooling, I guess it's the opposite... It is easier/less of a big deal than most people think it to be--especially those of us dealing with 2-yr old tantrums everyday and no older children to see the future through...
post #47 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleet76
Kind of like when someone tells you that having a baby changes everything, and you think, "duh"--but then you have the baby and you really *know* what they meant. Except for homeschooling, I guess it's the opposite... It is easier/less of a big deal than most people think it to be--especially those of us dealing with 2-yr old tantrums everyday and no older children to see the future through...
Less! But I LOVE the example you made! I remember well how it used to irritate me when people said that about how having a baby was going to change my life - and I guess part of that was because some of them were saying it in a gloating way. It did change my life radically - but for the better. That 2 year old won't be around much longer, so love every minute of it. When I first had a babe in arms, a man I met told me that when you raise a child, you experience the death of many young children. The 1 year old is gone, then 2 year old, the 3 year old, etc. - all those different faces and personalities go as the person morphs and grows. You adore every one equally, and it's still the same person, but sometimes it would be nice to be able to have a visit with one of the ones no longer around. I was grateful for the tip - it served me well. Lillian
post #48 of 107
A few I haven't seen:

I should put the kids in school so that:
-I can get a break
-I can "get a job" (ie, paid work)
-I can concentrate on my "real job", which is caring for the house ( this from my FIL.)

MY FIL is also up in arms that I don't give the kid grades. He actually seems upset that we stay with a concept until they get it.
post #49 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by warriorprincess
I can "get a job" (ie, paid work)
-I can concentrate on my "real job", which is caring for the house ( this from my FIL.
: Oh, my gosh, did that give me the long, hard laugh I've been needing today! And here I go again! : - Lillian
post #50 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillian J


Less! But I LOVE the example you made! I remember well how it used to irritate me when people said that about how having a baby was going to change my life - and I guess part of that was because some of them were saying it in a gloating way. It did change my life radically - but for the better.
Amen to that! Most people do say that in a gloating sort of tone, but one of dh's (male) friends said that same thing... and when I responded with a half-hearted "Uh-huh", he was like, "Yeah, it's really great!". I thought that was cool.
post #51 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by busybusymomma
Stacy- sure I LOVE being a mom, love being a SAHM, love being a HS mom... but I still do this sometimes and I remember my SAHM/HS mom doing the same thing...

and then afterwards

LOL

I had a rotten day with my 4yo today. Lots of ... but we did . I guess I needed to hear that it all comes out good in the end. Thanks, Michelle...
post #52 of 107
I haven't read the whole thread so forgive me if this has been mentioned. I get a LOT of people around here assuming that we follow the same schedule as the school (including school hours and vacations) and that the local school GIVES US all our homeschooling materials. You should see the look on their faces when I tell them the school doesn't give us jack squat. I think a lot of people assume all homeschooling = state school at home.
post #53 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by lckrause
I haven't read the whole thread so forgive me if this has been mentioned. I get a LOT of people around here assuming that we follow the same schedule as the school (including school hours and vacations) and that the local school GIVES US all our homeschooling materials. You should see the look on their faces when I tell them the school doesn't give us jack squat. I think a lot of people assume all homeschooling = state school at home.
Oh! And that leads me into the one having to do with the assumption that we get our instructions from school authorities as to how to do it: "No? Well, then how do you know what [or how] to teach him?" But honestly, I think I find the assumption that I must be a wonderful "teacher" even harder to swallow. It's as if my son is some kind of idiot who can't teach himself. I don't really quite understand why that one bugs me so much. - Lillian
post #54 of 107
We will come to our senses and stop homeschooling. Giving our child a school themed scrap book will help us see the light.

Any behavior or personality trait can be blamed on homeschooling and school would fix it. For example, my dd would never be an introvert if we just sent her to school.

Homeschooling is lazy and neglectful. Children need to be FORCED to learn otherwise they will not do anything. Flexible equals spoiling.
post #55 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlyzombiecat
. For example, my dd would never be an introvert if we just sent her to school.
Ummm . . . school is what made me an introvert!!!! I was very outgoing until I started school & then since I wasn't willing to change who I was to join a "clique" I just kept more & more to myself.
post #56 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetpeas
Ummm . . . school is what made me an introvert!!!! I was very outgoing until I started school & then since I wasn't willing to change who I was to join a "clique" I just kept more & more to myself.
DITTO! Seeing my DD become more timid is one of the reasons I'm not continuing her in PS next year.
post #57 of 107
Quote:
Ummm . . . school is what made me an introvert!!!! I was very outgoing until I started school
Me too :/
post #58 of 107
What I've found most interesting is that the only people who are against homeschooling (or against *me* homeschooling in particular ) are poorly adjusted and have no children of their own.

From those two people, I've heard:

"You can't homeschool, you're not a teacher and only a teacher can teach kids how to read/do math/etc."

"Why would you want to shelter your kids like that? Are you afraid of them seeing the real world? You can't run their lives forever, you know."

"You shouldn't homeschool because you're not a Christian, and without a sound moral foundation your kids will grow up to be horrible people." (This one really confused me... only Christians have morals? Kids get solid moral foundations in Public School? )

"You're at least going to find a tutor to teach them important things, right?"

From various other sources:

"You'll send your kid to school if they're gifted/learning disabled/troublesome, I'm sure. Just wait and see." :

"How will they socialize?"

"Kids never learn anything unless you force them, because learning is hard/boring/whatever." (I always feel sorry for those people. )

"It's okay for you to homeschool, but normal people with normal kids can't."
post #59 of 107
Sigh...I really thought I wouldn't be able to contribute to this thread. I was wrong. I'm going to start hs'ing DD next year, partially because she is bored at school and partially because of bullying. She's in 4th grade now. My MIL the retired teacher is all for it. My friends all think it's great except one, and she's being open minded about it. My mom is adamantly opposed to this. Her reasoning?

"Well it would be different if DD was well adjusted. All you are going to do is teach her that you run away when you have problems with people bullying you" Excuse me??? First off, DD is quite well adjusted, thank you. The problem is the obnoxious clique leader at her school, not my DD. Second, sucking it up when people are being mean to you teaches you what? Whatever it is, I don't need DD learning it. I learned it quite well, and it sucked.

Also "well she's going to have to go back to school eventually, and learning to deal with boredom is good for you. When she goes back in high school, she's going to have a heck of a time"

Sigh...there is no response to that. I decided against saying "we don't know that she's going to high school, we may keep on hs'ing!" Not even having that discussion, it's none of her business.
post #60 of 107
rebeccalizzie- puuuhleaze... sometimes it ticks me off when people think kids should just learn to "deal" with being bullied or mistreated. It's sad- your dd is lucky to have a mama who takes care of her!

BTW... I was mostly homeschooled but did attend PS for a couple of years. The last year I was in PS, a big fat boy (probably three times my petite size) literally picked me up and body slammed me on the playground. My parents were livid and I was terrified- the school principal blamed it on hormones and the boy was not disciplined at all. WTH? I'm just glad my parents pulled me out before it got even worse.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Learning at Home and Beyond
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at Home and Beyond › Common Misconceptions about Homeschooling