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toy guns and guns ?? - Page 2

post #21 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedWine
I played with toy guns as a child. I knew very well the difference between pretend play and the real thing. I was a very gentle, peaceful kid. I liked to play with the guns because the idea of pretend-shooting and having someone fall over laughing was amusing ot me. The falling over laughing was what was amusing. I knew what a real gun could do, and violence disgusts me now as it did back then.

The point of my ramblings is that as long as children understand the very real difference between play and reality, I don't see toy guns as a problem.

thank you great point w/ laughter and pretend play.
post #22 of 137
Thread Starter 
[QUOTE=meowmix]We have water guns in the summer, used to squirt water only and not to be used as pretend guns to kill people/animals. I have mixed feelings about guns, I don't really like the violent play I feel they would encourage but I am not neccessarily against guns in general. If my children were older and wanted to learn to shoot a real rifle (as in skeet shooting or the like) I think I would be OK with it. But not as a toy.


Yes that is it ! I think it is the violent play I was concered with . This is also about using water guns get wet etc.. never to pretend to kill someone or something . Some one mention the pratt falls of a fake death which i can also remeber as a kid doing and laughing with my sister .
post #23 of 137
Something else I wanted to mention is that most people who own guns, if asked by a parent if there are guns in the house, will lie and say no. (According to a Universty of Michigan study in the late 90s). Chances are, your child will be in a home that has guns at some point. I just hope they know proper from improper use.
post #24 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaInTheBoonies
That is not the reason I will not allow weapons in my home, toy nor real. It is the very idea that it is okay to hurt or kill another human being, that I am not okay with.

Part of being anti-violence is never acting violently, that includes pretending to shoot or stab or taser. Those are violent acts, whether done in play or not.
My DH also grew up hunting some and his father still does as I said we do not have guns and the house nor will we ever (real). Times have changed I grew up in so.cal and every boy I knew had bebe gun . These days none of our neighboor kids have one. My insticts have been to allow the boys to play w/ a h2o gun when we are in s situtaion where other kids have them . But at this point i do not plan on purchasing any toy guns of any kind. My 3 yr ds got some lego people w/ guns and they went in the trash , quick. When ds plays lego it is a vey focused and quite time seeing guns on the lego people was such a turn off.

this is all great food for thought . thank you thank you !!
post #25 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubyWild
That's not my concern. My concern is that they might mistake a gun for a toy and play with it because they've already learned poor firearm safety.

YES !I agree.
post #26 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bleurae
I grew up in a hunting family, I learned gun safety early and often. That said I will NOT have ANY gund in my home. No water guns, bubble guns, anything. They make squirt toys that are not shaped like guns, as well as bubble things. They are fine. Guns are not something I want my son to have experience with. This country has far far too many deaths per year sue to guns, far too many involving kids, I was a high school teacher before staying home with Bliss and I have seen to much. My next door neighbor growing up accidently shot his best friend with a gun on a wall in the home that was loaded, one of thos experiences everyone hears about but thinks happens to others. The family all was well versed on gun safety as well, but I heard the shot and the screams from the horror of the family when it happened. My son can be a super hero, a firefighter, a peace warrior who flys around teaching peace, a tickle monster who "gets" people with tickles. He has an imagination and can use it for a million others things than shooting at the other guy.
Tears and Truth , I hear you and have heard so many of those stories . Why take the chance.
We have skateboard, bikes, scooters, swords, capes , the sarah's silk and zoo animals have been a fav lately . To get some energy out today we were lucky enough to be able to run on the sand with a warm wind in our faces with a bunch of great friends. Your right threr is plenty to creat. just for a laugh my ds was "SUPER UKLELE GUY " for halloween.
post #27 of 137
My sons only 2, and it hasn't been any sort of dael yet. I definately say NO WAY when it comes to this issue. I think maybe a water gun might be okay for a teenagers stocking stuffer. But that's just so he can keep the cat off the dining room table.
post #28 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubyWild
We own guns, and I grew up around guns and hunting. For that reason, we were never allowed to play with toy guns and were trained in firearm safety, training which included never pretending to shoot any living thing, even with a toy. Guns are for killing, and none of the children in our extended family were allowed to pretend to kill things.
Ditto. While we don't currently have any guns, both dh and I started shooting as young children. We both grew up in avid hunting families. I hunted until about puberty - the hormones made me hate the early mornings and cold weather Ds got to handle some real guns and learn some about it this summer at sil's house...her dh is a big game hunter and all the kids hunt as well.

Bottom line at our house, and ds says this all the time, guns kill people and are never toys.
post #29 of 137
My seven year-old nephew was pretend shooting his mom with some stupid rifle he got for Christmas, aiming it right at her head and I have to say the sight just irritated and disgusted me more than I thought it would. (HE didn't irritate me, but the fact that he had a toy gun did.) I thought people stopped buying them so much for their kids? I'm sure he'll play with them elsewhere, and I will certainly do my best to discuss safety and the difference between the real and the pretend kind, but I'll never buy them as toys. Toy guns repulse me, actually. Even squirt guns bug me a little, but I have a feeling I'll be undermined in that battle pretty quickly. They're pretty much everywhere.
post #30 of 137
I have no problem with toy guns. Most of the kids we know that are forbibben to play with them make toy guns out of other toys/materials. I also have no problem with real guns. If dd shows an interest in competative shooting or something, we will be happy to show her responsible gun use and ownership. I HATE guns and will not touch one. It is too powerful for me and I get very emotional. However, dh is a competative shooter (and yes, a vegan too) and WAS NOT allowed to play with toy guns as a child. I was allowed to play with toy guns and have never had any interest whatsoever is touching one, although I did enjoy playing cops and robbers. Ironically, I was never ever allowed to eat candy cigarettes and have been a smoker for 14 years (I quit for New year's this year and am still going strong - yay). I really do not think there is much correlation between forbibben toys, actions, thoughts, etc and later actions, attitudes, and personal preferences. Kids do know the difference between real and pretend and I see no reason to forbid any type of play. If anything, the chance to explore something in the safety of pretend play allows kids to work out their feelings on the subject rather than have a one-track-mind attitude about getting/doing the real thing after the pretending has been forbidden.
post #31 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaInTheBoonies
That is not the reason I will not allow weapons in my home, toy nor real. It is the very idea that it is okay to hurt or kill another human being, that I am not okay with.

Part of being anti-violence is never acting violently, that includes pretending to shoot or stab or taser. Those are violent acts, whether done in play or not.
ITA with this. We were not allowed to have any toy or real guns in our home growing up, and I do not plan on having any around my children. Pretending to kill isn't fun for me, and it isn't something I want my kids to grow up with.
post #32 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmd
But they were allowed to go out and actually kill things? I don't get this. To me, that is a thousand times worse that pretending...
I think this is a common view since our society has become so removed from the true sources of our food. If you are someone who chooses to eat meat, why pretend that it "comes from the store" when you could be honest with your children? My husband and oldest son (9 years old) are both hunters. My son has been trained to safely handle his gun. We absolutely do not allow gun "play" of any sort, because it downplays the severity of what a gun really does - it kills things. Guns are not toys, they are useful tools for those of us who choose to acknowledge and select the source of the food we put in our mouths.
post #33 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by cozzensclan
I think this is a common view since our society has become so removed from the true sources of our food. If you are someone who chooses to eat meat, why pretend that it "comes from the store" when you could be honest with your children? My husband and oldest son (9 years old) are both hunters. My son has been trained to safely handle his gun. We absolutely do not allow gun "play" of any sort, because it downplays the severity of what a gun really does - it kills things. Guns are not toys, they are useful tools for those of us who choose to acknowledge and select the source of the food we put in our mouths.
ITA. I guess we could get baseball bats and try and beat the moose, elk, or buffalo we eat.....not sure if it would be safe, let alone a humane way to die.

As for handguns, which are typically the most common 'toy', those were specifically made to kill human beings, not animals. Same with swords and grenades, also seen as 'toys' in the store.

There are squirt bottles that can be used to squirt water at each other, the same kind that grandma uses to water her plants. they look nothing like handguns and were specifically designed and made to squirt water. For my family, we do not squirt water at each other, as it is not a loving action.

I teach my family to think and act with love, especially when it comes to interactions between us. It is not a loving act to squirt your sister. It is a loving act to swim with your sister. It is not a loving act to hit. It is a loving act to ask for a hug or ask to hug your sister.
post #34 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by yoopervegan
I have no problem with toy guns. Most of the kids we know that are forbibben to play with them make toy guns out of other toys/materials.
I never forbid things, nor label them "bad". I do teach my childrn a way of life that is non-violent and anti-violence.
Quote:
Originally Posted by yoopervegan
I really do not think there is much correlation between forbibben toys, actions, thoughts, etc and later actions, attitudes, and personal preferences. Kids do know the difference between real and pretend and I see no reason to forbid any type of play. If anything, the chance to explore something in the safety of pretend play allows kids to work out their feelings on the subject rather than have a one-track-mind attitude about getting/doing the real thing after the pretending has been forbidden.
I can understand the point you are making, but I disagree. If you pretend to act violently, you are desensitizing your physical and emotional being to violence.
post #35 of 137
I haven't bought any weapons (swords, guns, etc.) for my son until he was about 5 years old and we were at the circus and I let him have one of those glowing swords. I wouldn't buy him any weapons because I usually became the target for any attacks, and when he was 2 and 3 he was learning to keep his hands to himself!

Even though I didn't buy him any weapons, he still managed to fashion weapons of his own. A stick became a sword, a puzzle piece in the shape of a gun became a gun. So, even though I didn't buy him a weapon, he was still able to make one. Even without anything to use, fingers and hands can easily turn into the shape of a gun. I just taught him that his "swords" shouldn't hit anyone and reminded him that his "guns" are no contact weapons.

Historically, men were the hunter/gatherers and I think it is in little boys nature to throw things and play "fight". One weekend a couple years ago, we visited my parents cabin where they have a dart board. I swear, for two whole days, he did nothing but throw darts at that dart board. It's funny how he just instinctually just needs to throw things (honing that spear throwing skill I guess).

He's 7 now and still drawn to weapons. Is it a male thing? Probably. Is it something you can control their interest in? Probably not. Teaching safety and common sense is key.
post #36 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by karinasusy
He's 7 now and still drawn to weapons. Is it a male thing? Probably. Is it something you can control their interest in? Probably not. Teaching safety and common sense is key.
I do not think it is human nature or instinct to want to hurt or kill other human beings. A baby is born smiling and wanting to love and be loved, not cause pain, hurt or kill.
post #37 of 137
That's not what I said. For millennia we did kill our own food and a lot of cultures still do. This is normal and a part of human nature.
post #38 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by karinasusy
For millennia we did kill our own food and a lot of cultures still do. This is normal and a part of human nature.
ITA, but it is/was a learned behavior.
It is not natural to make a gun out of paper, or make a sword, both of which are specifically designed to kill human beings, not animals.
post #39 of 137
double post
post #40 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by cozzensclan
I think this is a common view since our society has become so removed from the true sources of our food. If you are someone who chooses to eat meat, why pretend that it "comes from the store" when you could be honest with your children? My husband and oldest son (9 years old) are both hunters. My son has been trained to safely handle his gun. We absolutely do not allow gun "play" of any sort, because it downplays the severity of what a gun really does - it kills things. Guns are not toys, they are useful tools for those of us who choose to acknowledge and select the source of the food we put in our mouths.

No need for that - our family does not eat meat. I totally agree with that sentence.
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