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Felt play food - Page 2

post #21 of 128
I just want to add a few thoughts about the wool verses acrylic felt topic - Wool fibers are very difficult to ignite, and are self extinguishing; that is, they quit burning when removed from the source of the flame. Acrylic, on the other hand ignites at a very low temperature, and continues to burn when removed from the flame source and turns into a sticky mass of hot melted plastic which adheres to the skin, kind of like napalm. For this reason alone, I do not recommend using acrylic in toys. It is simply not safe in products meant for children. Polyester felt has a higher melting point, and would be a better choice, if you are looking to use a completely synthetic felted fiber. I believe that Central Shippee carried poly felt at one time, but I haven't checked that source lately.

As far as moths and other bugs, I have never had a problem with them on any of the wool felt that I have purchased in the last three decades. I think it must be mothproofed these days. They do go after the wool stuffing that I use, and the roving, as well. Placing these into a plastic bag in the freezer compartment for a couple of days cures the problem.

As far as making "heirlooms" goes, if your children are quite young, you may not be aware of it yet, but they tend to create their own ideas about what they consider an heirloom, and it might surprise you when they do. My own children treasured the things that I made for them, regardless of what it was made out of!
post #22 of 128
I am not that concerned about the fake bacon bursting into flames. I don't know, I think we have a clearly diffrent quality in mind. mine is cute (imho) and sewn but otherwise is just a step above paper cutouts. I just wanted something that wouldn't leave a mark when it hit you in the head and was a little more whimiscal than real. . . . . and it never gets near flames.

here is a picture of my "leftovers " from my Christmas presents. its a bad picture. it works for my kids. I have about $.50 into it and it took me all of 30 minutes to whip up. I guess if it does go up in flames or isn't the top quality it just doesn't matter to me. it is fun to make, my girls did the strawberries themselves, we had a blast doing it together. I don't think I could make the real thing in 30 mintes if it took too much time and money I would be hesitant to let my childen play with it much less be the ones to sew it. i would be chasing them making sure the played with them right (as opposed to thier strawberry wars : ) it would be bad. I don't know how much wool cost where you are but here it is like $8 a yeard which is way prohibitive. i could never afford to make it if I had to pay that much for materials. we are just making goofy little craft projects and play food. not artistic heirloom masterpeices. think more along the lines of strawberry torpedos
post #23 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyka

here is a picture of my "leftovers " from my Christmas presents. its a bad picture. it works for my kids. I have about $.50 into it and it took me all of 30 minutes to whip up. erry torpedos

those are adorable! i wish that i could work that fast.
post #24 of 128
Quote:
As far as moths and other bugs, I have never had a problem with them on any of the wool felt that I have purchased in the last three decades. I think it must be mothproofed these days.
That is an interesting observation. I wonder what they are using, and if it is toxic. I find that even my older children will 'mouth' play food. Any ideas on where to find out?
post #25 of 128
Lilyka, that is an adorable set!
post #26 of 128
The moth proofing is added to the raw wool during processing - not sprayed on the surface of the felt. There are also chemical dyes used to color the felt. Even natural plant based dyes can be very toxic. But since wool is naturally flame retardant, that is one less chemical to worry about. With acrylic, you have that issue, in addition to the formaldehyde that is used in the fiber processing, which off gasses forever.

We never plan to catch something on fire, but accidents do happen! All toys manufactured overseas must be tested for flammabilty, and pass certain standards of safety, prior to importing to the US. Shouldn't we be as cautious with our own kids?
post #27 of 128
I agree we should be cautious, but I also think some commonsense goes a long way. There are laws regarding flame-retardant polyester sleepwear that I happily ignore since I researched and learned the facts behind the regulations, for example.

I didn't really mean to start a debate over the merits of acrylic versus wool or natural versus synthetic. Whenever possible, I try to chose the least processed, most natural materials for my children and myself. But what is possible for me is different than what is possible for you or what is possible for someone else. I think we should be respectful of where other mamas find themselves on the NFL continuum.

Your comments about the chemicals added during processing has spurred new resolve to add needle- and wet-felted foods to my children's selection. I know I can buy minimally processed wool, and if I do the felting and dyeing myself, I will feel better about the end product. Thank you for the information.
post #28 of 128
oh and I wanted to say that needle felting id very cool. I have ben wanting to do something similar to make berries, apples and oranges. But it always seemed like a lot of wool. that makes it look like so much less than I was thinkging.

so for people who know about wool. . . . are all wools created equaly at least in terms of felting from puffs? I have access to alpaca . . . heavenly soft, inexpensive is I am not picky.
post #29 of 128
Lilyka those are adorable food items you crafted!! Yum
post #30 of 128
Someone on here actually made some last summer or something and I copied. so props to her. the strawberries were my idea though
post #31 of 128
Thank you! I am pretty sure it was me! I did like your strawberries.
post #32 of 128

Felt Source, Knitted food pattern link...

I'd asked earlier in this thread about wool blend/synthetic felt that was of good quality -- I usually use wool for my small toy and doll projects, which is wonderful, but am interested in doing some larger toy and flannelboard projects (for some home 'preschooling' stuff) that would take a lot of felt, so was looking for something a little less pricey. The felt that I buy here *starts* at about $12 (USD) a yard, so I've got to watch it!

Anyway, I got a sample card from Central Shippee (thefeltpeople.com) and their "Durafelt" is pretty good, much thicker than the stuff I find at the craft shop. Lots of colours. They also have some thicker versions, Durathick Medium and Heavy, that are good. Their prices for these are about 5.50-8.25 a yard (USD), and they have a $75 minimum order. So I guess if you have larger projects or can order with someone else or something, it could work. I think they can direct you to sources for smaller orders, too, but I don't have the info on that.
Also, in the fibre/food vein, the February issue of Magknits has a cute knitted sushi pattern! http://www.magknits.com/feb06/patterns/sushi.htm
There was another issue that had fruits and vegetables, too I think.
post #33 of 128
oh my goodness. that is so freaking cute!!
post #34 of 128
The wool felt from Central Shippee is quite a bit stiffer than Dutch or even the Spanish wool felt. Both the 100% wool and the blends, of which they carry several different ratios, are stiff and boardy in comparison. I think C.S. uses a stiffer glue sizing that gives the felt that boardy hand. It is great for blocked hats and booties, anything that needs to hold its shape without stuffing, and where you want the durability, but for hand sewing and small items - ouch! it's hard on your hands. I think the color selection of the Dutch 100% wool is by far the best (and I love the soft feeling). The last time I checked with C.S. they just had a limited color selection, like gold, red, navy and forest.
post #35 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by E.V. Lowi
The wool felt from Central Shippee is quite a bit stiffer than Dutch or even the Spanish wool felt. Both the 100% wool and the blends, of which they carry several different ratios, are stiff and boardy in comparison. I think C.S. uses a stiffer glue sizing that gives the felt that boardy hand. It is great for blocked hats and booties, anything that needs to hold its shape without stuffing, and where you want the durability, but for hand sewing and small items - ouch! it's hard on your hands. I think the color selection of the Dutch 100% wool is by far the best (and I love the soft feeling). The last time I checked with C.S. they just had a limited color selection, like gold, red, navy and forest.
Thanks -- I got only the poly felt samples from C.S. I'm very happy with the 100% wool felt that I get from Brooklyn General (I'm not sure if it's Spanish or Dutch, but the quality, feel, and colours are excellent) that I use for toys. Whoa -- I was way off when I said $12 a yard in my earlier post, it's a few times more, but it's beautiful stuff. The Marcus Brothers blend is 70% wool and less expensive; I've used it for a few toys so far, and it's worked well -- it has a different feel...still soft, but different.

The samples C.S. sent ranged in stiffness; I think the regular Durafelt will work for me for the flannelboard pieces, and other less stitchy toys, and they have about 60 colours in that, and some prints and patterns. I did a little test sewing, just to see, and it was OK, nowhere near the 'good stuff', though. Definitely drier and harder on the fingers and needles... The Durastiff and Durathick samples were definitely more what you describe in terms of stiffness, much more appropriate for glue crafts. They seem like they would not be at all fun to hand sew.

Had a needle felting question but I think I'm getting too far away from felt play food!
post #36 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyka
I am not that concerned about the fake bacon bursting into flames. I don't know, I think we have a clearly diffrent quality in mind.
here is a picture of my "leftovers " from my Christmas presents. its a bad picture. it craft projects and play food. not artistic heirloom masterpeices. think more along the lines of strawberry torpedos
I had a chance to check out your link, and see your stuff - I love your felt food! I bet your kids will turn them into heirlooms regardless of what you think!
post #37 of 128
lilyka, that food is soooo adorable! What a wonderful job you did!
post #38 of 128
That felt sushi is amazing!! i am currently making donuts...
post #39 of 128
You guys are so inspiring. Ihave my tacos in front of me. My kids aer so excited about them.
post #40 of 128
I've done:
eggs and bacon
pancakes and syrup
cookies (oreos, sugar cookies, fruit newtons, choco chips)

On my list to do are:
*tacos (tortillas, lettuce piece, tomato circles, cheese slice, beans circle)
*sandwich (breads, cheeses, lettuce, mustard, pickles, brown ambiguos "could be meat, could be a bean spread" piece)
*pitas (uses a lot of similar fillings from above)
*donuts (I love adding beads as sprinkles - dd doesn't put stuff in mouth)
*sushi (though not sure how I'll do it, sushi has been a dream since I first tried making food lmao!)
*pizza (dough, one layer tomatoe paste, one layer cheese, then smaller pieces of tomatoes, onions, peppers, mushrooms).

OK, I doubt I'll actually make *all* of these, but they are fun gifts for my and friends' kids. For Christmas I made goodies fo rmy own daughter, and also made a "tea set" for my friend's daughters with a play silk as a table cloth, and a mix of cookies in a tin.

Baby calls...
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