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Does anyone give as part of your budget? - Page 2

post #21 of 43
I don't believe in tithing, nor do I believe that giving has to be a monetary amount. I also do not believe that in order to to be financially solvent and successful that you need to give. In my spirituality yes doing good deeds gets you good karma back, but that does not mean your life will suck if you do not do them. Success is in the eye of the beholder. To 1 person success may be making $250,000 a year while to another it is being available 24/7 to their kids living in a smaller house, driving older vehicles, not working 60hour weeks and making $20,000/year. As for $$$ coming in, it seems to me the more a person makes the more crap they find to spend it on and they may not end up any better off than someone making considerably less.

I do not have a set amount I give, but if there is a cause that I feel deserves it and we can currently afford $ I will give. Most of the causes out there I refuse to give to for spiritual reasons.
post #22 of 43

We give

10% as well. One day I'd like to say we actually saved 10% too. LOL When debt is gone can you imagine how we'd all live and give. Most books say to give 10% is to definitely learn to live within your means. And it's so true for us. When we finally started tithing we noticed all our bills are paid yes we had to cut things out like cable and eating out to tithe but we are better for it. It's also the first check I write. I'm the one that benefits from writing the check as we are the ones that see the rewards. It's not to be a better person but I will do as God commands and pay my tithe. We've been tithing for over 9 years and never missed it. Once you start the pattern it's just part of the routine and one of the bills. We're currently doing Dave Ramsey's debt snowball and it's working. I can't wait til we can get out of debt. Then I want to pay the house off and live like no one else. It's hard to wait when I want my debt gone instantly. LOL Oops off topic. Yes um humm we tithe/give 10%. Helps you keep yourself in line and your reign on your money when you give.
post #23 of 43
We don't give a set amount, but we do try to give fairly often. We give to our church, to Feed the Children, to crisis pregnancy centers... to whatever charities we feel the need to donate to.
post #24 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieMF
I don't believe in tithing, nor do I believe that giving has to be a monetary amount. I also do not believe that in order to to be financially solvent and successful that you need to give. In my spirituality yes doing good deeds gets you good karma back, but that does not mean your life will suck if you do not do them. Success is in the eye of the beholder. To 1 person success may be making $250,000 a year while to another it is being available 24/7 to their kids living in a smaller house, driving older vehicles, not working 60hour weeks and making $20,000/year. As for $$$ coming in, it seems to me the more a person makes the more crap they find to spend it on and they may not end up any better off than someone making considerably less.

I do not have a set amount I give, but if there is a cause that I feel deserves it and we can currently afford $ I will give. Most of the causes out there I refuse to give to for spiritual reasons.
I agree completely. I give what I do because money can help others and go further for others than it can for me. Not because I want good karma or anything in return, you know/
post #25 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by dinade
We're currently doing Dave Ramsey's debt snowball and it's working.

Dave ramsey is awsome. Our church teaches a class by him and almost everyone who takes it instantly stops accumulating debt while beginning to tithe and is usually debt free except for thier house in a short time. and pay off thier mortage in 5-10 years. It is incredible to think what we could all do if we starte dliving within our means. I can't wait until we are out of debt and can really start giving. To some extent Idon't consider our tithe "giving". it is just what commands. Giving to me is going above that.
post #26 of 43
I posted our budget on the other thread, but didn't include giving because I take that out of the money we get as gifts for birthdays and Christmas, not our monthly budget.
post #27 of 43
Thread Starter 
Whether or not one gives from tithing (specifically due to Biblical direction or perhaps family tradition) or just to be kind, giving is still a wonderful thing to do, and I don't think anyone here is saying it's not a good thing to do. Of course, each person is going to have a different method or currency (such as giving time if you don't have the money). And everyone here, regardless of motivation, has spoken of giving in a really sweet way.

One thing, though, I must speak to "doing good deeds gets you good karma back, but that does not mean your life will suck if you do not do them."

But that's exactly what karma means. The absence of goodness (not doing good deeds) can't just be some kind of "empty" zone where life goes on and nothing happens. For those for whom karma is a life-guiding principle, and I am simply speaking from the stance someone practicing strict Buddhist ethics, karma is seen as the reason why one would choose to commit goodness as much as one can train the mind to do so - because good deeds lead to happy life and mind. It means you are taking care of others as a lifelong practice. The absence of doing good deeds in one's life is unbearable to think of for a Buddhist who has studied scripture. It means certain unhappiness for oneself and others.

I don't mean to be critical of anyone's personal spiritual practice. But I did want say something about karma from a strict spiritual practice that uses karmic principles as a guiding motivation. The Buddha said "Giving creates wealth; leading an ethical life creates happiness..." and so on in his teaching about karma and what actions cause what results. We give, not to become wealthy, but to sow seeds to see everyone comfortable and never lacking in financial stability. It's NOT meant to be a judgement thing; it's seen as a simple life principle, like - gravity works to keep us from flying off the planet, and, that's how karma works relating to generosity (that financial stability is the natural result of giving).

I hope I haven't offended anyone. I just wanted folks to understand that for some, principles like karma are sacred scriptural directions; as sacred as Biblically-directed ethics are to Christians.
post #28 of 43
I don't work giving into my normal budget. We don't belong to a church, so we don't give that way. I tend to give to individuals a lot. If a friend is having a really rough time or a story that strikes a cord with me, I will often run a sale on my items (soaps and toiletries) and give the procedes to that family directly, so it is often me giving of my items to bring in money for them and I am just kinda the middle man. I also donate soaps to women's shelters, auctions for charities, etc. I donate lots of time to causes that I feel strongly about (I volunteer with a breastfeeding organization for instance). We cannot afford to make donations as an x% of our income every month, so we donate to things when we can and we donate more time than money.
I guess I follow the idea of karma, but also just the whole idea of treat others how you would want to be treated. So, it isn't so much how I think I will profit based on donations.... but that I think treating people with kindness and generosity encourages them and others to do the same and eventually that may all come back around again or may be there when I am in need.
post #29 of 43
We do work giving into our budget, because it comes out of our bank accounts automatically. If we forget to budget for it, something bounces. I prefer giving this way, because I wouldn't be able to find the money if it wasn't automatic.
We give as much as we can afford, because we believe in the causes, and because we believe you have to give to receive. It is less than 10% of our income.
post #30 of 43
We're pagan, so tithing isn't an issue: we give around 5% of our total family income by direct debit, plus extra when it's needed, like the earthquake in Pakistan.
post #31 of 43
we have a small donation in our monthly budget, but really that is the bottom line, we just don't budget any other giving we might do, and it isn't planned, it's kind of as the Lord shows us. It could be 10 of that months income, it could be 80, or whatever we have in savings, who knows. We just need to be open to it.
post #32 of 43
I hear you on the circle of karma, but to give for your own good would defeat the benefits of giving. You give from your heart to help others, to sew the seeds of generosity... you don't give to gain.

An extreme example, walmart and other corporations give to ''look good'' for their image. for a tax break. They will not have good karma simply because they give. Grassroots organizations give from their heart, and try and change the world in a positive way[even if it is in a smaller dollar value] and that is where the true good karma comes from imo.

That is all I was trying to say above.
post #33 of 43
It really is more blessed to give than to receive I think. We give at our church and then whenever someone is in need. We also have a little African boy that we send money to. His name is Abraham.
post #34 of 43
Since I volunteered my budget in the other thread Ill respond here.

Giving/donations etc come out of my misc. money category on my budget. There is not a set amount, its what I can give ($$) at the time. Whether it be the police fund, girl scouts, door to door enviromentalist, MIM, red cross, homeless beggar, cancer fundraiser, Salvation Army, gift trees etc. I have also fundraised $$ for causes, volunteered, raised money&ran for charity events/causes, donated blood, donated my time, sat on boards, donated clothes, etc.

Alas, tithing is not part of my giving.
post #35 of 43

Some thoughts on tithing

As a Latter-Day Saint (Mormon), I pay tithing on all money I receive, as part of my religious practice. It is the first thing I pay, and it is just a part of my budget. But I think that religion is irrelevant when it comes to application of the principles of tithing.

If we consider money as a form of energy (ie: you expend your "energy" at your job, and are compensated with a different "form" of energy...) then tithing is simply putting a portion of that energy back into the "universal stream", if you will. This keeps the flow going in a positive direction. Simple Abundance by Sarah Ban Breathnach has a very enlightening and inspirational (non-denominational) essay about the principles of tithing and the power of tithing to make you, as Sarah says, "more magnetic to money".

You can also consider tithing as a "thank-you note" to whatever source of universal good you believe in. (And as my mother used to say, "Those who say 'thank you' for the gifts they receive are more likely to receive more gifts.")
post #36 of 43
We give to charities each month (it's taken out of our account by direct debit) and we donate when we can (ie to charities who have set up stalls in the mall etc). We give at our Church too, but not 10% (our Church has some extremely generous people who make sure it's always meeting their budget) and our pastor teaches that time can be tithed as well - so we give to our Church in terms of service.
post #37 of 43
I hear what you are saying about tithing Kathirynne, but really I think tithing would have been constraining on me. For a long time I gave of my time and nto money, because I was young, single, and broke. It woudl have constrained me in that tithing is very specifically to give money, and not in other ways.
post #38 of 43
Thread Starter 
Rainbow, according to scripture, the karma works whether or not you do it for a "good" reason. If you give, you do receive, that's just a law. You can give understanding you will receive with a selfish motivation or you can give understanding you will receive with a selfless motivation. The first says - I'll use this law to benefit myself. The second says - I'll use this law to benefit as many living beings as possible by giving away everything extra I receive to the poor/homeless/etc as a result of this giving.

But the fact is (if you believe what scripture says about karma) it's a law. It works whatever your motivation. It just works small if you have a small, self-serving mind. And it works big if you are thinking in a big way (meaning thinking about how you can serve others with whatever comes your way - time, money, a smile, a place on line in front of you at the bank, etc). Giving is also not just money. Buddhist scripture says there are four main categories of giving: material things, protection from fear, love, and spiritual guidance.

I think alot of women here have spoken really nicely of how they give in the other three categories and not just the material things. Yay for our generous hearts!
post #39 of 43

We do...

We tithe 10% off the top, before taxes. I also give to other areas, but to be honest, not a lot...it is hard. But this year I've given to many charities because of all the disasters going on.

I give 10% because God directed me too and I am a Christian...I do not believe it makes me a better person than anybody else and, although I have been a Christian a long time, I have not always tithed...It was placed on my heart to do so the last few years though. It is not easy, but I know it is as necessary as any other bill I pay (more so).

God doesn't instruct me to do this to make my life harder, nor does he promise me riches in return.... I do know that he loves me and I will be cared for, not because I tithe exactly, but because I have enough faith in him to do what he asks. Even the stuff I don't understand....but I do understand tithing.

Anyway, that is what we do!

post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainbow
I hear what you are saying about tithing Kathirynne, but really I think tithing would have been constraining on me. For a long time I gave of my time and nto money, because I was young, single, and broke. It woudl have constrained me in that tithing is very specifically to give money, and not in other ways. Now it would constrain me because we would be, out of habit or obligation, be giving 10 percent of our budget.. instead of the 30 percent we came to without a set standard set before us.
In Christian teaching, the tithe (10%) is a baseline for giving. It would never be considered a 'constraint'. I've never been at a church that would turn away more, or fail to request it.

Rabbithorns, to answer your question... Yes. We budget giving at the baseline 10% to our church (which we regularly exceed for fund drives, angel tree, food pantry... and donations of time and talents), and another flexible percentage (probably between 3-5%) for our favorite charities (i.e. Heifer, Mercy Home for Girls and Boys, Probe Center Austin, Habitat, etc...).
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