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Uh oh, false marketing on G diapers!!!??????? - Page 2

post #21 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serenity Now
I also thought that toxic shock syndrome was caused by staphylococcus aureus, which would multiply in menstrual flow, so if you didn't change your tampons enough you were at a higher risk of developing this. I'd love to be further educated on the subject since I am having a hard time finding the research that I'm looking for (always trying to justify cloth to dh, you know ).
You are correct. TSS is caused by S. aureus. Sodium polyacrylate was voluntarily removed from tampons because of concerns about the increase in incidence of TSS. However, there are no studies that have actually found a cause and effect relationship between the two. S. aureus is present in the vagina already. The research suggests a few things. One being that the sodium polyacrylate allowed women to leave the tampons in too long. Also that when they were left in so long, they expanded to the point that they were actually leaving microscopic tears in the vaginal wall which allowed the S. aureus to enter the blood stream. So it isn't that the sodium polyacrylate actually caused TSS, it is that it made the conditions very, very favorable for the bacteria to multiply and then infect the body.

That being said, there have been no long-term studies studying its use in diapers and I wouldn't let it get near my baby's bum!!!
post #22 of 212
How disappointing that something marketed as environmentally friendly, and a clever concept, contains bleached wood pulp and sodium polyacrylate. Now if they had made the flushable liner out of unbleached recycled paper, that would be pretty environmentally friendly, IMO, because it would be stimulating the market for recycled products. And then it would be safe to compost (pee dipes of course)...

Quote:
I mean, think about it? How is flushing saving water?
Uh, yeah, I think about this everytime I rinse and flush one of my toddler's poops too...

But yeah, clearly the G-dipes are not a very environmentally friendly product... and they would surely clog the pipes of any of the old houses I've lived in!
post #23 of 212
Tell me about it!Our pipes get clogged when our toilet eats wipes or doublersAnd it has quite an appetite for them

I just don't see how using wood pulp for a diaper screams"environmentally friendly" I mean, deforesting for the point of using and recycling? On purpose? When a much more reasonable response would be to use washable cloth?
post #24 of 212
Well, there is a BIG difference when you are CLAIMING something and ACTUALLY DOING IT!!

And to think I actually was looking into them. But I thought the same thing about flushing my toilet. Being that I have a 30+ year old house.. I don't need another excuse for a clogged toilet! :

"If you can't walk the walk, then don't talk the talk" as my grandfather always said!!
post #25 of 212
Experience that I had with a crapy plastic cover by Gerber when my baby was just born that I bought whether in Walmart or Target (can’t remember where exactly) made me to give up on cloth diapering for 2 months!

I was hoping to use prefolds that I bought when I was pregnant and I was told that I need to buy a cover in order to use them. Well, having no clue about cloth diapers and everything that has to do with it, I, of course, went to a nearest store and bought the “cover” : ! That was the only cover available there and of course I assumed that this is just the way all covers are! How little did I know that time! Now I can not imagine anybody using this horrible horrible horrible piece of plastic for their baby’s gentle butt !

Anyway, it just makes me mad that this crap that made it to the huge corporation while tons of wonderful diapers did not, made me using disposables (I used “Seventh Generation” and “Tushies”) with my baby for his first 2 months of life ! Yuck! Good thing that I met people who opened my eyes on this wonderful thing – cloth diapering and I just LOVE it!

I hope that one day I have another baby and then I can do it right from the get-go! So only the softest organic cotton and velour will touch my baby’s silky skin and only nice soft organic wool will be used as a wonderful breathable cover !
post #26 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by odenata
from gdiapers.com (emphasis added):


In just 50-150 days, you can have sodium polyacrylate veggies to feed your children! Yum!
:Puke
post #27 of 212
Quote:
What's up with Whole Foods selling gdiapers but not any real cds? Just pfs and bummis would be nice.
I totally agree. When we were in the UK last Christmas, the regular grocery store carried Motherease OS and airflow covers!!!

How 'bout we start a campaign to ask Whole Foods to start carrying prefolds, snappis, and Bummis... and maybe Bumkins AIOs, Fuzzibunz, and Motherease products (just thinking of a few basic things that would cover the different kinds of cloth diapering options)?? Some Whole Foods stores carry organic clothes and housewares, so the idea isn't totally farfetched... and I think it's more likely that Whole Foods would do this than Babies R Us (though that would be even better).
post #28 of 212
[QUOTE=wawoof]

Uh, yeah, I think about this everytime I rinse and flush one of my toddler's poops too...

QUOTE]


Off topic but........Oh goody, a great environmental reason for not rinsing our dipes. I usually push it off if it is solid enough, but even at 18mos and eating all solids dd's are rarely solid enough to push off, so in the pail they go. I have some stains, but our dipes smell fine and I am saving water!!!
post #29 of 212
Our baby is 8m.o. and his loose breastfed poop goes into his cute little potty for few months now . So, it's definitely a great water saving thing and our diapers smell great and stay stains free !
post #30 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yulia_R
Our baby is 8m.o. and his loose breastfed poop goes into his cute little potty for few months now
You have a special place for the poop? You don't just put it in the toilet or straight into the washer? I'm new to CDing and haven't heard of this - can you elaborate?

Thanks!
post #31 of 212
My baby actually poops on the potty since 5 months of age. Before that he did it in the sink pretty often, but diapers would still get some as he was pooping ALOT (about 12-15 times a day).
But since I introduced him a potty when he was about to turn 5m.o. he started pooping on the potty .
post #32 of 212
Not trying to be the devil's advocate here. But I have a friend who was using sposies and switched to these. They are *still* better than sposies. I am very disappointed that they are in the stores when cloth has been gaining interest for so long and is not in there...
Just a thought.
post #33 of 212
Hello,
I have been using cloth now for 18 mos on my son. Recently, under the advice of his pediatric urologist, we had to stop using cloth. His urethral opening got scar tissue from some sort of rubbing a while back. He went through a minor surgery and we are now sort of cloth-scared.

Anyway, he's been in sposies and I recently found this product. It is a good middle ground for me. First, I am not opposed to (after doing my research) using SAP. I am admittedly, probably much more mainstream than most here. I just haven't found anything that makes me believe it will be detrimental to my son. Second, if this product works for us, I plan to compost. So no extra water required other than flushing poopies which I do anyway. No, I'm not growing my kids carrots with them...but I like to flower garden and see no reason not to use this. SAP is found in many potting soils and actually reduces the need to water as often.

But what bothers me most about some posts here is the "us" against "them" tone. I just look at the big picture....those of us cding are in the minority. So if this product can just even get people thinking about the cost of diapering our kids on the environment...to me it is worth-while. In my research of this product, I've seen numerous discussion boards with the CEO of g diapers personally answering questions. It is my personal impression that these are parents who tried cloth and found another option that is at least more eco-friendly than disposables. And that to me is commendable. Just my humble mainstream-ish-ness opinion.
post #34 of 212
I can see why people are coming down on these pretty hard-it is a CD board-but it seemed like a "not as good as cloth, but better than disposables" option to me when I heard about them. At least poop will be going in the toilet, whereas with disposables almost EVERYONE just throws it in the trash.

To say that they are superior to CDs for environmental reasons is laughable IMO but not because of the flushing. Everyone with toddlers flushes their poop in addition to washing each load twice. (In most cases I'd imagine) For me the washing or flushing isn't really the issue at stake, the problem is the very idea of a disposable product using less resources than a reusable one. Consider how much water and gas and other resources (and chemicals) are used to produce just one of the inserts and get it to consumers on the shelves. And then after its bought it gets tossed and the next time around you do the whole process over. Whereas with cloth that chain of production is cut back severely since you buy and re-use. We don't have to grow more cotton, mill it, cut it, sew it and ship it each time a baby poops or pees! And to think that disposable companies make washing and water use the issue-give me a break. It clearly seems like an attempt to distract from the more serious issue of how much energy and resources are actually being consumed by the production of each diaper.
post #35 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamamoo
Not trying to be the devil's advocate here. But I have a friend who was using sposies and switched to these. They are *still* better than sposies.
You know, I kinda wonder if they really are better than using, say, Tushies. It seems to me that it's probably about the same in terms of waste, really, the only advantage being that the solid waste goes to the correct place. (Of course, it says on most sposies packages to dump the waste, but I don't know anyone that does.)

Also, I'm really turned off by how much they are charging for these and the dubious claims they make. It seems like they are trying to take advantage of enviromentally-minded mamas, and I don't like that.

As for the SAP, I found this to be an interesting link...it's one of many similar ones I found on what safety measures to take when working with SAP:

Quote:
Eyes
Use chemical safety goggles and/or full face shield where dusting or splashing of solution is possible. Maintain eye wash fountain and quick-drench facilities in work area.

Skin
Wear protective gloves and clean body-cover clothing.

Respiratory
Wear a self-contained breathing apparatus and full protective gear.

Effects:
Inhalation: Causes irritation to respiratory tract. Symptoms may include coughing, shortness of breath.
Ingestion: Causes irritation to the gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.
Eyes: Causes irritation, redness and pain
Skin: Causes irritation to skin. Symptoms include redness, itching and pain.
I have a hard time thinking that this substance is something I want near my baby or in my garden. I know it's been declared "safe" by the powers that be, but they've been wrong so many times before, I'd much rather err on the side of caution.
post #36 of 212
I saw these at Whole Foods the day they came out and was intrigued. I didn't realize they use bleached wood pulp AND SAP. Yeesh.

I think they are better than sposies, but only just barely. The sad thing is that they might be turning mothers away from cloth

It would be a lot more socially responsible of Whole Foods to sell some prefolds and covers! I wish they would. I KNOW people would buy them. Well, they sell cloth menstrual pads (Glad Rags) at my Whole Foods so maybe that dream isn't far off...
post #37 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by bratmobile
I can see why people are coming down on these pretty hard-it is a CD board-but it seemed like a "not as good as cloth, but better than disposables" option to me when I heard about them. At least poop will be going in the toilet, whereas with disposables almost EVERYONE just throws it in the trash.

To say that they are superior to CDs for environmental reasons is laughable IMO but not because of the flushing. Everyone with toddlers flushes their poop in addition to washing each load twice. (In most cases I'd imagine) For me the washing or flushing isn't really the issue at stake, the problem is the very idea of a disposable product using less resources than a reusable one. Consider how much water and gas and other resources (and chemicals) are used to produce just one of the inserts and get it to consumers on the shelves. And then after its bought it gets tossed and the next time around you do the whole process over. Whereas with cloth that chain of production is cut back severely since you buy and re-use. We don't have to grow more cotton, mill it, cut it, sew it and ship it each time a baby poops or pees! And to think that disposable companies make washing and water use the issue-give me a break. It clearly seems like an attempt to distract from the more serious issue of how much energy and resources are actually being consumed by the production of each diaper.
Yep, exactly! This is what really bothers me about them (and sposies), yet most people don't realize just how much it takes to make one. And cotton is much easier to grow than trees, not to mention the plastics that have to be made for them. And all the other chemicals needed to put the diaper together. Then it just gets tossed full of urine & feces to sit in the landfill for 500 years while the chemicals leach into the groundwater. I wish more "mainstream" parents would just open their eyes for a minute & THINK about what they doing. But that's just wishful thinking . They are usually too infatuated with themselves to really think about what's best for their kids.
post #38 of 212
well, I started using gdiapers and that is how I came to use cloth. I do believe they are better than the big-brand disposable diapers. and probably that anyone using them will quickly come to the conlusion, as I did, that cloth was just as easy or easier

FTR they are bleached but using non-chlorine bleaching methods, and the wood pulp is farmed, not deforested (well I guess it is deforested but the "forest" was just planted not a natural forest)

Of course they are out to make money - as is any company - but they do seem like they are trying to do better than the big 'sposie companies.
post #39 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Talula Fairie
I saw these at Whole Foods the day they came out and was intrigued. I didn't realize they use bleached wood pulp AND SAP. Yeesh.

I think they are better than sposies, but only just barely. The sad thing is that they might be turning mothers away from cloth

It would be a lot more socially responsible of Whole Foods to sell some prefolds and covers! I wish they would. I KNOW people would buy them. Well, they sell cloth menstrual pads (Glad Rags) at my Whole Foods so maybe that dream isn't far off...


I don't think they are better than disposables. My son had SEVERE reactions to the chlorine in our disposables up until he was 2 months old and I had done my research and had enough cd's to start on CD'ing completely. Seventh Generation has unbleached diapers and no chlorine was used, so I would still wager those as safer. You have no idea what a horrible toxic effect bleached paper products against your skin, when wet with urine, or against food, can cause.
post #40 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leilalu
I don't think they are better than disposables. My son had SEVERE reactions to the chlorine in our disposables up until he was 2 months old and I had done my research and had enough cd's to start on CD'ing completely. Seventh Generation has unbleached diapers and no chlorine was used, so I would still wager those as safer. You have no idea what a horrible toxic effect bleached paper products against your skin, when wet with urine, or against food, can cause.
the gdiapers don't use chlorine bleaching though.
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