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Nutrition/Immunology 101. Sticky please. - Page 2

post #21 of 1098
I would recomend people read The Answer to Crib Death
“Sudden Infant Death Syndrome” (SIDS)
by Joseph G. Hattersley

Its about nutrition and and the problems deficiencies cause.

Its a long but worth while read IMO.

Section 3.6 is about vaccines
post #22 of 1098
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chlobo
Now, two questions for MT:

1. Is there a particular kind of probiotic you recommend to start your yogurt culture?
Well, I use this one for two reasons. I'm friends with the person that owns the company and know where their sources come from and have seen the testing results that show this brand to be the best on our market. Shelf yoghurt is a waste of time.

I've not yet tried making yoghurt from the yoghurt this makes, because I don't need to. On this page here:

http://www.easiyo.com/shop/catalog/d...php?cPath=6_13

I combine the first two. I have two makers, and put half and half into glass jars, and make it that way. REason... boysenberry on its own, though sweetened with honey powder, is too sweet for me. Plain is too bland. The mix is just right.

What you have in your country, I don't know.

Quote:
And can we get anough good gut flora from merely eating yogurt or drinking kefir?
Kefir doesn't have lacto in it, so while it's great for all the others, it lacks that one, which is why russians eat matsoni as well becuase that is lacto..
Quote:
What kind of probiotic would you recommend for folks who can't tolerage dairy?
Pass? Kimchi? naturally fermented krauts?

sourdough bread? Naturally fermented beers, wines meads, hooches, whatever.??? "Wild fermentation" by Katz is a good book, as is Nourishing traditions. In terms of sourdough breads Ed woods "Classic Sourdoughs" is one..but my favourite sourdough bread texts are: Peter Reinhart's "The Bread Baker's Apprentice, Bernard Claryton's "The Breads of France". Nancy Silverton's "Breads from La Brea Bakery" and if you think I have a shelf of bread making books you would be correct.

Quote:
As an aside, one of the natural healthcare practitioners I saw said that yogurt & kefir don't provide *enough* good bacteria and that an actual supplement is necessary. Any thoughts?
In day to day life, if you eat a broad range of probiotic foods you will have enough. But after an antibiotic series I would go for the big guns, using mega capsules with large numbers, and wash it down with Yakult which is Lacto Casei shirota strain which is resistant to gut acid...

Quote:
2. What is sprouting? I've heard you refer to that a couple of times and I guess I"m confused.
Sprouted radishes, broccoli, red clover, alfalfa, maybe mung beans...

You can sprout any seeds, and they are very high in vitamins, minerals and enzymes.

You can also sprout barley and make malted barley, dry it out, then grind it, and it adds a lot of flavour to bread.
post #23 of 1098
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by momto l&a
I would recomend people read The Answer to Crib Death
“Sudden Infant Death Syndrome” (SIDS)
by Joseph G. Hattersley

Its about nutrition and and the problems deficiencies cause.

Its a long but worth while read IMO.

Section 3.6 is about vaccines
Off to find a new book....

Yum.
post #24 of 1098
Ohh dear! I forgot to put the link. Its not a book MT, just a paper.I am sorry.

http://www.seanet.com/~alexs/ascorba...v8-n4-p229.htm
post #25 of 1098
Thread Starter 
Hmmm tricky. Can't find that at usual sources.... hmmm...where did you get it?
post #26 of 1098
Thread Starter 
I found this: http://www.seanet.com/~alexs/ascorba...v8-n4-p229.htm

He's very much on the same wave length as I think, though I'm not a supporter of the covered mattress theory...
post #27 of 1098
Thread Starter 
Okay, I don't need more than the above, because I've read most of the literature mentioned... it's a good enough summary on its own, and it has enough links to go sideways... and research each one. It's a pretty good summary really. A good chew.
post #28 of 1098
Thread Starter 
Oh,ping. I missed your post, and keeping the page open meant it didn't come up until I went righout out and came back. Sorry... how to drive everyone nuts..
post #29 of 1098
Ah tis my fault, kids need everything all at once and I plum forgot to put in the addy
post #30 of 1098
For the person who said they get the same CAA stuff here in the states: there are a few different items on the Seamins list - which one is comparable?

Jenn
post #31 of 1098
subbing

Hoping to find the time to read this soon...
post #32 of 1098
Quote:
Originally Posted by rabrog
For the person who said they get the same CAA stuff here in the states: there are a few different items on the Seamins list - which one is comparable?

Jenn
Aussie Pure Seaminerals http://seamineral.com/liquid.asp the top one.
post #33 of 1098
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momtezuma Tuatara
Well, I use this one for two reasons. I'm friends with the person that owns the company and know where their sources come from and have seen the testing results that show this brand to be the best on our market. Shelf yoghurt is a waste of time.

I've not yet tried making yoghurt from the yoghurt this makes, because I don't need to. On this page here:

http://www.easiyo.com/shop/catalog/d...php?cPath=6_13

I combine the first two. I have two makers, and put half and half into glass jars, and make it that way. REason... boysenberry on its own, though sweetened with honey powder, is too sweet for me. Plain is too bland. The mix is just right.
Thanks for starting this informative link, MT. I am still digesting much of it. But the portion above on yogurt caught my attention. I currently make homemade yogurt and use a store-bought yogurt as a starter. I'm happy with the consistency of the yogurt and taste, but I'd like to be more assured that I'm getting a good probiotic product. So here are my questions (forgive me if they seem completely elementary):

1) I use store-bought yogurt as my starter. Does this mean that the yogurt I make from that store-bought starter is a "waste of time?" Or were you just saying that eating store-bought yogurt itself is a waste of time. I guess I wonder if the fact that I am fermenting my own yogurt for many hours 9and, hopefully, brewing up good beasties), makes up for the fact that I used store-bought starter. I wondering whether I'm growing enough good beasties by virtue of the fact that I am fermenting the stuff myself - even if it did start with store-bought stuff which is a "waste of time" if eaten on its own.

2) The link that you provided above to the easiyo site is confusing me a bit. Can you explain to me what, exactly, it is that I'm looking at here: http://www.easiyo.com/shop/catalog/d...php?cPath=6_13
Those are yogurt starters, right? Are they dry or wet? Piggybacking onto my question 1 above, using a package of this, instead of a store-bought yogurt, as a starter would enhance my chances of having a really good probiotic product when I'm done fermenting my yogurt - is that what you're saying?

Thanks for any guidance you can provide!
post #34 of 1098
Quote:
Originally Posted by uccomama
Aussie Pure Seaminerals http://seamineral.com/liquid.asp the top one.
Is this safe to take while pregnant and/or nursing? Also, do your children take it too? What kind of dosage? I'm totally interested in purchasing some but wanted to make sure I could take it, and that my boys could take it too (not that it wouldn't be good for my dh, but it would be nice if it benefitted us all ).
post #35 of 1098
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyLittleWonders
Is this safe to take while pregnant and/or nursing? Also, do your children take it too? What kind of dosage? I'm totally interested in purchasing some but wanted to make sure I could take it, and that my boys could take it too (not that it wouldn't be good for my dh, but it would be nice if it benefitted us all ).
I would say absolutely yes. There is no CYA statement cautioning pregnant or lactating women on the label. An adult takes one teaspoon a day in water or juice (warning doesn't taste great). Children just need five drops in juice or water, as they need so much less they won't be able to taste it!
post #36 of 1098
Quote:
Originally Posted by uccomama
I would say absolutely yes. There is no CYA statement cautioning pregnant or lactating women on the label. An adult takes one teaspoon a day in water or juice (warning doesn't taste great). Children just need five drops in juice or water, as they need so much less they won't be able to taste it!
Thanks! I'm going to order it.
post #37 of 1098
Do you think that we can rely on our cravings as a guide to what we are deficient in? For example, I crave spinach, mushrooms, berries, and rich meat (ham, pork, beef). I see those listed as positive foods in MT's posts.
post #38 of 1098
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momtezuma Tuatara
.

Little tip here.

Glutathion pathway is one of the biggest reasons you should never ever use tylenol. It bombs out the glutathione circuits. And if you get hormonal headaches, you will get a rebound one after tylenol, because your glutathione metabolism is funked out.

...
So how long does this "funked out" effect last? This describes me perfectly. I was an Excedrin junkie in grad school, in order to keep my constant headaches at bay enough to function. Interestingly, I had to stop taking birth control pills at the same time because the headaches were horrid. But, that was 15 years ago, and ten years before my first child. Now I am one PMS/PPD hormonal mess, and, chronically anemic too. I am thinking there might be some connection...

There is so much to know about nutrition I sometimes don't know where to begin. Thanks for this thread. I think I have a rudimentary understanding of about 50% of what you said, but I am working on the rest of it.
post #39 of 1098
MT - if we have the proper levels for our bodies of selenium, S.A., Vit. E, B vitamins ... will the glutathione take care of itself? Or do we need to supplement that too? Oh, and how much cysteine is good to take? The nutritional yeast I slug down has 60 mg of it per serving ... ahh ... so much to learn (but all so fascinating!).
post #40 of 1098
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galatea
Do you think that we can rely on our cravings as a guide to what we are deficient in? For example, I crave spinach, mushrooms, berries, and rich meat (ham, pork, beef).
This opens up a whole huge field that is barely touched by science.
Maybe you will find interesting this link: http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/...graw_eat2.html

I probably don't fit into this thread (I have an unfinished discussion with MT on this...), but I'd like to simply point to the existence of an entirely different angle to the nutrition issue (which, of course, is connected to immunity and everything else in us).
When I started to research nutrition I had a big puzzle: why is it that we have to read somewhere what we should eat to be healthy? Why are we not very healthy if we simply listen to what our body says?
I reached a very interesting and unexpected answer: it's because we eat cooked food. If we ate only raw food (preferably from infancy) our food instinct would be intact, we would be in close contact with our body's needs in the same way that all wild animals are. There is no (or very little) degeneration of the human species, all the proper senses are there!
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