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Homeschooling Preschoolers March06 - Page 5

post #81 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillian J


Why ? Is he going to be more intellectually capable when he's, say...16 if he started to learn the 3Rs at 4 instead of 6 or 7 even later? Couldn't he learn it all a lot faster and easier - and more meaningfully - at an older age when there are more meaningful things to apply it to? [hint: yes!]



Okay - - slow down! There - how's that?
- Lillian
I think this is a typical case of "unschooling the parent", eh Lillian

And trust me, mampoppins, I think we have all felt the same at one point
post #82 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunRayeMomi
And trust me, mampoppins, I think we have all felt the same at one point

Oh, absolutely! And I hope my teasing didn't imply otherwise. I've certainly done my share of hand-wringing (my son could testify to that and have you chortling with laughter ); and I can't think of any homeschooler I know who hasn't at one time or another. I'll bet that even official school teachers go through that. I must say that I didn't start early, though, because my son was in Waldorf for two years of kindergarten, and one of the things I really liked was their late introduction of the 3Rs. There were a whole lot of other things I didn't like, so we went elsewhere for 1st grade. At that time, there weren't the pressures in even public kindergartens that there are now, though. - Lillian
post #83 of 146
OTMomma- and for math, don't forget puzzles!!

Lillian-I think the reason I keep feeling this way is for two reasons. The first being that he sometimes asks to do school. So I get out what we call his school in a box. It has counting bears and cups,lacing board, beads to string,puzzles,his own "utensil"box(crayons,golf pencils,markers,scissors,eraser) a baggy full of stickers, and small size tablets of construction paper. And another little bag with small bits of paper for him to glue onto larger paper.

And so far he is totally satisfied with that.....

Except it is just such a *different* experience from dd. Back at that age for her, I had our home set up in a Montessori way, but with lots of Waldorfish materials. Dd just asked us to show her how to write her name. She was constantly playing with ABC fridge magnets,was doing 50-100 piece puzzles by herself,etc...Ithink she would have read at 5, but I was of the unschooling mind then, and read to her without *teaching* her phonics,etc..

But I must admit, when I hear of so many preschoolers writing their own name,counting to 100,etc...there's a part of me that wants to introduce that stuff to ds in a sit down way.

Just the other day, I ordered a number and alphabet puzzle for him. Dd started trying to teach him, and he grabbed the small case letters and started using them in his backhoe/frontloader!

Since he will be 5 this summer, I really have 2 more years before I have to answer to our state's regulations.

Coming here has helped so much for me, as I tend to preach and sometimes not practice!

mp (Hey!Lillian my head hurts! )
post #84 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamapoppins
I think she would have read at 5, but I was of the unschooling mind then, and read to her without *teaching* her phonics,etc..
Hm... Well, maybe we're not talking about the same thing, but my son thrived on phonics, because he's the type of person who needs to know the code of things. And then he took off on his own and taught himself to read things he wanted to read - like Nintendo Power Guides . I guess maybe you're referring to not wanting to do "lessons" with her. But I taught him in a very short period right before he was about to go into a little school where all the 1st graders would already have known how to read 3 letter words - so he was almost 7 at the time. Actually, I knew so little at the time that once I'd taught him the letter sounds, I took him to a tutor for a while who was a former kindergarten teacher. That was absolutely unnecessary and not a great experience - she was pushy with him. It's one of those things I'd do very differently if I had it to do over. Most things can be taught just by telling/showing/exposing rather than through lessons - but I think phonics are a great tool for lots of people. That was certainly true for me when I learned to read. - Lillian
post #85 of 146
Happy St. Patrick's Day! If any of you are trying to think of things to do today- googling for preschool activies gave me tons of ideas for things to do today. I should have thought about this before today- as some things would have been more cool if I'd done prep... but I'm trying. Part of our preschool plan for this year has been to celebrate all the small holidays, I often forget. So today we've talked about Ireland and Leprochans, colored/glued together shamrocks and put on green clothes.
post #86 of 146
OK, Lillian,
You seem to me very much a teacher on this list or these boards, because you have been thru all of this while we are allat the beginning and struggling with knowing what where how much etc. I need advice, and having read many of your posts, value your ideas.
I have a 3.5 year old boy. He heavily likes phonics, he chants sounds and tries to sound things out all day long, words that he sees around him everywhere. He counts, does simple addition, which started with cheerios and cookies and M&M's . Currently he loves french videos, is counting to 10 in english and french in a singsong way and loves the magic schoolbus and anything dinosaurs and space related. He thinks reading is a secret code and that he is "saving the world". I try to let him lead, but am often saying no, we will do it tomorrow, its too late, or I am too tired or whatever. But I do try to constantly have things out to interest him obviously. Everytime I talk to my own mom she warns me against pushing him, and I am trying not too, but he is only 3.5 and trying to charge ahead. He wont however do anything that involves anykind of pencil/crayon work or scissors. But then again he loves picking things up with chopsticks!?!
How much is too much at this age, and should I let him go with it or try to slow him down more.
He does also spend time playing superhero, and building with legos, blocks etc, and when its not raining loves to be outside, but it rains alot and when he is inside he wants to do letter games all the time. We go regularly to play places with other kids and he interacts with them quite well, usually when there are problems its because he wants to hug everyone and they dont always like being hugged...
So how much is too much at this age? How much leading do you let them do?
Nini
post #87 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by nini2033a
So how much is too much at this age? How much leading do you let them do?
Nini, thanks so much for the vote of confidence - every child and situation is so unique though... You son sounds so cute - and it sounds as if he's having a ball! I'm afraid I don't understand your concern - you don't seem to be pushing him - he seems to be pushing himself, which doesn't seem to be harming him any. You have a lot of nice resources around, and he seems to be enjoying them to the max. It seems to be working out fine except for running you into the ground . You did mention that he won't do anything involving pencils/crayons or scissors, so it seems as if you've felt maybe he should? But I can't imagine any reason why he'd need to. Sounds as if he has more than enough going on without needing to get into any of that.

I'm a little confused as to why your mom is warning you not to push him, and you're saying you're "trying" not to - because you didn't say anything that sounds as if you are pushing him. It sounds as if he's following his own lead and thriving at it. - Lillian
post #88 of 146
IA with Lillian. There's a really big difference between pushing a child and a child pulling you along! But to the outside world, they usually look the same (i.e. both look like pushing). I also have a child that drags me along, but I get lots of comments about how much I must work with him, about children being just children, etc etc. I think you should just follow his lead and let him continue to pull you around. Let people think whatever they want; you know it's pull and not push. By letting him lead, regardless of how incredibly ambitious it is, you're reinforcing his self-motivation and creativity, both very sought after qualities in the world today. He sounds adorable, btw.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillian J


Nini, thanks so much for the vote of confidence - every child and situation is so unique though... You son sounds so cute - and it sounds as if he's having a ball! I'm afraid I don't understand your concern - you don't seem to be pushing him - he seems to be pushing himself, which doesn't seem to be harming him any. You have a lot of nice resources around, and he seems to be enjoying them to the max. It seems to be working out fine except for running you into the ground . You did mention that he won't do anything involving pencils/crayons or scissors, so it seems as if you've felt maybe he should? But I can't imagine any reason why he'd need to. Sounds as if he has more than enough going on without needing to get into any of that.

I'm a little confused as to why your mom is warning you not to push him, and you're saying you're "trying" not to - because you didn't say anything that sounds as if you are pushing him. It sounds as if he's following his own lead and thriving at it. - Lillian
post #89 of 146
Nini- I have that problem with my dd that she is constantlyl trying to hug other children! Isn't it the weirdest problem? Dd also wants to go up to everyone's stroller and hug their babies! Try to take joy from having such a loving child. And I agree you are doing a great job- just follow his lead.
post #90 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by OTMomma
Nini- I have that problem with my dd that she is constantlyl trying to hug other children! Isn't it the weirdest problem? Dd also wants to go up to everyone's stroller and hug their babies! Try to take joy from having such a loving child. And I agree you are doing a great job- just follow his lead.
BeanBean was like that. We had to explain to him that a) just because a child was his size didn't mean that child was his *age* (he often expects 20 month old children to talk because they're as big as he is ) and b) not every child (or adult) wants to talk to him every time. He's become much more respectful of other people's boundaries over the past 6-9 months.
post #91 of 146
I guess my concern is that maybe I am pushing him without realizing it. Maybe he is doing this to try to please me? Because I do tell him how wonderful he is doing and how smart he is when he gets something new, like the other day when he sounded out exit and remembered that I told him months ago that it meant to go out. Now he reads every exit sign, and I always praise him. I dont know, I guess my mom threw me for a loop when I laughingly told her not only were we doing addition problems in the car, but we had just been listening to french music so we were doing them in french, (keeping in mind we still count on our fingers) and she was almost livid. Why in God's name would I even do that with a 3 year old, what in the world did he need with numbers and counting???? Was I nuts!
I know many people on this list are totally unschoolers and dont believe in introducing this stuff to the kids so early, but if they ask for it all day long? literally first thing in the morning after "Moo-milk" and the last thing in bed at night?

And, yes, I have tried, (like when we were at restaurants with kid menus) to get him to color, but he wont. His idea of coloring is for him to dictate to me what color goes where and have me do it. And I have had items available at home in case he was interested, but they are usually used by the middle child (15 year old DD).

Anyway, so I was beginning to doubt myself after the diatribe from my mother. Thanks for all your replies. I think I need to find a local HS support group even though he is so young, and we have several friends not yet in the local school system, although they will eventually all be sucked in. But I should be making other HS contacts early so he wont miss all his friends when they suddenly disappear in another year.
Nini
post #92 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by nini2033a
...and I always praise him...
Ah! Well, there's an interesting article online by Alfie Kohn:
Five Reasons to Stop Saying "Good Job!". It could very well be, as you say, that you've been driving some of this without meaning to, just from putting a lot of value on it - but it's pretty hard to tell that from a few paragraphs online. My concern would be whether he's happy and thriving or if he feels pressured or frustrated for no good reason. Only you will be able to figure that out. It sounds, though, as if he's getting in lots of imaginative play and just looking for ongoing intellectual challenges as well.

Quote:
I dont know, I guess my mom threw me for a loop when I laughingly told her not only were we doing addition problems in the car, but we had just been listening to french music so we were doing them in french, (keeping in mind we still count on our fingers) and she was almost livid. Why in God's name would I even do that with a 3 year old, what in the world did he need with numbers and counting???? Was I nuts!
I know many people on this list are totally unschoolers and dont believe in introducing this stuff to the kids so early, but if they ask for it all day long? literally first thing in the morning after "Moo-milk" and the last thing in bed at night?
So, did he ask to do the addition problems in French? And how does he happen to know French? Is all this something he's also driving? Not introducing academic things too early is a whole different subject from unschooling, though. Even highly academic professionals and researchers - far from being unschoolers! - are concerned about things being introduced too early in today's preschools and kindergartens. But "introducing" things under those circumstances implies a certain amount of coercion. Unschoolers are more concerned about whether things are introduced in such a way as to make them feel like a necessity or something to please the parent, and/or presented in a schooley manner.

I'm wondering if you might benefit from reading some of the literature about "gifted" children:
Hoagies' Gifted Education Page

- Lillian
post #93 of 146
Can I ask a few questions about "gifted" children? I am starting to think that my DD is gifted (she will be 3 in April) in some ways. I am always hesitant to say that outloud, b/c I htink most parents must think their child is "gifted" but I was reading some info in the link posted above, and honestly, my DD does have several of the things mentioned, one of the most obvious and undeniable is her hitting milestones VERY early. She walked at 8.5 months, and was running around by 9.5 months. She talked VERY early, too, and by 15 months or so was using full sentances (not phrases, full regular adult sentances). Right now she is not quite 3, and uses very good grammar, sentance structure and seems to be able to understand most everything we have read to her. She also remembers almost everything that is ever said or read to her, even weeks or months later. One of the first signs of this is when a friend dropped by w/ her DD for only 5 minutes or so (she needed to use my computer to PP someone). It was also at the same time the PAT lady was coming over. The next time the PAT lady was over (2 months later, I think) DD said "Last time you were here Karen was here with her baby... What is her baby's name?... Hudson, Hudson is her baby's name. They were here last time you were here, Saundra" (PAT lady's name). This was almost a year ago! DD was just around age 2. And BTW, we have only been to see Hudson and Karen 2 times, ever. She is not a frequent friend or play mate. I talk to Karen mabye once every few weeks on the phone. Also, if anything is ever missing, we can ask DD where it is, and if she had it, or saw someone put it away, she can tell you immediately. The first time she did this was at about 9 months old. She was playing with my keys, and had lost them. I finally got down and asked her where the keys were (using another set as an example). She immediately walked to stove, pulled out the bottom drawer, removed 3 loaf pans, and pulled out the keys. She had sandwiched them between the pans. It would have taken me months to find them!

Okay, I'm sure you are all tired of me talking about my DD : anyway, how do I know if she is infact gifted? Does that mean anything? Am I supposed to be doing anything beyond just reading to her, and allowing her to explore the world? Also, I started to consider her "spirited" on the GD board, is this the same thing? Are spirited kids also gifted? And as a last question My new baby does not seem to be doing ANYTHING like this. Infact, she just took off walking well 2 days ago (she is 13.5 months). It's hard not to compare, but she only says 2 words (mama, dad), that's it! I am starting to worry that she is having some delays or somehting, but my ped assured me that she is just fine, and that DD#1 was just not a good comparison to the average kid. DD#2 is hitting her milestones in a regular and normal pattern, just not ahead. Has anyone else had a first child who just "got" everything? I often feel as though the baby doesn't understand what I am saying (well, she understands when I say "Get that out of your mouth") but I know that Lacy at this age always knew exactly what I was talking about. Is this going to cause some problems in the future? How do you go about parenting a "gifted" child? Or is my DD just a normal kid, and I'm just a crazy parent who wants to think my child is the smartest kid in the Universe
post #94 of 146
Free Thinker,

I hope you don't mind me putting my longish two cents in... I believe that both my kids are gifted for reasons too long to get into here, but I have subsequently read a lot about it. I don't talk about it very much, because the notion apparently offends many people. But I would like to take a shot at answering some of your questions, if you don't mind, because you have asked so sincerely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Free Thinker
Okay, I'm sure you are all tired of me talking about my DD :
She sounds wonderful. I'm really impressed by her verbal ability.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Free Thinker
1. anyway, how do I know if she is infact gifted?
You don't know for sure without testing, but research shows that parents are surprisingly accurate (84%) in identifying giftedness in their children (when they know what giftedness means, not confusing it with front-loading, achievement, etc). There's a great checklist here (broken link) that names the 84% statistic. http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/
What_is_Gifted/characgt.htm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Free Thinker
2. Does that mean anything?
Well, as you will see at Hoagies, giftedness is often described as asynchronous development. Some gifted kids don't really have issues with it. But many do have issues with having multiple stages of development at the same time. For example, my older son had gross motor delays as a result of his overwhelming preference as a toddler for doing sedentary activities. He also had difficulty relating to peers because he was not attracted to the same activities, although both these issues have greatly lessened with age. Many kids can intellectually grasp mature concepts, but since their emotional development may be age-appropriate, they subsequently have a hard time processing what they understand and this can translate to what looks like irrational behavior or immaturity. They can be 9yrs old in some situations, 2 in others, 4 in others, all at the same time. Understanding this can go a long way in helping your child cope. For me, personally, identifying the giftedness helped me to understand my older son, rule out potential misdiagnosis and help him navigate through life. With my younger son, it's basically a non-issue so far.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Free Thinker
3. Am I supposed to be doing anything beyond just reading to her, and allowing her to explore the world?
In my humble, personal opinion, no. I would just follow her lead and help her feed her interests. Understand that it can help gifted children to explore a topic in greater depth and complexity rather than trying to move ahead levels. But other people have different philosophies. Gifted or not, some will be unschoolers, some will do classical, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Free Thinker
4. Also, I started to consider her "spirited" on the GD board, is this the same thing? Are spirited kids also gifted?
Spirited kids are not necessarily gifted, but gifted kids can be spirited. Gifted kids often have "overexcitabilities" (search Dabrowski at Hoagies) due to their brain processing information differently. They tend to notice and rapidly process more information, which can translate into information overload (e.g. greater sensitivity to noise)...I can see how this could lead to a child being spirited.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Free Thinker
5. And as a last question My new baby does not seem to be doing ANYTHING like this. Infact, she just took off walking well 2 days ago (she is 13.5 months). It's hard not to compare, but she only says 2 words (mama, dad), that's it! I am starting to worry that she is having some delays or somehting, but my ped assured me that she is just fine, and that DD#1 was just not a good comparison to the average kid. DD#2 is hitting her milestones in a regular and normal pattern, just not ahead. Has anyone else had a first child who just "got" everything? I often feel as though the baby doesn't understand what I am saying (well, she understands when I say "Get that out of your mouth") but I know that Lacy at this age always knew exactly what I was talking about.
It's difficult to not compare children. I'm sure most of us do it unintentionally on some level. Your younger child may not be gifted, but you can't rule that out either. Anecdotally, both my kids were average on most gross motor skills and neither had early speech (one was late at 22 months). There are people who have had their children identified in school who literally had no idea. Some children are globally gifted and some are gifted in very specific areas. Both of my kids have strengths in patterns, numbers, construction, puzzles and fine motor areas. I do not think they are verbally gifted, but I guess I can't rule that out until they read. Your younger child may just present in a different way. You can see a lot of interesting diversity on gifted lists on the net; that always fascinates me.

And then there's the tendency, for various reasons, to not consider the younger sib as gifted. At the Gifted Center in Colorado, Linda Silverman had parents of highly gifted children bring in their "non-gifted" younger children. And they found that most of these children actually tested as gifted; siblings are usually within 5 or 10 points of each other in IQ. More on that here: http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/
What_is_Gifted/learned.htm

I never thought my younger son was gifted, because he didn't have the asynochronous issues that my older son did and because he did not demonstrate the academic milestones that my older son did. Then, a month or two after he turned 2, he started spontaneously writing letters. This morning, he was doing a section of a 100 piece puzzle. But I had previously been comparing him against his older brother and thinking, "Hmmm, ds1 knew the alphabet/was building Lego stuff by now..." They are just different people. Again though, there are many types of giftedness and various levels, so my situation may not have any relevance to someone else's and vice-versa. Giftedness presents with tremendous diversity.

Younger children often present differently, because older children (gifted or not) tend to be more achievement oriented. Also, wrt speech, lack of early speech does not translate to lack of giftedness. While early complex speech is usually considered a sign of giftedness, the inverse is not true: average or late speech do not rule out giftedness at all. It's too early to rule anything out. And if she's not gifted, then obviously that's great too. For various reasons, I have worried to death about my oldest. The gifted label that seemed to fit him was worrying to me, because of all the related issues. I have to admit that I was relieved that my second child didn't stick out like a sore thumb and that he was developing evenly. They are both a mixed bag. Kids are complex and have their own strengths and challenges. No matter what your younger child is like, you'll do fine. You will give them both what they need and treat them like the individuals they are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Free Thinker
6. Is this going to cause some problems in the future? How do you go about parenting a "gifted" child? Or is my DD just a normal kid, and I'm just a crazy parent who wants to think my child is the smartest kid in the Universe
It's hard to say if it's going to cause problems. All children, gifted or not, present their own unique challenges. Wrt giftedness, there can the asynchronous development issues previously noted. It's just too individual to say. For me, just understanding what "it" was was very helpful in understanding my child. I had also read about Asperger's, hyperlexia, apraxia, hyptonia, etc. And as I've said, it has been a non-issue so far with my younger child, because he doesn't seem to have those issues. But as they grow, we'll just have to see what happens and act accordingly.

To me, giftedness doesn't mean "smart" per se. All kids are special and their parents think they are amazing (as they should, b/c they are). But gifted children think differently. They learn rapidly and think divergently. They can be very stifled in situations where there's repetition and they can act out with their frustration. They can be very intense, highly creative, constantly questioning, very imaginative, very sensitive, persistently perfectionistic...And yeah, they can recall some crazy details from eons ago, as you've noted. There are some good checklists at Hoagies that may help you. With my own kids, we see rapid and spontaneous learning, when you find yourself asking your dh, "Did you teach her that? How long has she been doing that for?" There are other things, but I won't get into that here.

For me, personally, it helped to find some online support. It made me feel as though we were not alone in our challenges. It provided a safe haven to just talk about my kids the way that other people talk about theirs. It provided good information and ideas. It was like any other support group that people are attracted to. You might find this helpful.

There is a gifted group here, but there are many others on the net as well. They all have their unique feels and some people are happy in some groups and unhappy in others. I would recommend looking around and seeing what kind of vibe you get from that, see if it's where you feel comfortable, etc. They are definitely not all the same. There are some groups that feel like home to me and there are others that I just don't feel overly comfortable in. Just look around and see if any one group really appeals to you. Definitely read at Hoagies too.

Best of luck to you.
post #95 of 146
:

BeanBean spoke *very* early; BooBah, not so much. They just have different personalities, and while communicating with others was very important to my son right from the beginning, BooBah was more interested in exploring her environment on her own terms. On the other hand, BooBah's gross and fine motor development were both downright terrifying, while BeanBean did everything on the early side of average. Each child is different, they do different things for different reasons, and in a lot of ways development early on seems (in my opinion) to have a lot to do with personality, which is definately inborn to a great extent.
post #96 of 146
Well, my family is from Europe, andd we have always played with languages. I did get him the Muzzy french cartoon program because I try to speak french with him. I want him to be familiar with other languages. We regularly insert words in dutch, german, french, my DH a smattering of Arabic, my father some hebrew and my brother and his family throw in Chinese. So, yes, french was intentionally introduced, but just thru cartoons and lullabies. He picked up the counting and started doing the math using french numbers and french counting on his fingers.
He seems happy and well adjusted, he shares well, he loves playing with others, he did breast feed until 3, and he still sleeps in our bedroom, his choice, but is not clingy. When we are in a social situation, he happily waves byebye and runs to play.
I have 3 kids, and have always told them when they did new things well. I grew up with a father that nothing was ever good enough for, and as a result, got to the point where it was like, why bother trying, it will never be enough. But I also very conciously tell them when they have been not so good about something when I know that they have been lazy about trying. I dont want to go the other way and end up with a child who expects to be praised for every little thing either.
And we have always been a cuddly demostrative family, because again growing up, my Mom was very cuddly, and my father couldn't show any positive emotions. I clearly remember the first time when I was in highschool and decided I had had enough and I was going to get a hug goodnight. I stood in front of the news on TV and refused to move until he had given me a hug. I want my kids to always feel secure in my love and being proud of them.
Nini
post #97 of 146
Yikes! Those "characteristics of gifted children" fit my ds to a T. I think he is bright but wouldn't call him gifted, however. We went to a relatively mainstream christening and party today. Ds sure stood out of the crowd (not in a good way, more of a "that kid must have ADHD" sort of way).
post #98 of 146
The whole gifted issue is one reason why I want to homeschool. I consider my kids gifted in different ways (but DS definately more so). I know school cannot accommodate them. I want them here where they can learn on their own at their own pace and what they are intrested in while avoiding labels.

I have to hold myself back from pushing DS as he's so teachable but he's learning more on his own through discovery than I could ever teach him. I do some things, such as we're memorizing some scripture verses but he loves that (we do it at church anyway). He has an amazing memory and puts me to shame, lol!
post #99 of 146

I informally Homeschool

I have a 3 year old that I informally hs and since we don't live to far from Georgia, we took a big trip with my cousin and her hs 3 year old to the Atlanta Zoo and to the Big Aquarium also in Atlanta. Aside from looking like a traveling Circus (4 kids 3 and under between the 2 of us) we had a wonderful time, the girls really liked the animals, etc. We used the trip not only as a way to learn more about animals and fish and the oceans, and the continents, but since we traveld on Marta we also talked about public transit and polution, we also had a picnic in Olympic park so we got to talk about that as well. SO anyways we are focusing on these themes this month.
post #100 of 146
"Spirited kids are not necessarily gifted, but gifted kids can be spirited. Gifted kids often have "overexcitabilities" (search Dabrowski at Hoagies) due to their brain processing information differently. They tend to notice and rapidly process more information, which can translate into information overload (e.g. greater sensitivity to noise)...I can see how this could lead to a child being spirited.
"


Oh, this is so true.

I have one child that is very high needs/spirited, etc. The intensity, demandingness, persistance, activeness, sleep issues, etc... all still remains at 2. It's her temperment and personality... and her passion and persistance for something, I really thing is related to her advancedness as the previous poster mentions is possible. She knows what she wants. Has since about 6m, when she started throwing full-blown mini-tantrums, complete with throwing herself to the floor.

On the flip side, my supposedly 'low needs' or not-spirited child....yeah, not quite. She definitely isn't spirited, BUT when I first read Dabroski's overexcitabilities, EVERYTHING clicked for me. It defines her so well. Emotionally sensitive, (would cry at books, movies, etc)...and physically sensitive....hated sticky things, is always itchy, HATES anything in her face water especially, complains about the sun in her eyes.... she has a hard time expressing to her younger sister NOT to take things from her and just breaks down in seconds. She really hits almost all of the overexcitabilities dabroski lists.


So, two kids, both who I expect will fall in the gifted range somewhere, but interesting how one is 'spirited' and another nails virtually all the overexcitabilities. Hoagies is a good place to start.

Tammy
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