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How about a fermented veggies thread? - Page 12

post #221 of 341
just did my first ever batch of fermented veggies and I did just plain ol carrots (shredded) because my dp doesn't like ginger (I love it!). I tried it this morning and it was great! AND I even got my DP to eat it with his hashbrowns (a huge achievement) with a smile on his face! My DD tried it as well and was not so impressed but she's only 13mo, so we'll give her a little while to get used to it.
So, I'm going to keep going with it.
My step father is Italian and can get raw olives, so he and I are going to culture olives! i'm super excited to learn how to do this and he's going to teach me. I'll keep you all posted!
post #222 of 341
Tanya, I was under the impression that tomatoes counted as fruits and you needed the whey for them because of that, since it wasn't listed as optional. Being dairy-free, I take it you made the ketchup without whey? I suppose I'll just have to try it that way then. *winces at the cost of 24 ounces (3 cups) of store bought tomato paste, and really wishes she had bought the canning equipment to can tomatoes herself last summer* oh well, its on my to do list. Well, I suppose a quart of ketchup would last a while, and I do so want to try it. anyways.

mama meme, that sounds so good! home-cultured olives? yum.
post #223 of 341
I guess technically tomatoes are fruits, but the ketchup and the salsa recipes fermented fine without whey. NT had some recipes listed specifically as fruit recipes and specifically said not to do whey-less and the tomato-based ones weren't among those. The sugar content is lower than, say, trying to do something with berries or plums or something, maybe that's why they're different.
post #224 of 341
Lurker bump :
post #225 of 341
I think I figured out something really cool. I often put off making kimchee despite the fact that we really like it because the pounding to get the veggie juice out is a deterrent to lazy me (even mixing the salt in first and letting it sit, it still seems to need some help).

Well, I did the chopping and mixing it all together last night, but it was getting late, so I left it in the Pyrex bowls I'd been using for mixing and piled one on top of another--bottom bowl with veggies, another bowl with veggies on top, and then an empty Pyrex bowl topping it off. I put it in the frig like that, and this evening when I got back to it, it was really juicy! And the cabbage seemed fairly squished. So, this batch I just put into my quart jars and only needed to add a tiny bit of extra brine (maybe I could've gotten away without any, but I figured it'll expand with the fermentation) and if this works, life is sweet! And since my daughter is flying through our pickles (the only ferment I've got done right now) I may need to do this quite a bit more frequently than in the past.
post #226 of 341
Awesome, Tanya! What recipe did you use?

(By the way, have you enlisted help for the pounding? My DH is a sauerkraut making fiend lately, and he loves that part...)
post #227 of 341
I used the recipe in NT but without whey (or extra salt) and yellow onions instead of green. But I read Sandor Katz's recipe and it wasn't that different, the main difference seemed to be technique, with Katz pre-soaking in salty water and then fermenting with less salt. And I'm still not clear on why kimchee (real kimchee, i mean) is so stinky, but mine is not. Katz mentioned, in the discussion, not his recipe, that sometimes fish sauce is used traditionally--is that the only reason, d'ya think?

And no, I never considered outsourcing the pounding to my husband. I like that idea, though if this works, I'm probably going to stick with the lazy way. I also have trouble with time management, it gets to be 10pm and I'm not done.

What recipe do you use? Or recipes? Since I noticed the kimchee in your siggy...

Oh, and has anyone pickled garlic? The kids loved the garlic at the bottom of our cucumber pickles so much that I decided to do a special batch of just garlic... but the garlic has turned an odd blue/green color. I just covered the peeled garlic cloves with leftover pickle juice, but the garlic in the pickles wasn't this color. It really doesn't look or smell bad, well, except for looking blue/green which I can't tell if that's bad or not, but it was a salty brine full of bacteria, so it seems unlikely to have gone completely awry. Any ideas?
post #228 of 341
I found this link with a simple kimchi ferment in plastic ziploc-type bags. : http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/A...kura/index.php


Pat
post #229 of 341
Quick updates--the kimchee is really tasty, but as usual I was really bad about visualizing how many quarts it would make, so I added ginger, garlic and red pepper flakes for 4 quarts but only really ended up with 3. I like the level of garlic & ginger flavor, but this amount of red pepper flakes is a bit too spicy for the kids--I hope they either get used to it or it mellows in the frig.

I made the ginger/garlic carrots, but per a previous poster's suggestion, cut up the carrots instead of grating them. I cut them into ovals, seemed pretty and easy for the kids to eat. But I guess since they have less surface area than grated carrots, I should've used more garlic and ginger, because they're a bit bland in that area. But still tasty and worth eating--the kids are loving them.

My beet kvass is brewing, not exactly a tasty ferment but somehow that pond water taste (my husband's description) is appealing to me and it's been calling me for a while.

Oh, and earlier in the thread my green garlic question was answered. It's a chemical in the garlic that makes it turn green, so it's okay to eat. I am wondering if it's related to the fact that a lot of my garlic lately has been starting to sprout--not visible from the outside, but when I cut them open, there's a hint of green. But since _all_ my garlic has been like this, I just keep going with my recipes and use what I have. Because not all the garlic I've fermented (say at the bottom of a pickle jar) has turned green, even sitting in the pickle brine for a long time.
post #230 of 341
Well ladies you've convinced me! I've got a massive bowl of napa and another massive bowl of daikon all soaking in brine for the night. I made some fermented mung beans already and two BIG jars of pickled garlic.

About the garlic, the recipe I found was basically 1 cup soy sauce and fill the rest with rice vinegar, then let soak. Does this sound right? It's what I did, so hopefully I didn't kill it...

Anyways, I'll make up the kimchi and the daikon tomorrow, stay tuned for updates!
post #231 of 341
It sounds like you've got a source of recipes I don't know about. Everything I've done has been from Nourishing Traditions, Wild Fermentation, or this thread. Wow, that's really narrow now that I really think about it.

For my garlic, all I did was fill up a pint-size jar with garlic clove halves and then poured leftover cucumber pickle juice brine over it. But they really still need to mellow, they're too strong right now (but I'm wondering if that will happen--sorta makes sense that garlic in with cucumber pickles would mellow, but this is garlic with more garlic). I think we'll be waiting 3 months and then checking.

So where are you finding your recipes? And what's your recipe for kimchee? Sounds like a lot more daikon than I am using, which sounds interesting.
post #232 of 341
I have a Korean cookbook that's like my DH's food bible from home LOL

The daikon is for a daikon kimchi and a sweet pickle daikon, so two different kinds.
post #233 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by TanyaLopez View Post
And I'm still not clear on why kimchee (real kimchee, i mean) is so stinky, but mine is not. Katz mentioned, in the discussion, not his recipe, that sometimes fish sauce is used traditionally--is that the only reason, d'ya think?

And no, I never considered outsourcing the pounding to my husband. I like that idea, though if this works, I'm probably going to stick with the lazy way. I also have trouble with time management, it gets to be 10pm and I'm not done.
I think that traditional Korean kimchi is stinky because of the massive amounts of red pepper that is used. The red pepper comes in large bags (quart size or larger) and is very different from the ground red pepper that you can buy in American stores. Mine has always been stinky even without the fish sauce.

I've never pounded kimchi - I always cover it in salt and lay it in a colander to wilt. Then I rinse off most of the salt and put it in a container with spices/onions and brine.
post #234 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellevuemama View Post
I have a Korean cookbook that's like my DH's food bible from home LOL

The daikon is for a daikon kimchi and a sweet pickle daikon, so two different kinds.
Looking forward to hearing how they turn out.

If you ever had time to share either recipe, I'd be interested!
post #235 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by FernG View Post
I think that traditional Korean kimchi is stinky because of the massive amounts of red pepper that is used. The red pepper comes in large bags (quart size or larger) and is very different from the ground red pepper that you can buy in American stores. Mine has always been stinky even without the fish sauce.

I've never pounded kimchi - I always cover it in salt and lay it in a colander to wilt. Then I rinse off most of the salt and put it in a container with spices/onions and brine.
I never would've guessed the difference could be because of the peppers. Huh. Interesting.

How do you know that you've rinsed off the right amount of the salt? I think this method (adding a set amount of salt, and not rinsing, I mean) appeals because I don't feel like I can mess it up as easily, but it sounds un-authentic and it would be neat to try the other way. Have you been making kimchee for a while now? And the brine--is that salty liquid that came off the cabbage, or a separately-made brine?
post #236 of 341
i didnt see anything about fennel anywhere so i just wanted to add... i tried two thinly sliced fennel bulbs with 2 tsp of sea salt and 1 cup water. it is really really yummy i think. im sure you could jazz it up with other ingredients too. it has a nice crunch and anise flavor
post #237 of 341

Kimchi and other painful realities...

Ok so I made the kimchi yesterday. I got MAJOR kudos from DH when he came home from work cause the ENTIRE house smelled like a Korean market. So, apparently that means I did it right.

Here's my question...

When I was mixing the paste, it made these...fumes???....that hit my nose/mouth and I started bawling...think something along the lines of a nuclear onion explosion? So I pasted it blindy onto the leaves and was smearing it around, couldn't see a thing from the tears, so I'm SHOVING it by handfuls into the jars and pounding it in while sobbing uncontrollably :. I stumble to the sink and wash my hands, that helps TREMENDOUSLY, and I look over at the counter and realize I still have over half of it to pack into jars. I've got tears STREAMING down my face, my eyes are red, I mean this is a bit much! 7yo DD comes in to ask what's wrong...I said oh I'm just making kimchi...she says "OH MAMA ARE YOU SAD CAUSE YOU MADE EVERYTHING STINK NOW?"



Anywhoo...has anyone experienced this? We're still dealing with the house smelling kimchi-ish, not a bad thing in itself, and nothing horrible, just a strong smell of it. I can see where ppl say it can stink up the house, if you aren't used to it at least.

So....anyone else think their kimchi was gonna knock 'em dead....literally???

post #238 of 341
Bump...

Oh, and Theoretica? That sounds so authentic! I think I've seen them do that on food travel shows! My method isn't nearly so authentic so I don't have that problem. But very funny (since it wasn't me crying...)
post #239 of 341
Just had my first fermentation failure. I put up a half gallon of cucumber pickles per WF basic recipe, but forgot to put in any grape leaves - it was so gross when I went to check them. They smelled great but were completely mushy. It almost killed my pickle craving, lol. I don't have any fresh grape leaves with the vines being bare right now but I realized, duh, I have a big patch of strawberries and I've used strawberry leaves successfully before so I'll use some of those today when I make up a new batch.

I've found that I like the flavor of the WF pickles better if I double the dill and throw in a nice handful of green peppercorns. I can't wait for fresh green beans this summer so I can try the bean & peppercorn idea I saw earlier in this thread!

I also recently made pineapple vinegar (from NT, to be used making traditional cortido which I have not tried so far) and it smells soooo good! I wonder if there's anything else one can do with fermented pineapple besides cortido. Seems like it would work with the WAP fermented soda recipe, has anybody tried that?
post #240 of 341
velcromom, you can use strawberry leaves? oh you just made my day!: I may just have to go right out tomorrow and find a store that has (naughty, out of season, conventional but probably localish since everything thats long distance in the rest of the country is local right here in cali hothouse. ok, so most of its imported from mexico here too. but more of its local) pickling cucumbers. now, who would have them.....

goodness, sausage tonight, and the prospect of pickles soon. what a happy day. (I don't get sausage often, since the only sausage i know of that doesn't have pork casings is the chicken apple breakfast links made in house at our local whole foods. they have lamb casings. not as good as I remember pork to be, but oh, for the delight of a sausage! I don't know about nitrates or pasturedness or anything else, but on occasion, oh for the delight of sausage. lol)
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