or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Organize & Declutter › infant car seats
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

infant car seats

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I am trying to declutter, dd is no longer in the infant car seat and I don't know what to do with them. She will be my last dc. They are not new, I used them with my other dd, but they are registered and there have been no recalls so I believe they are safe to use. I still have all the directions, etc. My local thrift stores will not take baby items and I don't know anyone that needs them. I hate to put them in landfill. Any ideas?
post #2 of 22
How old are they? If they're older than 5 or 6 they should be destroyed for sure.

-Angela
post #3 of 22
yes, if they're older than 5 years or so, they shouldn't be used. Otherwise, try freecycle.
post #4 of 22
Yup, freecycle is good for this one, unless you've got friends or relatives who need one. A lot of people will appreciate an extra for grandma's or their other car, or wherever, but haven't been able to justify the cost, so it really never hurts to ask.

We just tend to hold on to them until someone pops up who needs them. Have 2 in the shed right now but they're getting older, they'll probably be thrown away just because of their age.
post #5 of 22
Like PP's have said, over 5 years old and they should be destroyed. If they are newer, you could ask around women's shelters, churches etc. to see if anyone needs one.
post #6 of 22
We were moving and didn't have room for it so I tried Freecycle. Someone was going to take it but never showed up so because I had no time left I donated it to pregnancy couseling center.
post #7 of 22
I'm just curious--why is there an age limit on these? I've heard if you are in an accident you should buy a new one but I didn't know general use is bad for them, too. I can't remember what we did with ours -- we used it for both kids and we didn't have room for it anymore...
post #8 of 22
It's because of the plastic used in the seats. Exposure to sunlight in the car all the time causes it to degrade faster then general plastic degradation.
post #9 of 22
Yup, I was going to say Freecycle, Swapace, or donating it to a woman's shelter or church. Or sell it at a garage sale.
post #10 of 22
if you throw them away and you should if they have expired (usually 5 years) please make sure to cut the straps so that they are unusable.
post #11 of 22
If you want to just give it away, try setting it out on the curb with a free sign on it. We usuallty get rid of stuffin under an hour that way .
post #12 of 22
Quote:
If you want to just give it away, try setting it out on the curb with a free sign on it. We usuallty get rid of stuffin under an hour that way
Good idea!!
post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 

thanks!

Great ideas, thank you everyone, looks like one goes away and the other I'll use your ideas.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by magpie mamma
I am trying to declutter, dd is no longer in the infant car seat and I don't know what to do with them. She will be my last dc. They are not new, I used them with my other dd, but they are registered and there have been no recalls so I believe they are safe to use. I still have all the directions, etc. My local thrift stores will not take baby items and I don't know anyone that needs them. I hate to put them in landfill. Any ideas?
Donate them to your local DHR/CPS or a local adoption agency. I have done this with my other baby car seats. This current one I am going to hold on to for awhile though, just in case.

Kim, Cesarean Goddess and Common Sense Mother of Four
You have not converted a man because you have silenced him. – John Morley
post #15 of 22
Do all car seats expire in 5 years??? Even the expensive ones like Britax? How about booster seats? I never knew car seats could expire unless you were in an accident. I know lots of people who have used the seats a lot longer then 5 years. Please tell me more!
post #16 of 22
They all have expiration dates. Plastic degrade over time espcially when it bakes in the sun in a car.

Amy
post #17 of 22
Too bad they don't make non-plastic car seats. You'd think they could do something with metal and just make very, very good covers to protect babies' skin.
post #18 of 22
the straps also dry out and degrade. 9 years is a very old carseat.
post #19 of 22
Why do seats expire:
  • Standards change. For example, seats made before the advent of airbags don't have warnings not to install them in front of an active airbag, and 10 years ago, 20-22 lb was the norm for rear facing weight limits; now, it's 30-35 lb!
  • Parts wear out, break or get lost. Straps fray. Clips break. Moving parts become stiff. Instructions disappear. A broken or misused seat isn't going to provide optimal protection.
  • Technology improves. Almost all new seats are lined with energy absorbing foam to help prevent head injuries in a crash. Side impact protection is the newest trend in CPS technology. While relatively rare, side impacts are the deadliest type of crash for properly restrained children!
  • Recalls occur, and previously used seats usually aren't registered with the manufacturer. If your seat isn't registered, you may not be notified of recalls.

Do you have an older seat? Here's a check list to determine if it's OK to reuse. And remember, seats that have been used in a crash need to be replaced!
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by HelloKitty
It's because of the plastic used in the seats. Exposure to sunlight in the car all the time causes it to degrade faster then general plastic degradation.
And, the foam used inside also degrades. Same holds true for bike helmets.

Here is a quote from carseat.org

Quote:
How old is too old for a safety seat?

There is some controversy about the "expiration" date for safety seats. All experts agree that a seat should be discarded and destroyed if it is more than 10 years old, even if it looks fine. Most manufacturers suggest replacing a seat 5 to 8 years after the date of manufacture, because current safety seats may have better safety features than older seats, such as a tether or air bag warnings. The date of manufacture may be found on a sticker on the seat (unless it has peeled off) and may be stamped into the plastic shell. However, don’t confuse patent dates, which can also be molded into the plastic, with the date the individual safety seat was manufactured. For more information, go to Expiration date
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Organize & Declutter
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Organize & Declutter › infant car seats