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sourdough recipes & wild starters! - Page 6

post #101 of 516
I baked my loaves. They doubled in size; not huge, but THEY DID RISE! I am so proud of myself. I used the no-sponge method, and intended to bake them after I put the kids to bed. Well, that didn't happen, as we lost power in a thunderstorm. My bread ended up sitting overnight, and baking in the morning. So, all told, it rose for about 24 hours.

It has a nice texture, and is sour, but not overwhelmingly so. I'm not sure what it's good for, maybe very small sandwiches or toast or something.

I wonder if my culture (which seems to be nice and bubbly and rises quite nicely in the jar) just needs to mature some, or be used some more. I think I'll keep on trying with it.
post #102 of 516
OM, when you say a lighter flour, do you mean a refined flour rather than a whole grain flour? This time I used a white spelt flour instead of whole grain spelt. I don't have any wheat flour, although I suppose I could purchase some.
post #103 of 516
sourdough failure #1 complete. :

trying to get motivated to try again.

My first attempt yielded bricks with a (too) sour middle, The interior consistency was actually OK, a little heavy, but OK. But way too tangy. And surrounded by a *really* tough crust- I had trouble cutting it. It really didn't rise much at all- even after almost 24 hours.

So, how do I remedy the sourness? Shorter rising time?

And the inedible crust?

TIA for any help or insight.

Kmama, brick maker extraordinaire
post #104 of 516
gardenmommy - yay! By lighter flour I meant a whiter one. Just to see if it helps any.

kmama I'm sure I've posted this before but when I've caught cultures it normally takes a while of baking with it to come right. So it may just be that & not you. The sourness thing is usually from fermenting for a longer time. Or did you use rye flour ? That makes a sourer bread & it doesn't rise much. Your culture can also get contaminated & that can make the flavour a bit dodgy. You can usually tell if that is the problem coz the culture smells yucky. If it's not rising, the things I can think of is it's either too cold where it is, it's not fully active yet or it's not a good culture. You could maybe try once you've done the sponge stage & taken a bit out putting in some honey with the flour. Could counteract the sourness too.

I have a question. I have a friend who went to San Fransisco last year. She said the sanfransisco sourdough was amazing but she reckons most of the flavour from bread is the flour. She says we don't get such good flour over here. My friend the baker is always trying different flours with her breads. What I was wondering was has anyone brought one of these famous cultures & how does the flavour compare commercial vs what you can bake yourself with the culture?
post #105 of 516
So, do you think that I should let it rest for a day or two, and just keep feeding it. Not use it for baking anything? I have a hankerin' to get on with it, to make some more bread.

Oh, and I noticed that it takes about 24 hrs. for my starter to double in size. Is this normal? Is that why my bread takes so long to rise?
post #106 of 516
My culture when I got it rose too quickly. So I am not sure. Maybe split it in two. Feed one bit for a while & bake with it & bake with the other immedietly & compare the results ? Thankfully I have chooks & organic flour costs the same as organic chook food!!
post #107 of 516
OM, that is a good idea. I need to feed my starter tonight, so I will split it into 2 containers. My dh thinks my kitchen looks terribly cluttered, what with all my "experiments" scattered round! I just keep telling him, "hey, it will all turn out for the good!"
post #108 of 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by gardenmommy
OM, that is a good idea. I need to feed my starter tonight, so I will split it into 2 containers. My dh thinks my kitchen looks terribly cluttered, what with all my "experiments" scattered round! I just keep telling him, "hey, it will all turn out for the good!"
DH just asked me what my "concoctions" were. Well, I guess I was a biologist in a former life.
post #109 of 516
All right, round 4. I'm rising it in a different pan. I used kefir for my liquid, added a touch of salt and sugar, and used white spelt flour. Maybe I'll have something more edible this time. My dad told me he didn't like my last bread, my mom thought it was too sour (probably from the long rising time).

It is quite interesting, this sourdough stuff. I think that perhaps at the end of it all, I should have an honorary degree in some science something or other for all of my various experiments!
post #110 of 516
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post #111 of 516
Well, this was my best attempt thus far. I didn't divide the dough, but instead put the whole thing in my big cast iron pan, and left it to rise. After going upstairs, I realized that it was at least 10 (maybe 15) degrees warmer up there than in the kitchen, so I put it up there to rise overnight. This morning, I turned the oven on, put the pan over the vent, and left it for about 3 more hours. When I came back to it, it was nicely doubled in size. I baked it for about 45 min. at 325F, and let it cool for about 30 min. before taking it out of the pan.

I couldn't wait any longer, so I sliced it, toasted it, topped it with raw butter and honey, and well, let's just say it was pretty good. It was quite dense, but very edible. The crust needs some work, but at this point, I'm just really happy to have an edible loaf of bread!
post #112 of 516
I'm glad that you're satisfied with your results, Gardenmommy.

I just caught my starter a bit ago & have fed it about 4 times. I couldn't toss half of the original, so I've got 2 going & have decided to feed one on bread flour & on on whole wheat.

I have made waffles & pancakes. For the pancakes, I used a recipe I found on line & they were ok. I used the recipe from "Full Moon Feast" for waffles rather than for pancakes. They were even better. The difference was a little milk & less salt and soda.
post #113 of 516
I'd like to try making sourdough pancakes but am put off just a bit from a previous experience. I tried making some with half of the first feeding; I liked them, and so did my dds, but my ds and dh thought they were awful. Too sour, I think.

Any thoughts?

I'm going to try making another loaf of bread tomorrow or the next day. Just to see if I can make it any better. Is it possible to get a sourdough bread that isn't very dense? Or is that just part of the sourdough experience?
post #114 of 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by gardenmommy
Is it possible to get a sourdough bread that isn't very dense? Or is that just part of the sourdough experience?
Mine is pretty light and chewy--a very good texture. If you get a good starter going, it shouldn't be too dense, ime.
post #115 of 516
Mine is light & chewy too. ITA about if you get a good culture the texture is not to dense.

I'm in the throes of experimenting with using a ball of dough I saved from the last loaf. I'll know tomorrow how it turned out.
post #116 of 516
Maybe I just need to keep working it at it. I think I'm going to try making some biscuits or pancakes or something with my starter.
post #117 of 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by OceanMomma
I have a question. I have a friend who went to San Fransisco last year. She said the sanfransisco sourdough was amazing but she reckons most of the flavour from bread is the flour. She says we don't get such good flour over here. My friend the baker is always trying different flours with her breads. What I was wondering was has anyone brought one of these famous cultures & how does the flavour compare commercial vs what you can bake yourself with the culture?
I live in the bay area, OceanMomma. Many of the breads here are good. I don't think it's worth it for you to get a culture, though. I've been reading a friends copy of "The Bread Baker's Apprentice" by Peter Reinhart. He says that, eventually, your local flora will take over the culture. You would get SFO sourdough for a while, but then it would revert to a bread more like your local breads.
post #118 of 516
I've just started a starter (go figure, lol) a couple of days ago. I do remember what sourdough smells like...but mine smells like Apple Cider Vinegar. Normal smell?????
post #119 of 516
AuntieM, I ain't got the money to get a SF culture shipped here but I have wondered if cultures change to work with local yeasts. It seems reasonable since you used the same ingredients to catch the culture as you do to make bread. Albeit you leave it for a shorter time. I have wondered how bakeries that make more than one kind of sourdough don't get them mixed up. I've also wondered about wild yeasts already in storage jars. Hence why I always clean mine with boiling water, vinegar & soap to make sure.

One thing about the SF culture I have read is that the wild yeast in it has some kind of symbiotic relationship with another bacteria in it that precludes other organisms growing in it so it keeps its flavour.
http://www.sourdo.com/culture.htm

I have another question. Can you freeze sourdough cultures ? I may just have to try a bit to see what happens.

I also made bread this week with a ball of dough I saved from the last loaf instead of making a sponge with the starter. I made another loaf at the same time by making a sponge. Actually, I made the sponge first. Then when I made the sponge into bread dough, I made the other loaf from the ball of dough & some flour, water & salt. I left them both overnight & then baked them both this morning. The sponge loaf rose a tad more but not much at all & the flavours were identical. Next time I think I will knead the ball of dough loaf more.

babygrant I am not sure as all sourdough cultures I've smelt smell different. My rye one smells of bananas. Thankfully it doesn't taste of them tho'
post #120 of 516
If sourdo.com can keep all their cultures from many different countries true, then you'd assume that it could be kept true in another country?
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