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If you want healthy kids throw out your TV. - Page 3

post #41 of 116
: My dh has almost completed his evil plan to have a TV in every room of the house.
post #42 of 116
This thread reminded me of the most scariest commercial I had the misfortune to see recently. It shows an elderly man getting an old fashion shave at a barber shop. As the barber is shaving the man, three nurses in bleach white uniforms sneak up behind them, one of them holding a pair of large percussion cymbols. The nurse goes to crash the cymbols as the blade is being used on his throat. Then, just before the cymbols crash, they pause the scene and say "We are tired of asking nicely. Give blood." I think they went on to describe the need for donated blood, etc., but I was too shocked for it to register in my brain. The commercial ends with the same nurses proudly walking down the street. Yeah, I sure want to run to the nearest blood bank now....
post #43 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zamber
This thread reminded me of the most scariest commercial I had the misfortune to see recently. It shows an elderly man getting an old fashion shave at a barber shop. As the barber is shaving the man, three nurses in bleach white uniforms sneak up behind them, one of them holding a pair of large percussion cymbols. The nurse goes to crash the cymbols as the blade is being used on his throat. Then, just before the cymbols crash, they pause the scene and say "We are tired of asking nicely. Give blood." I think they went on to describe the need for donated blood, etc., but I was too shocked for it to register in my brain. The commercial ends with the same nurses proudly walking down the street. Yeah, I sure want to run to the nearest blood bank now....
Ugg!! What a horrible commercial. "We are tired of asking nicely?" Last I checked it was not a requirement for people to give blood. It is even against some peoples religion. I don't give blood because I don't like needles but a commercial like that would just make me run the other way!!!
post #44 of 116
That commercial sounds very disturbing. I am very glad I have not seen it.
post #45 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deborah

Just for contrast, try reading a great novel from the past. Dickens or George Eliot or Dostoevsky or Hawthorne. Any brand names? How is character revealed without brand name mentions? I guess that is why they were great novelists...

Deborah
well, in my regencies, they walk on aubusson carpets, go to gunther's for ices, and get their waistcoats made by weston, but that's not quite what you meant, was it?
post #46 of 116
i'm usually sort of afraid to post in this forum because i'm still doing muy vaccine research but since tv is something i've had a bit of scholling on...and i have strong opinions about it...

i've seen lots of good points brought out.

Quote:
Well, not watching advertising is a good beginning, but don't forget the product placements. Movies are full of them. Have fun watching for the brand name shots. They are all paid for.

As a librarian, I've been freaked out by the growing brand name presence in novels, particularly the light-weight silly novels. People don't eat "donuts" they eat a particular brand of donut, they don't wear perfume, they wear a particular brand of perfume, the brand of car is always mentioned.

Nowadays we are what we buy.

I don't think the novelists are being paid (yet) for the placements, but it is an indication of a society that is totally suckered by consumerism.
originally posted by deborah

i did my senior seminor research project on product place ment so i'm constanttly interuppting our viewing to announce "Product Placement!"

i know what you mean about the literary tjing too. I've got a book by miriam keyes and its actually set in the world of book publishing and there a snippet in there about paying authors to place products... (and a few products weree placed in this particular book, a toyota mr2 is one i specifically remember)

Quote:
Since my children were little we have discussed commercials, what they are for, how they make the products look better then they are, why people fall for it, and so on.
originally posted by kewb

every ad you see with your kids is an opportubity to talk about marketing and consumerism. even with very young children you can point out that what they just saw was a paid commercial designed to make them beleive thus and such about a product or brand. you can talk about celebrity (cartoon or character ) endorsements.

i like the idea of researching the "i want thats"!

Quote:
Plus all the commercials talking about how "amazing" the latest prescription drug is...I hate those. Most of the time the side-effects are worse then the condition they're supposed to treat.
oroginally posted by pariah

those are my dd's favorite commercials and always have been. first it was "the purple pill-nexium", then she was into "gotta go gotta go gotta go right now-detrol la" and now she likes lunesta and their butterfly.

anyone evr read Four Arguments For The Elimination of Television?

i've got a few others on my bookshelf but i can't remember the titles.
post #47 of 116
nak

interesting topic

I just had an interesting discussion about this with a neighbour of mine who's a child pscyhologist involved with this group.Looks like interesting stuff they're doing.
post #48 of 116
I think this started in the vaccine forum so certain people wouldn't see it Really, I'm glad it's where it belongs.

I can't think of the last time my daughter saw something on TV and expressed an interest in buying it - and she watches, on average, at least a couple of hours of TV a day... and has for at least 12 years now. She's the least consumerist kid I've met, doesn't follow the current styles or brand trends, doesn't trust the mainstream news or mainstream advertising, and has at least 12 hours of awake time a day to fill with all of her other interests (if she's not doing them simultaneously with tv watching). She's very healthy and always has been, and she's always had free access to TV.

When she was little, she sometimes wanted things she saw on TV, but we talked about advertsing and advertising techniques and had some experiences with buying things that weren't as cool as they'd seemed on tv... and that experience has helped her beome a teenager who doesn't do or buy things just because someone says they're "hip", and doesn't follow the crowd but instead makes her own decisions. Her exposure to the media enabled her to develop resistence to these things.

I don't think the issue is TV at all, but parenting. TV is a great tool, but a lousy parent, and parking your alone kid in front of the tube isn't doing your job as a parent.

There are also so many things my daughter has gained from TV. She's watching SNL right now - marvelous satire - and the same is true of South Park and The Simpsons. The clever society commentary and cultural references in the shows have shaped the way she thinks, and helped give complexity to her thoughts and humor. At other times in her life, other shows have exposed her to other things, more than I could ever give her live in a lifetime.

For more, read Everything Bad is Good for You...

dar
post #49 of 116
We stopped watching TV 2 weeks ago and it has been the best thing for my dd! She has been so imaginative and creative! But we still have the tv. But if you are thinking of going tv less it is not as hard as it may seem.
post #50 of 116
I let comercials run the worst thing I did was to FF through them. We don't watch must TV here we rent two films from the liabary ussually scolastic books on film sometimes a disney and that lasts us two weeks. DD likes Dora and Diego but we pretty much only watch it is its a new epsoide, DH ans I hav one or two shws we like but I think we all average maybe an hour a week for DD and 2-3 for DH and I. But I noticed that even in the limited amount if I FF through comercials DD got impatient and hyper. We actually found it was better for US to 1) limit exposure 2) make her wait for specific dates and times DVR was horrible here for here but nice for DH and I and eliminate TV watching for sake of watching.
Honestly yes TV is fluff but fine there are just fluffy things we do, I don't applogize for using TV for occasional entertainment value we do lots of other things. We once went 6 months with no TV when we first moved here we learned lots of alternitve things that was cool we also learned we want the TV cabin fever set in enough that I will proudly say yes we own a TV what of it.

Deanna
post #51 of 116
We try to limit TV, but even with the little that does get watched there are still waaaay too many commercials :

When I started noticing that DD was being influenced by them ("Mommy, I want THAAAT!"), we had a little chat about commercials just being things to make people buy their stuff and give them their money.
So now, whenever commercials come on she'll get really annoyed and tell the TV "We don't need your stuff! Mommy, tell them we don't want that!!"

Ideally though, I'd LOVE to get rid of the darn thing...DH is a techie though, so I can't get away with it (his idea of a nice home is totally different than mine--TVs in every room, etc ).
post #52 of 116
No thanks. My family really enjoys watching TV. We even like some commercials. Sometimes we like what they have to offer us and we are interested, and sometimed (more often than not) we think the commercials or the product is stupid. We do enjoy laughing at the lame acting in many of them. I don't feel that we've been brainwashed at all by television.
post #53 of 116
Unfortunately it gets so hot in the desert in the summers that we depend a lot on TV to get us through. During the morning I can turn on the water outside and they have fun but by 9AM it's too hot. Even their wading pool is like 115! We get really tired in the afternoons and I have been in the habit the last couple of years to use that as siesta time. Turn on a movie and we lie around and relax. It's just too darned hot to venture out because you still have to get back into a really, really, really hot car. It's like an oven. Literally.

But during the spring/fall I agree, it's great to turn off the TV and let the kids play and have fun! We homeschool year round. Dd is allowed to watch one show on PBS before "school" and one show afterwards, for a total of 1 hour of TV a day. Sometimes we do movies in the late afternoon while I cook dinner.

My dd has learned a lot by PBS/Discovery shows. We don't watch too much of the junk. Well, I do sometimes but that's when they are napping. Dd does like to watch supernanny with me because she likes to see the kids acting up. lol!
post #54 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dar
I think this started in the vaccine forum so certain people wouldn't see it Really, I'm glad it's where it belongs.

I can't think of the last time my daughter saw something on TV and expressed an interest in buying it - and she watches, on average, at least a couple of hours of TV a day... and has for at least 12 years now. She's the least consumerist kid I've met, doesn't follow the current styles or brand trends, doesn't trust the mainstream news or mainstream advertising, and has at least 12 hours of awake time a day to fill with all of her other interests (if she's not doing them simultaneously with tv watching). She's very healthy and always has been, and she's always had free access to TV.

When she was little, she sometimes wanted things she saw on TV, but we talked about advertsing and advertising techniques and had some experiences with buying things that weren't as cool as they'd seemed on tv... and that experience has helped her beome a teenager who doesn't do or buy things just because someone says they're "hip", and doesn't follow the crowd but instead makes her own decisions. Her exposure to the media enabled her to develop resistence to these things.

I don't think the issue is TV at all, but parenting. TV is a great tool, but a lousy parent, and parking your alone kid in front of the tube isn't doing your job as a parent.

There are also so many things my daughter has gained from TV. She's watching SNL right now - marvelous satire - and the same is true of South Park and The Simpsons. The clever society commentary and cultural references in the shows have shaped the way she thinks, and helped give complexity to her thoughts and humor. At other times in her life, other shows have exposed her to other things, more than I could ever give her live in a lifetime.

For more, read Everything Bad is Good for You...

dar

Another amazingly sensible post by Dar! With whom I have almost nothing in common as I am a non-radical public schooling rule based (though GD) mama.

But my three dd's who only have "natural limits" (they are busy with school, friends, dance classes) on TV watching, have no "consumer-itis". Like Dar, I can't even remember the last time they asked for anything that was on TV...

Last night we sat and watched the news stories about the upcoming immigration day and talked about the issue at length. And then they watched "Deal or no Deal" which is kind of innane, and which I can't even watch, but when I came into the room they and my DH were involved with a complicated discussion of statisical probabitity, complete with equations scrawled on the back of an American Girl magazine, all brought on by the premise of this show!
post #55 of 116
I agree with those who have said that the problem is not TV or commercials, but lack of parental guidance. My kids (ages 6 and 3) don't have any rules about TV (or much of anything else), either in terms of amount or content. They do not spend all day in front of the TV and they do not whine for things from commercials. I do try to redirect them from the worst commercialism, but not to the point of forbidding them from watching it. Now I might reconsider if there were some problem, or if they were watching a lot of stuff contrary to our values, but it has never been a problem, so I don't "address" it.

We do talk about commercials and consumerism and how companies want us to buy their products so they can get our money, and we talk about how commercials don't always tell the whole truth about a product. I also explain about how some of the products are made in other places by people who are very sad that they have to work in factories all day instead of being with their families.

It is true that we are affected by commercials--the advertising industry is very good at making ads that stick in our minds--but we are only influenced as much as we choose to allow ourselves to be influenced.

I think a lot of it has to do with modeling--dh and I have never watched much TV, so it's never been a "normal" thing for them. I think the best thing we've done for them in terms of protecting them from consumerism has been keeping them out of school.

Then again, I am the crazy radical mama who lets her kids eat whatever they want whenever they want and sleep whenever they want and who doesn't make them go to school or do chores, so take that as you will.



Quote:
Originally Posted by the_dalai_mama
Well, yes.
I teach in a public school part time and I swear the kids brains have been permanently altered by tv, vaxes, and processed foods.
Our school has us sign a "media agreement" that kids will not watch tv, have computer time, or play video games on school days.
Now, dh and I just need to sign that agreement wrt computer time ourselves
Do you mean that you as teachers are not allowed to use TV, computers, or video games in the classroom, or that you actually ask parents to restrict these things at home? Because I would be seriously irritated if a school, especially a public school, tried to tell me what I could allow for my own children in my own home.
post #56 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brigianna
Because I would be seriously irritated if a school, especially a public school, tried to tell me what I could allow for my own children in my own home.
: No freaking way would that happen.
post #57 of 116
Quote:
Unfortunately it gets so hot in the desert in the summers that we depend a lot on TV to get us through. During the morning I can turn on the water outside and they have fun but by 9AM it's too hot. Even their wading pool is like 115!
Yup thats us add to that appartment living and thus no yard ect to play in and sorry their are just times when were are VERY thankfull for the TV even if its just a 15-30 mintue break.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brigianna
Because I would be seriously irritated if a school, especially a public school, tried to tell me what I could allow for my own children in my own home.
Ditto and I find the no computer time strange when it seems so many assignments kids are getting around here dirrectly involve the use of a computer.

Deanna
post #58 of 116
I don't think TV is super evil or super great. Sometimes it can be useful and entertaining and sometimes not. It depends on how it is used.
I've noticed that my dd has been paying a bit more attention to TV commercials lately. She doesn't say she wants stuff but she'll ask me questions about what she sees.
post #59 of 116
I find nothing wrong with the tv if its limited. We only have educational commericals here (we live on a military base overseas) but not the point. DD watches what ive approved on dvd and sometimes our best times are when we are lounging on the sofa she is so cuddly when we are watching rachel ray lol
post #60 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dar
I don't think the issue is TV at all, but parenting. TV is a great tool, but a lousy parent, and parking your alone kid in front of the tube isn't doing your job as a parent.

There are also so many things my daughter has gained from TV. She's watching SNL right now - marvelous satire - and the same is true of South Park and The Simpsons. The clever society commentary and cultural references in the shows have shaped the way she thinks, and helped give complexity to her thoughts and humor. At other times in her life, other shows have exposed her to other things, more than I could ever give her live in a lifetime.

For more, read Everything Bad is Good for You...

dar
I agree. My dd is watching That's Entertainment now. We don't watch a lot of commercial TV, but we do watch American Idol and we've watched the Olympics. When a commercial comes on we play a game - what are they trying to make you buy? How does the commercial do that? I talk to her about marketing and consumerism (which is prevalent everywhere, even in the diaper forums and in Mothering magazine).

Cheers
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