or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › What sewing machine do you have?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What sewing machine do you have? - Page 2

post #21 of 95
Good for you, sabrinat!! I have never learned how to set the timing. How were you able to learn to do that?
post #22 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by E.V. Lowi
Good for you, sabrinat!! I have never learned how to set the timing. How were you able to learn to do that?
I joined a bunch of machine related yahoo groups. There are tons of people who love vintage machine and just want to share their knowledge. Most of them have retired mechanics and dealership owners and they are a fountain of info. I learned a little known secret though, according to some of the gurus on the lists most machines do not go out of timing...that's like when you go to the doctor w/some kind of vague symptoms and upper resp. thing they always say it's a virus. It's something that satisfies most folk and validates that there's a problem, kwim. They said usually it's something simple almost 95% related to user error. I was skeptical, but I have found that the majority of the time when I thought something was wrong with the timing or tension it really had to do with my thread, my needle, my bobbin or how I threaded the machine. Not the machine. But, back to your original question...If you have an older mechinical machine and you get a service manual for it or sometimes the owners manual will tell you how to adjust everything. Amazingly the owners manual for my singer 503 tells you everything, they wanted you to take it apart yourself, it told you every place to oil and lube the machine and how to adjust the tension on the bobbin. It was like they wanted you to be able to really take care of your own machine.
I did have one machine that I owned...a plastic wonder that was a piece of junk...the tension was never right no matter what it was set on...sometime you do get what you pay for.
post #23 of 95
I have a brother from walmart, the most basic model, that will be a great learning machine for my daughter , but it has major tension issues. I have an old new home machine that I just got and also an old Necchi...that old Necchi is such a wonderful machine. I also have a brand spankin' new Janome 634D serger that I really like, it was a slight upgrade from my Kenmore...that Kenmore was a good machine too...
post #24 of 95
Thread Starter 
Nita,
congrats on baby magdalena
I love my Necchi too. It's a workhorse in the true since of the word. Which one do you have? I have a bu nova.
post #25 of 95
neat, sewing machine lovers after my own heart.

I own a Janome Harmony 8080, a janome made Kenmore serger (with the lay in thread tension disks) and a Janome Coverpro 1000cp. If I were to have no limit on the budget I'd get one of the viking designers. I have to say that I really do enjoy my machines though.
post #26 of 95
I have 2 older metal Kenmores. I love them, except the bobbin winders slip on both of them. Oh well, I hated winding bobbins anyway.
post #27 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by boingo82
I have 2 older metal Kenmores. I love them, except the bobbin winders slip on both of them. Oh well, I hated winding bobbins anyway.
Those were some really well made machines. They should last your practically forever with a little tlc. Enjoy!
post #28 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by sabrinat
Nita,
congrats on baby magdalena
I love my Necchi too. It's a workhorse in the true since of the word. Which one do you have? I have a bu nova.
Thank you!

I can't really find a ton of info on mine but I do know it was made in Taiwan, so it's not considered one of the "classics" like you have! It's a 523? ( http://pages.sewing-machine-manuals....temNo=smm1807a this one) It is a verynice machine though, almost flawless!

My New Home is a 552. It is an "advanced" machine, very many stitches, I can't wait to use it! DH bought both machines for me right before
Magdalena came so I haven't had a ton of time to research them. I did get lucky and find a manual for the New Home, and even luckier that the Necchi came with its manual.
post #29 of 95
I have a babylock serger, a 1960's singer, a 1980's singer and a brother, I use the brother the most, but I can't wait to up grade and get some fancy stitches.
The antique singer has soo many stiches etc but I'm scared to really push it
post #30 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajira
I have a babylock serger, a 1960's singer, a 1980's singer and a brother, I use the brother the most, but I can't wait to up grade and get some fancy stitches.
The antique singer has soo many stiches etc but I'm scared to really push it
Which singer are you calling antique, the one from the 60's or the 80's When I read that I had to laugh since I was born in the 60's and hadn't yet begun to think of myself as antique . I prefer to think of it as vintage since antique usually refers to something over 100 years.
If you have a 1960's era singer depending on which model it is, it's virtually indestructiable, I'd push it to max! Sew and enjoy!
post #31 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by sabrinat
Which singer are you calling antique, the one from the 60's or the 80's When I read that I had to laugh since I was born in the 60's and hadn't yet begun to think of myself as antique . I prefer to think of it as vintage since antique usually refers to something over 100 years.
If you have a 1960's era singer depending on which model it is, it's virtually indestructiable, I'd push it to max! Sew and enjoy!
I meant the 60's one If my mom heard me say that she's more than likely pop me she was born in the 50's

The thing is it has sooo many add ons, it can do like 3 different colours of trim with one attachment, and altho I know from using my mom's which I learnt using the orginal foot thingie without her I'm LOST, I just grab the easy for me brother because I know if it breaks I can afford a new one, or get it fixed without having to hunt down someone.
But I'll make an effort to try some of the stiches on my dipes they should look really cool
post #32 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajira
The thing is it has sooo many add ons, it can do like 3 different colours of trim with one attachment. But I'll make an effort to try some of the stiches on my dipes they should look really cool
Do you mean it has cams. I love cams! They are the precursor to the computer processor for making multiple stitches. I have a ruffler, monogramer and buttonholer and other feet for my singer. They were such well thought out precise little buggers, I have a bunch of machines and none are easier to use and care for than the singer, that's why there were so many in so many homes. Girl if you ain't going to use that thing, pass it over here It will plow through diaper making stuff like going through butter! You don't know how lucky you are that you're mom let you have it. An all metal machine of that quality today is nonexistent (since most are largely plastic), cherish it and don't try to sell it off at some garage sale for $20, or some machine enthusiast will snatch it up and be sprinting to their car faster than you can blink
post #33 of 95
It was a gift from my aunt she had 2, and selling it is out of the question, my mom and my aunt would gang up on me and kill me
I guess it's a cam, I know I have a ruffler and buttonholer, but I've never seen some of these pieces before and they are about 8-10 of them, you make me want to learn
post #34 of 95
Both of my Kenmores have cams, and they both can use each other's cams. They're pretty fun.
post #35 of 95
I really would love a vintage singer!!

I have a simplicity I bought from amazon, it wasn't that expensive and it has a lot of various stitches and came with a few different feet so at the time it was nice for the budget. It's fine for what I do, nothing fancy. I'm pattern impaired and can't sew straight. It's like this mental block . So I mostly make blankets for the kids and do basic mending. I love to sew and wish I could really master it so I could do more.
post #36 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pilesoflaundry
I really would love a vintage singer!!
Keep your eyes open. I see them all the time. At goodwill, flea markets, garage sales, craigslist. I got one off freecycle. They are super easy to care for and you can't break em. Good luck on the quest. I have several vintage machines. I love singer, but there are some other great vintage machines out there too. I wouldn't pass up an older kenmore or necchi.

Quote:
I'm pattern impaired and can't sew straight. It's like this mental block . So I mostly make blankets for the kids and do basic mending. I love to sew and wish I could really master it so I could do more.
Sewing is alot of practice...you do get better. If you're having trouble understanding a pattern, you might need to get yourself a good basic sewing manual, it'll explain what the words on the pattern mean AND how to do the techniques. I have the simply the best sewing guide and Sewing Made Easy. I use them alot and I can say that I have gotten better over time although I'm just an advanced beginner at best, but I love it too. As far as the straight lines go, put a piece of masking tape at the 5/8th mark all the way down so that you have a long guide to follow and that should make it a bit easier to follow.
post #37 of 95
Sabrina, thanks. I think it's my brain though, I can't read maps and I have trouble with math and driving too. : I can read the pattern but when it comes to sewing or cutting and right side together/flip etc. I do things on the wrong side. Someone linked the discalucula site in tao a week or so ago and I realized that sounds a lot like me.

I will check out those books .
post #38 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pilesoflaundry
Sabrina, thanks. I think it's my brain though, I can't read maps and I have trouble with math and driving too. : I can read the pattern but when it comes to sewing or cutting and right side together/flip etc. I do things on the wrong side. Someone linked the discalucula site in tao a week or so ago and I realized that sounds a lot like me.

I will check out those books .
Oh that's a pretty common thing...I think wood workers always say measure twice, cut once. I have cut out too many of something, too few of something. Cut going the wrong directions...you name it, it has happened. I study pattern sometimes and lay it all out. Does it look like the pix, is stuff going the same way? I swear...practice, practice...and when you think you got it, practice some more.
post #39 of 95
I have a babylock evolve, a bernina 1630, and an old metal kenmore. It works, my 3 yo dd runs it without a needle, but I haven't taken the time yet to figure out how to thread it!

I would love a top of the line bernina or babylock, but it's hard to justify that much money. However, I know I would get my money's worth because I make nearly all of mine and my dd's clothes.

Stacy
post #40 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kylee'smom
I have a babylock evolve, a bernina 1630, and an old metal kenmore. It works, my 3 yo dd runs it without a needle, but I haven't taken the time yet to figure out how to thread it!

I would love a top of the line bernina or babylock, but it's hard to justify that much money. However, I know I would get my money's worth because I make nearly all of mine and my dd's clothes.

Stacy
I'm curious as I was just having this very conversation yesterday. Why do you make your own clothes? Do you find that it's more economic or do you just like to sew garments?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Arts & Crafts
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › What sewing machine do you have?