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NTers.....Anybody MAke Butter?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I got some raw cream and I want to make some butter instead of paying $15.00 a pound
post #2 of 12
the foxfire cookbook http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/cus..._encoding=UTF8 has some great recipes in it for making butter....i found a copy of this book at my library...so perhaps, if you don't feel like purchasing the book, you can borrow it from your local library
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks I can get it at my library, of course someone else has it check out.
post #4 of 12
I just put it in my mixer and whip it until it becomes butter. I sample it at the whipped cream stage of course. At the end you will have butter and buttermilk. Drink or cook with the butter milk. It's good. Your butter will store longer if you rinse the butter with water after pouring off the buttermilk. I don't usually bother. It doesn't last that long around here.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
To GaleForce....

Quote:
Your butter will store longer if you rinse the butter with water after pouring off the buttermilk. I don't usually bother.
How long does the butter last if you rinse with water or not?

And at speed do you use for the blender?
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholas_mom
To GaleForce....



How long does the butter last if you rinse with water or not?

And at speed do you use for the blender?
I've had raw butter that I didn't rinse for about 3 weeks and toward the end it just started tasting fermented. I just rinsed the last batch but I doubt it would last the 3 weeks to test the difference.

I blend it at a high speed mainly so that it won't take all day.

It's hard to mess up butter.
post #7 of 12
I read a recipe in Violet magazine (the issue with Patricia Arquette on the cover) and am STILL kicking myself for pitching it. Anyone have that recipe?

OP: The woman who wrote the article and who gives the recipe talks about how she used to make it with her Grandma when she was young. Basically, if I recall correctly, you put a few ingredients into a chilled, covered jar and shake till you can't shake no mo. I'm dying to try it.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by teacup
I read a recipe in Violet magazine (the issue with Patricia Arquette on the cover) and am STILL kicking myself for pitching it. Anyone have that recipe?

OP: The woman who wrote the article and who gives the recipe talks about how she used to make it with her Grandma when she was young. Basically, if I recall correctly, you put a few ingredients into a chilled, covered jar and shake till you can't shake no mo. I'm dying to try it.
That is how I make it. I place raw cream in mason jars (never more than half full because it expands while you shake). I let it sit at room temperature with the lids on for about 4-6 hours until it is room temperature. If you don't let it warm up you will be shaking the jar until your arm falls off. Just shake once it warms. You will notice the cream start to thicken until it is very hard to shake and it sticks to the sides of the jar. At this point you are almost there. You will soon notice the separation of white thin looking buttermilk and deep yellow butter (in the spring and fall). Don't shake for more than 20 or 30 seconds past the separation or it can form together again and you won't have true butter. Place the mason jar in the fridge for a couple hours before separating butter and buttermilk. This allows for the butter to harden again which will make rinsing much easier. After a couple hours drain the buttermilk off and pour in enough spring or well water (nothing with chlorine as this will kill the good bacteria) to cover the butter and give it a good shaking/sloshing. Drain and repeat two more times. Let all the water drip off and enjoy!
post #9 of 12
Yeah, I make my butter the shake it till you can't shake no mo way. The kids have a blast helping with that part.

Put your cream in a wide-mouth quart jar. Shake until you think your arm will fall off. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl. The liquid in the bowl is buttermilk, the clumps in the sieve are butter. Return to the jar and add a ton of ice. Shake some more.

Repeat the straining bit after the ice melts. Repeat the ice and straining technique a few more times.

Place butter in a cheesecloth. Roll and squeeze until you can't remove any more liquid. Voila! Butter.
post #10 of 12
I second the shaking method in mason jars. We used to make butter like that at summer camp. It's a great activity for kids too!
post #11 of 12
I do mine in the kitchenaid mixer. I've also made it with the food processor, and the little hand mixer. I suggest that if you do it with a mixer, keep your eye on it, because when it separates, it happens quickly, and I've ended up sloshing buttermilk all over my counter more than a few times.

I always rinse it in cold water, then knead in some salt. I prefer my butter salted.
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the advice.

If I want to make sweet cream, do I let the cream warm up to room temp before mixing??
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