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Enki, Christopherus, and non-Christian families - Page 2

post #21 of 34
Thanks, KimberMama. I think I'm actually leaning toward Enki now, not even necessarily for the kids but because *I* need to get some structure in my life. I'm going to try the "daily rythm" out for a while and see how it goes . . . I love the idea of starting the day off with a walk!
So, in the preschool stuff, would it be useful with a 2yo do you think? I mean, if I were to modify things enough to her level? I'm the type who kind of likes to rush into things and feel an urge to buy the curriculum right now
post #22 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by HerthElde
Thanks, KimberMama. I think I'm actually leaning toward Enki now, not even necessarily for the kids but because *I* need to get some structure in my life. I'm going to try the "daily rythm" out for a while and see how it goes . . . I love the idea of starting the day off with a walk!
So, in the preschool stuff, would it be useful with a 2yo do you think? I mean, if I were to modify things enough to her level? I'm the type who kind of likes to rush into things and feel an urge to buy the curriculum right now
While having a strong daily rhythm is good for any aged child (or adult), I do think it might be rushing it a bit to buy Enki for your daughter, at least the kindy package. What she needs right now is for you to live your life and include her in it. Let her help wash dishes, stir the bowl of batter, sweep, dust, garden, etc. Even Donna Simmon's doesn't address her kindy book to children younger than 3YO. Also, with a 2YO you really can't be sure of what you are going to want to do, so investing a lot in a curriculum might be a bad idea.

Have you spent an extensive amount of time reading the Enki website and letting that glimpse of the philosophy sink in? If you have, and it resonates with you, perhaps you could just buy the guides and start working with those. It is definitely too soon to be thinking about story curricula and the like, but you could be doing simple sensory integration work with your daughter, and very simple arts and crafts (but real art and real crafts - not packaged foam projects and coloring books).

Do remember though, that the guides are an investment - you can't just sell in good conscience them if you don't like them (this is also true of Live Ed, and Donna of Christopherus has considered requiring the same with her materials).
post #23 of 34
kimbermama, thanks for the link to your blog; really helpful to read your daily "schedule". Inspiring.

I'm wondering how to incorporate social situations into my time with my 4.5 yr old; I'd love to find/create an enki group. Are there are any tips for that kin of thing in the guides?

r.e. witches; that brought to mind something I'm uncomfortable with in waldorf which is the emphasis on "good" versus "bad". As a buddhist those concepts do not really fit with my philosophy and I'm assuming enki does not make things so black and white?

yes, wisdomkeeper, we do need our own subforum under homeschooling.
post #24 of 34
Thread Starter 
Good question Muse. I feel the same way. Hopefully you are correct in assuming that Enki doesn't portray things as so "black and white."
post #25 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by muse
kimbermama, thanks for the link to your blog; really helpful to read your daily "schedule". Inspiring.

I'm wondering how to incorporate social situations into my time with my 4.5 yr old; I'd love to find/create an enki group. Are there are any tips for that kin of thing in the guides?
Thanks for your feedback on my blog. Of course, my time is limited, if I spend a lot of time here or at Amity's I have less time to write. I should take an idea from my friend and copy some of my posts onto my blog.

There is definitely information on starting and holding an Enki co-operative. The tough thing, IMO, can be finding other Enki families in your area to form a group. I've thought about it, and even a group restricted to those using some form of Waldorf isn't going to have the same flavor. It's really helpful if everyone is on the same page and is using Enki at home.

There is a holistic education sub-forum on Amity's, and it is barely trafficked.
post #26 of 34
Thread Starter 
KimberMama, I've been going through my books, preparing for the switch to Enki and wondering what I should keep and what I should give away. Did you find a lot of repetition between the Christopherus stuff and the Enki stuff? In particular, I'm looking at the Curriculum Overview and the Nature Book and the lists of resources they contain and wondering if they would be useful to keep or if the Enki stuff would make them unnecessary. Did you keep any of your Christopherus stuff? (I have just about everything except for the first grade syllabus).
post #27 of 34
Thread Starter 
I posted this on the Enki Homeschooling thread, but realized that those following this thread might also be interested:

Here is a cost comparison between Christopherus and necessary resources and Enki, for anyone interested, here is what I spent on K level stuff before deciding to switch to Enki:
Christopherus K guide, $27.50
Christopherus Science guide, $38
Christopherus Joyful Movement, $22
Christopherus Drawing w/ 4-11, $22
Christopherus Curriculum Overview, $50
You are Your Child's First Teacher, $10 (used)
Folk and Fairy Tale books, $15 (used)
Fingerplay books, $5 (used)
Seasonal and craft books, $30
Storytelling book, $8 (used)
Golden beetle books K stories, homeschool guide, movement guide (for more stories and to gain a richer understanding of Waldorf concepts and curriculum), $84

Total: $311.50 plus all the numerous shipping charges because all of this was obtained from many different sources. Also, I still don't feel like I have everything I need. If not switching to enki, I would probably need to buy some more songbooks and/or CDs and some more books on pedagogy and such.

The Enki K package is $450, plus about $20 for shipping. It contains complete information on Enki philosophy and pedagogy, fairy and folk tales, nature stories and science, crafts, movement, songs, fingerplays, music CDs, DVD demonstrations, etc.

So while I can't say it definitively, because I don't own enki yet, but it seems to me like it is fairly priced and worth the money. Also it took me a long time to put together all the resources that I did after reading the Christopherus guides, plus time hunting for books at the library. So it appears that enki would save time as well, because everything is right there.

That said, I do appreciate my Christopherus stuff, and will likely hang on to it for future reference (and am even considering attending one of Donna's conferences just because there is one in August that isn't too far from home), but knowing what I know now, I wish I had just started with Enki. It would have saved me time, I think, and cost about the same.

And of course there is also the fact that I'm just drawn to enki. It speaks very deeply to me and feels like a good match for my family.

Okay, well just wanted to share my current thoughts on all this.

Hope everyone had a lovely Memorial Weekend.
post #28 of 34
wow, thanks for breaking that down, wisdomkeeper.

oh boy, $470? i only came up with $200, I thought it was just teacher guide and K curriculum but obviously I'm mising something

You also get a free consultation when you buy the teacher guide, right?
I can imagine also wanting to budget for a few consultations through the year.


ah, what a dilemma.

I have one more preschool to check out before totally throwing that idea out, and then we will take the enki plunge, i think...
post #29 of 34
Thread Starter 
Hi Muse. Yes, that is right, you do get a consultation when you buy the K package.

The K package includes:
-The Enki Homeschool Teaching Guides: Foundation Guides and the Early Childhood Guide (3 books total)
-Kindergarten Folk and Fairy Tales book
-Kindergarten Nature Stories book(which includes science info for the "teacher")
-Kindergarten Crafts book
-Learning Through Movement, Seasons, and Skills, Grade K (which includes book, CDs, and demonstration DVDs)
-Community Festivals and Songs K-5 (which includes book and CDs)

The package is $450 plus shipping which is around $20 (this is a lot of heavy stuff!)

I should also point out, that my total of $311 with Christopherus and other resources would have been much higher had many of my purchases not been used (I found several used books through Amazon.com). Also the shipping I paid for all my varied purchases was probably close to $50.

I think it is helpful for those trying to decide between Christopherus and Enki, that although there appears to be a great price difference (I originally thought this as well) that when all is said and done, there really isn't much of a difference. Knowing this makes it so much easier to choose the one that resonates with you and your family, without worrying about the difference in price.
post #30 of 34
Please note that the Foundation guides (two of those three books listed above) are a one time purchase. They are, well the foundation for Enki. They are incredible and have really changed my outlook on what is possible for my family and myself. You wont need those in coming years, so that is why when you look at the site the price is different for returning families. Also worth noting is that currently, and I dont know for how long, but there is a monthly conference call (with a group of Enki using families and Beth) This is a great support and a wonderful way to really hash out thoughts and ideas on topics relating to both enki homeschooling and just the different phases of childhood.
post #31 of 34
Thread Starter 
Good point Blissful Bee. The foundation guides do cover so much more beyond Kindergarten, don't they? Also the community songs are used all the way through like 5th grade, right? I've also heard that many of the other books, like the crafts and nature stories are still useful for first grade and beyond.

I just placed my order for the complete K package tonight. I can't wait to get it!
I'll post my initial thoughts on it, once it arrives.
post #32 of 34
Jumping back in on this one...I'm hardly ever here at Mothering.

I can guarantee that I spent more than the Enki kindy package price for Waldorf and kindy resources. Some I've kept, some I've let go, and soon I think more will leave us. Finally buying Enki has brought a sigh of relief - I may need lots more supplies (always true of an arts-centered program), but I don't need more books until grade 2.

The phone consultation is great! Beth really helped me figure out where my boys should be and she offered a lot of insight and reassurance as to teaching them together. I also participated in my first conference call and found that inspiring as well.

I'll link my blog again...just in case someone missed it. I too am blogging about using Enki and making it a part of our lives.

I'm so please to see that several people have ordered Enki!

Peace,

Kimberly
post #33 of 34
Yay, I did it! Ordered the full K package. After much debating and stress here, I feel relief and excitement at last.
post #34 of 34
subbing....extremely interested in Enki!
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