or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at Home and Beyond › How is it different?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How is it different?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hi

I know there are many ways to homeschool and this has got me thinking.

I am the kind of homeschooler whose kids learn at home, covering a variety of topics most of which the kids choose, but still covering the fundamentals in creative ways as well. Once in a while we join the HS groups for outings, and have play dates. And the girls are in the beginning level of girl guides. I am with a program that requires me to note my time and write a page per week on what we did. Thankfully we always have lots to share.

I have some friends whose kids are in a different program which offers free classes that require hours of travel each day to get to. These classes are in extra things like horseback riding, drama, rock climbing, art, music, etc. They are only comprised of HS kids. Now if this id the ONLY stuff the kids have time for - is it enough? is it homeschooling if the kids are never home? (I mean I know the teachers there teach a little differently, and the kids are socialized a little differently, but isn't it still a class?

are they considered unschoolers while at home or in the car, but something else while at class? Does the variety of classes and getting to choose whether or not to take them mean they are better than if the kids were in a different program?

What makes these types of programs different from PS classes? or even from other types of lessons with kids from PS as well?

Are my kids missing out because they are not taking lessons from others?

All these nagging questions....

anyone have any opinions or answers?
post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by m&m
What makes these types of programs different from PS classes? or even from other types of lessons with kids from PS as well?
I have kids who do a number of such activities (art classes, violin & piano lessons, group violin classes, community orchestra, sports practices). The main difference to me is that the children are deciding that these things are important to them and that they want the input and inspiration and experience that they are getting from the class scenarios.

Miranda
post #3 of 7
Yup. Unschooling doesn't mean that your kids can't choose to take classes. It's not about *limiting* their options, but *expanding* them.

My latest blog entry details all of the classes my daughter has planned for this summer... and she's since added guitar.

dar
post #4 of 7
Quote:
What makes these types of programs different from PS classes
Just from what you wrote, their education and daily life seems dramatically different from a typical PS.
post #5 of 7
I think its different because:

1) The children are choosing their lessons and how they want to spend their time.

2) Private lessons are usually taught be experts that have a passion for the subject matter that they are teaching. Children absorb the passion of their teachers vs the less positive vibes that they might encounter from someone teaching in a less favorable environment.
post #6 of 7
When a child is seeking more knowledge or expertise (beyond what a parent can offer) he is following his passions and interests by taking a class or getting instruction. This would definately be unschooling.
post #7 of 7
The quality of the class should be far better than a public school class. I remember in high school, my history teacher taught Spanish for a year. She didn't know Spanish; how could she teach it? Anyone who questioned it was told it was because she was "a teacher." Fast forward to this spring. Ds1 took a two month Spanish class at our local community college. It was great. The lady was a native speaker and engaged the kids in learning.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Learning at Home and Beyond
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at Home and Beyond › How is it different?