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Can Stirrups Ever Be A Good Thing? - Page 3

post #41 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan
I read somewhere, have no idea about the validity of the source, that the lithotomy position was first used for childbirth when one of the French kings wanted to get off on watching his mistresses give birth.
More than that, he wanted to watch them give birth in the most painful position he could think of and that was it. Since most women at that time gave birth upright (usually on a stool), laying down seemed very unnatural to him and appealed to his sadistic tendencies. It was one of the Louises, by the way, Louis VI perhaps? Anyway, by laying the women down, their labors were slowed and the maximum discomfort was afforded. He got off on it and voila, the rest is history. In latter years, doctors discovered this afforded them better access to the birth itself, mother's comfort and/or usefullness aside. Lithomy position also became incredibly "helpful" with the advent of epidurals.

Namaste, Tara
post #42 of 62
as a side note ~ it really makes me angry that so many years after a sadistic bastardo started a whack trend that women are still being subjected to this. :
post #43 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan
I read somewhere, have no idea about the validity of the source, that the lithotomy position was first used for childbirth when one of the French kings wanted to get off on watching his mistresses give birth.
Louis the XIV. This is well documented in history of childbirth books. You might have read it in Lying In or perhaps The American Way of Birth. There are others as well.
post #44 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamsInDigital
Laboring, especially pushing, while lying down is excrutiating. You would be better off on your hands and knees or squatting instead of stirrups.
I'm pretty sure I'm going UC next time. Threads like these are driving me crazy.
:
post #45 of 62
I gave birth both times in the "semi-reclined" position. The first time, the nurse/doctor put me into that position. But the second time, I promised myself I'd pick whatever position I wanted. And that one was just fine. I didn't have to push; she pushed her own self out. It does happen to be the position my midwife usually has moms get into, but in my case (and this was before attending any births with her) she gave no input.

I asked her months later about the movement of the sacrum and the pelvis being confined in that position. Her answer was that although most believe that semi-reclined is a "crappy" position (as someone on this thread categorized it) she finds that it works well for most women. Most of her moms push for far less than 30 minutes, and many push for less than 10. She compared it to the fact that according to most of the literature, women very rarely have orgasms or enjoy sex in the missionary position. But in her experience (and mine for that matter) the missionary position is just great, and semi-reclining works well for birth.

Furthermore, a Bradley instructor/chiropractor once told me that semi-reclining was a fine position for birth.

So I guess my input to this discussion is simply, do what works for you and your body. Try not to let a doctor or midwife tell you how to birth, and do what your body tells you to do. Whether that includes "stirrups" or whatever. As long as you are unencumbered by drugs, I think your animal self is the best indication of the position you should take.
post #46 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by momileigh
So I guess my input to this discussion is simply, do what works for you and your body. Try not to let a doctor or midwife tell you how to birth, and do what your body tells you to do. Whether that includes "stirrups" or whatever. As long as you are unencumbered by drugs, I think your animal self is the best indication of the position you should take.
Funny you sould mention that. My L&D nurse wanted me to try squatting, but I just did not feel comfortable that way! Though I did use stirrups (And now that everyone is saying it, I realize I was semi-reclined) I did also spend a good amount of time on all fours. Back labor was the pits!
post #47 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by momileigh
She compared it to the fact that according to most of the literature, women very rarely have orgasms or enjoy sex in the missionary position. But in her experience (and mine for that matter) the missionary position is just great, and semi-reclining works well for birth.
Just to clarify, you aren't saying that the missionary position is semi-reclined, right? Just using it as an analogy?
post #48 of 62
What is important is not what position you labor in, it's being able to change positions and labor how you want to not how anyone else thinks you should?
post #49 of 62
Talked to an ob recently who explained that stirrups make it easier for him to see. So I guess that's a good thing for him. Personally I don't think anyone should be looking there - water birth for me!
post #50 of 62
SC: Yes, of course, it was an analogy. Most literature states that the missionary position (woman lying flat on her back, man on top) is not enjoyable for the woman, and women cannot usually have an orgasm in that position. In my experience, and my midwife's experience, this is simply untrue, despite all the "reasons" that it should be true. Similarly, most natural birth literature comes out against any position that puts pressure on the sacrum, including semi-reclining; but again, the real-life experience of my births and my midwife's many years of experience comes out that it can be a fine position.

None of this is to say that the missionary position is semi-reclining. :-) (Did I have you wondering if you were doing it wrong? )
post #51 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by momileigh
SC: Yes, of course, it was an analogy.
None of this is to say that the missionary position is semi-reclining. :-) (Did I have you wondering if you were doing it wrong? )
Sorry, I was just feeling really slow when I was reading your earlier post and wanted to make sure I was understanding the analogy.
post #52 of 62
(i hate the missionary position. ... )
post #53 of 62
Also, just because a birth attendant becomes comfortable with a certain position doesn't make it ideal for giving birth. Most women can push a baby out in the semi-reclined position, but that still doesn't make it an ideal position to use. I've found in my own practice that the less directive I am, the less I see that semi-reclined position. In particular, since I stopped checking to see if someone is completely dilated and therefore it is okay to push, I see many more women pushing in more natural positions. If I put someone on their back to do a cervical check, they more often than not end up staying there to push - while if they just start pushing when the urge strikes them, then they are often in an alternative position that they have gotten into spontaneously.
I also will not do an instrumented delivery for "maternal exhaustion" or "failure to descend" unless the mom has a try at pushing in a full squat or on her knees. Since I've started that, I've done very, very few vacuum assists. Just Sat morning, I had a mama (with an epidural actually, by her choice) push for quite a while in that semi-reclined position without moving the baby much. We helped support her into a hands and knees position, and baby was crowning within 20 minutes.
When women are uncoached as to how they should be in labor, I think you'd rarely see the semi-reclined position.
post #54 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by klothos
(i hate the missionary position. ... )
my stbx was incredibly unimaginative...the only two positions he would do most of the time was me on top or him on top. of the two missionary was best for me but i still had trouble giving birth on my back!
post #55 of 62
The other thing I'm wondering is whether everyone's semi-reclined is the same. Because, with the missionary position, there are variations of positioning that can take it from basically bleh for both me and dh to what I want everytime. So I'm wondering if there are variations of the semi-reclined position that help straighten out the birth canal. Or ways the mothers moved during pushing to accomodate things.
post #56 of 62
My last birth was a hospital birth with midwives. What I really liked about it was the bed had a squat bar that attached to it. I was able to get up and squat when I needed to, but I actually birthed her with my legs up on the bar, pushing down on it in an almost upright position. I was kind of perched up on the bar. I pushed her out in under 30 minutes and had no tears.

Second birth was also a hospital birth supposed to be attended by a midwife but she didn't make it. I pushed a semi-reclining position, baby was out in under 5 minutes and no tearing then either.

First birth was the standard intervention filled birth, so I pushed with stirrups for 1.5 hours and had a 2nd degree episiotomy.

So, I guess I'm trying to say, that stirrups probably do more harm then good.
post #57 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by rozzie'sma
I stood up in the stirrups. They had handles and I pulled myself up off the table completely so I was kind of teetering in the things. Really made the OB nervous. And he tried to push my chest down but I almost fell off the table when he did that so he gave up
gosh, I saw someone do that once. Was it you? It scared the CRAP out of me. This very tall woman standing on the foot of her bad...it was like whoa...how could I help her when she is way up there!
post #58 of 62

Stirrups are good for riding horses

Also good for GYN surgery. I am not sure what else they do better than a supportive partner.
post #59 of 62
Yes, of course some of us hate the missionary position! Some of us love it. And some of us, because of the way we are put together and maybe other factors such as baby size, presentation, position, etc, should or should not birth in a semi-reclined position. There is someone out there who I'm sure will say she loves her stirrups when she's giving birth. (Personally, I think stirrups, for me, are degrading and terrifying... just seeing them raises my blood pressure... and I never used them in birth... I'm just not going to project those feelings on every woman out there.) So, are stirrups ever a good thing is the op here. I'm saying, if it works for you, and its what your body wants, do it. Use whatever is at your disposal for your birth. Try it if you think you'll like it.
post #60 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan
Actually, a sitting position is even just as bad as laying flat on your back because of how it pushes on your pelvis.
I read that semi-sitting was the worst position because it curls your tailbone up, lay flat is preferable because your tailbone is out of the way.

the only good use for stirups I can think of is for gripping to balance while you squat
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