or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

NT June Thread - Page 2

post #21 of 545
subbing
post #22 of 545
NAK

subbing
post #23 of 545
I made the ginger carrots. Thanks to advice here I made with less than 1/2 teasp. of salt but I forgot that I wasn't suppose to put whey in it. I put about 2 tablspn of whey instead of 4 tablsp. I hope the carrots are not too mushy.

We will try them tonight for dinner.

QUESTION: So, I notice in the cookbook that Sally cooks the meat for many hours. Why is that? I cook my chicken breast for 20 mins at 450 and they are done.
post #24 of 545
Here's a good article on the benefits of sea salt. The author is Rebecca Wood and she seems to take a very NT approach.

-----------

The Sweetness of Salt

Good sea salt helps make foods taste delicious. Regrettably, there are
many brands masquerading as natural so here are the secrets for
selecting the best. We’ll also examine why unrefined salt is critical
to your health.

Have you ever tasted a few grains of table salt? They taste sharp,
salty and acrid and their lingering flavor is harsh, metallic and
unpleasantly bitter. Not pleasurable. That’s because table salt is
refined, at 1200 degrees F. into a pure chemical (99.9% sodium
chloride) and mixed with other chemical additives. Extreme heat
molecularly alters any food—salt included—making it hard to assimilate.

Not to worry about a pinch of poor salt here and there. But, if shoddy
salt is your norm, then those denatured grains and additives add up, on
corn chip after corn chip and year after year, to form a substantive
physiological insult.

Unrefined sea salt, on the other hand, tastes both salty and sweet with
a round, smooth, utterly pleasant after taste and a satisfying
sea-spray flavor. A quality sea salt is 94% sodium chloride with 6%
trace minerals and zero additives.

Please, do a taste test and compare table salt with quality salt.
You’ll be astounded by your taste buds acuity!

Like a miniature sea, your healthy blood, lymph, and extra-cellular
fluids are similar to ocean water in their mineral content. How
convenient that unrefined sea salt contains all the sodium and trace
elements—including iodine—balanced in the same ratio as sea water.
Quality salt helps keep your inner oceans healthy and balanced.

(Iodine, a mineral needed for proper thyroid function, is less stable
than other minerals and it dissipates from mined, refined, washed, or
kiln-dried salt. Moreover, when table salt is enriched with iodine,
even more chemicals must be added to stabilize the iodine and to
prevent it from turning purple.)

Daily you lose sodium and trace minerals through normal body processes.
They must be replaced. Using unrefined sea salt is one easy way to do
so. Furthermore, the minerals from natural sea salt are more easily
assimilated than are mineral additives or supplements.

Yet, another reason that salt is important is that sodium is one of the
three vital electrolyte minerals. It helps convey energy and the spark
of life itself. It is this electrical charge that enables nerve
impulses and muscle contraction. With good reason, salt is the primary
flavor additive throughout the world.

Selecting Quality Salt

To determine quality salt, first consider its source. As all salt is
ocean derived and comes either from a living or dead sea. When mined
from the salt beds of an extinct ocean (like the Dead Sea or the Great
Salt Lake) then eons of rain fall have percolated through the salt
deposits leaching out iodine and most of the trace minerals; and,
therefore, much of the flavor. I do not recommend mined salt.

Thus, evaporated ocean water is a superior choice. Your guidelines for
selecting an evaporated salt include: location, processing and taste.
This doesn’t bode well for Morton and Leslie Salt, for example, who
evaporate their salt from San Francisco bay water, kiln dry it and use
additives.

There are several high-priced boutique salts costing as much as $30 a
pound that, in my opinion, are scams. In some culinary circles, it’s
fashionable to use kosher salt and that’s a misinformed trend. Kosher
salt is highly refined, contains additives and tastes nasty.

I favor the brand that identifies its source and manufacturing
techniques. My favorite salt is Celtic sea salt. Traditionally
processed with wooden rakes in Brittany along the coast of Northern
France, it is available under several different brand names and in
several grades. Unfortunately, some brands of Celtic sea salt are
processed and contain additives. Carefully read labels.

My favorite brand is the stone ground Eden Foods salt, available at
area natural food stores and on line. Prepared without chemical
processing aids, it costs more than table salt, about $4 per pound, but
it’s worth it and a pound lasts a long time.

May you be well nourished,

Rebecca Wood
post #25 of 545


I fermented my raw macadamias. Forgot about them and soaked for almost 24 hrs. Pee-uuuuuuu! They stink.

I'm roasting them now in a hotter oven. You think I destroyed them? Two tubs of them too. :
post #26 of 545
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamaMamamama
Please recommend a kids friendly high vitamin CLO (trying to slow down tooth decay with dd#2). We've been using NN but found out on the board that she needs high vitamin. I came across blue ice and the other one on radient living? Just wanted to make sure its tasty enough that she'll take it. She loves NN's peach flavor btw.
Blue Ice is a good quality high-vitamin oil.The one by Radiant Life is also a high vitamin oil but they use vitamin E in their preparation which is soy-derived. The E doesn't contain any isoflavones or goitrogens so is essentially inert tho its antioxidant properties remain. If soy is not an issue for you then either one of these oils is a good choice.
post #27 of 545
:
post #28 of 545
I got the Blue Ice cinnamon flavor. It's my favorite so far. Definately a higher quality, and I like the cinnamon tingle.
post #29 of 545
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinky Tuscadero
OK, I had a big NT day. I started some apple chutney. I made a cheesecake out of my yogurt cheese. Went to the farm and got more pastured eggs. Soaking some flour to make pumpkin muffins in the morning that I will eat with my (accidental) homemade butter!

Suzy
That feels good! I always feel so satisfied at the end of a day like this. I need to get on the stick again. Today, I tended the kefir, started soaking almonds for crispy nuts, soaked grains for waffles tomorrow, and made a super smoothies for breakfast today.

On a sweet note, I made ice cream (raw cream, maple syrup, and small amt. of organic sugar) today. And yesterday, I made really yummy, but not at all NT chocolate chip cookies. I justified it by saying they were for my Dd's ballet recital. yep, that's what they were for...
post #30 of 545
subbing so I dont get lost
post #31 of 545
Quote:
Originally Posted by gardenmommy
On a sweet note, I made ice cream (raw cream, maple syrup, and small amt. of organic sugar) today.
Gardenmommy, I remember you posting about ice cream before, asking about the frequency of eating it. What about adding a couple of pastured raw egg yolks to it before freezing? That would take it to another level nutritionally. What kind of ice cream maker do you use?
post #32 of 545
I tried making kefir with raw goat milk and a packet of kefir powder I bought at the health food store.

I did not like it at all. : How do you guys eat/drink this stuff? I tried just drinking a few sips of it, and I also tried soaking some oatmeal in it, and I darn near spit the stuff out.

I have been very bad with my NT-ness lately. My sister visited us for over a week and we ate out almost every day, and I'm out of town all next week because I'm getting married back on the east coast.
post #33 of 545
I was reading in NT that garbanzos should have the skins picked off??? Does anyone do this or do you just not eat them? Dd & I love garbanzo beans and I usually just soak them, but now I just realize that it says the skins should be picked off too.
post #34 of 545
Okay one more quick question. Do any of you take the Butter Oil from greenpastures.com? I was looking at the BlueIce CLO on their site and it said you should take the 2 together, but the price is *really* high.
post #35 of 545
I've never noticed that about the garbanzos. There's so much in that book! I soak and cook mine and I know a lot of the skins come off , but I never actually peel them off.

It's always recommended to take butter oil to get the most benefits from your CLO. Price found the best results when the two were combined. Many people do not, though, as it is pricey. But my chapter leader was just at their facility last weekend for the raw milk conference and saw all that goes into making a bottle of that stuff. It is material and labor intensive to make.
post #36 of 545
Quote:
Originally Posted by celestialdrmrmama
I was reading in NT that garbanzos should have the skins picked off??? Does anyone do this or do you just not eat them? Dd & I love garbanzo beans and I usually just soak them, but now I just realize that it says the skins should be picked off too.
Usually when I soak and sprout, then cook, the skins fall off in the water. That may be because I overcook all of my beans though :
post #37 of 545
Quote:
Originally Posted by kallyn
I tried making kefir with raw goat milk and a packet of kefir powder I bought at the health food store.

I did not like it at all. : How do you guys eat/drink this stuff? I tried just drinking a few sips of it, and I also tried soaking some oatmeal in it, and I darn near spit the stuff out.

I have been very bad with my NT-ness lately. My sister visited us for over a week and we ate out almost every day, and I'm out of town all next week because I'm getting married back on the east coast.
Congrats!
So, do you think it's the goat milk you didn't like, or the kefir? I've only had kefir from the real grains, so I don't know how it compares with powder. But we like it here! We just have fun with it and make sour lemon faces drinking it. Otherwise, people usually make smoothies with it.
post #38 of 545
Quote:
Originally Posted by carnelian
Blue Ice is a good quality high-vitamin oil.The one by Radiant Life is also a high vitamin oil but they use vitamin E in their preparation which is soy-derived. The E doesn't contain any isoflavones or goitrogens so is essentially inert tho its antioxidant properties remain. If soy is not an issue for you then either one of these oils is a good choice.
Oh, no, and I just bought several bottles of RAdiant Life...isn't soy an issue for everyone?

Ann
post #39 of 545
There are some folks who are allergic to it. So for some it's more of an issue than others. RLC assured me that none of the isoflavones or goitrogens remain in the E thus rendering it inert aside from its antioxidant properties. I would think you'd be fine to take it. Pretty much all vitamin E on the market today is soy-derived unless it specifies otherwise.
post #40 of 545
Carnelian, I hadn't thought of adding egg to it. I wonder how that would affect the texture/consistency/flavor. If it was significantly different, I'm not sure my family would accept it. However, if I remember correctly, didn't old-fashioned ice cream recipes call for raw eggs? Until it was deemed unsafe and all that?

On drinking kefir: I must confess, I cannot stomach it unless it is in a smoothie. Then I can drink cups of it! I also use it for soaking grains, baking, etc. Gives stuff a nice tang.

IRT garbanzos: when I've soaked and cooked them, the skins usually sort of peel off on their own. I always rinse them pretty well before making hummus, and the force of the water takes off most of the skins. I didn't know I was supposed to remove the skins. I just did because it makes the texture of my hummus nicer.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Traditional Foods